Breast Cancer

Lasers Med Sci. 2016 Dec;31(9):1775-1782. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

The effects of low-level laser irradiation on breast tumor in mice and the expression of Let-7a, miR-155, miR-21, miR125, and miR376b.

Khori V1, Alizadeh AM2, Gheisary Z3, Farsinejad S3, Najafi F4, Khalighfard S3, Ghafari F3, Hadji M3, Khodayari H3.

Author information

  • 1Ischemic Disorders Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran.
  • 2Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Zip Code: 1419733141. aalizadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.
  • 3Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Zip Code: 1419733141.
  • 4Medical Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amir Kabir University, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a form of photon therapy which can be a non-invasive therapeutic procedure in cancer therapy using low-intensity light in the range of 450-800 nm. One of the main functional features of laser therapy is the photobiostimulation effects of low-level lasers on various biological systems including altering DNA synthesis and modifying gene expression, and stopping cellular proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLT on mice mammary tumor and the expression of Let-7a, miR155, miR21, miR125, and miR376b in the plasma and tumor samples. Sixteen mice were equally divided into four groups including control, and blue, green, and red lasers at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 632 nm, respectively. Weber Medical Applied Laser irradiation was carried out with a low power of 1-3 mW and a series of 10 treatments at three times a week after tumor establishment. Tumor volume was weekly measured by a digital vernier caliper, and qRT-PCR assays were performed to accomplish the study. Depending on the number of groups and the p value of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of normality, a t test, a one-way ANOVA, or a non-parametric test was used for data analyses, and p?<?0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The average tumor volume was significantly less in the treated blue group than the control group on at days 21, 28, and 35 after cancerous cell injection. Our data also showed an increase of Let-7a and miR125a expression and a decrease of miR155, miR21, and miR376b expression after LLLT with the blue laser both the plasma and tumor samples compared to other groups. It seems that the non-invasive nature of laser bio-stimulation can make LLLT an attractive alternative therapeutic tool.

Lasers Med Sci. 2016 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]

The use of low-level light therapy in supportive care for patients with breast cancer: review of the literature.

Robijns J1,2, Censabella S3, Bulens P4,3, Maes A4,3, Mebis J5,4,3.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Medicine & Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Martelarenlaan 42, 3500, Hasselt, Belgium. jolien.robijns@uhasselt.be.
  • 2Limburg Oncology Center, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium. jolien.robijns@uhasselt.be.
  • 3Division of Medical Oncology, Jessa Hospital, Campus Virga Jesse, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium.
  • 4Limburg Oncology Center, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium.
  • 5Faculty of Medicine & Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Martelarenlaan 42, 3500, Hasselt, Belgium.

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, with an incidence of 1.7 million in 2012. Breast cancer and its treatments can bring along serious side effects such as fatigue, skin toxicity, lymphedema, pain, nausea, etc. These can substantially affect the patients’ quality of life. Therefore, supportive care for breast cancer patients is an essential mainstay in the treatment. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) also named photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has proven its efficiency in general medicine for already more than 40 years. It is a noninvasive treatment option used to stimulate wound healing and reduce inflammation, edema, and pain. LLLT is used in different medical settings ranging from dermatology, physiotherapy, and neurology to dentistry. Since the last twenty years, LLLT is becoming a new treatment modality in supportive care for breast cancer. For this review, all existing literature concerning the use of LLLT for breast cancer was used to provide evidence in the following domains: oral mucositis (OM), radiodermatitis (RD), lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The findings of this review suggest that LLLT is a promising option for the management of breast cancer treatment-related side effects. However, it still remains important to define appropriate treatment and irradiation parameters for each condition in order to ensure the effectiveness of LLLT.

Antioxid Redox Signal. 2015 Sep 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Phototherapy-induced antitumor immunity: long-term tumor supression effects via photoinactivation of respiratory chain oxidase-triggered superoxide anion burst.

Lu C1,2, Zhou F3, Wu S4,5,6, Liu L7, Xing D8.
Author information
1Guangzhou, China.
2MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; lucx@scnu.edu.cn.
3MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; zhouff@scnu.edu.cn.
4South China Normal UniversityGuang Zhou, China , 510631.
5China.
6MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; wushn@scnu.edu.cn.
7MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; liulei@scnu.edu.cn.
8South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan west road, Tianhe district , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; xingda@scnu.edu.cn.

Abstract
AIMS:
Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) results in oxidative damage that induces tumor cell apoptosis. In this study, we focused on the immunological effects of HF-LPLI phototherapy and explored its antitumor immune regulatory mechanism.
RESULTS:
We found not only that HF-LPLI treatment induced tumor cell apoptosis but also that HF-LPLI-treated apoptotic tumor cells activated macrophages. Due to mitochondrial superoxide anion burst after HF-LPLI treatment, tumor cells displayed a high level of phosphatidylserine oxidation, which mediated the recognition and uptake by macrophages with the subsequent secretion of cytokines and generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In addition, in vivo results showed that HF-LPLI treatment caused leukocyte infiltration into the tumor and efficaciously inhibited tumor growth in an EMT6 tumor model. These phenomena were absent in the respiration-deficient EMT6 tumor model, implying that the HF-LPLI-elicited immunological effects were dependent on the mitochondrial superoxide anion burst.
INNOVATION:
Here, for the first time, we show that HF-LPLI mediates tumor-killing effects via targeting photoinactivation respiratory chain oxidase to trigger a superoxide anion burst, leading to a high level of oxidatively modified moieties, which contributes to the phenotypic changes in macrophages and mediates the antitumor immune response.
CONCLUSION:
Our results suggest that HF-LPLI may be an effective cancer treatment modality that both eradicates the treated primary tumors and induces an antitumor immune response via photoinactivation of respiratory chain oxidase to trigger superoxide anion burst.
Discov Med. 2015 Apr;19(105):293-301.

Advances in strategies and methodologies in cancer immunotherapy.

Lam SS1, Zhou F2, Hode T1, Nordquist RE1, Alleruzzo L1, Raker J1, Chen WR3.

Author information

  • 1Immunophotonics Inc., 4320 Forest Park Ave. #303, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
  • 2Biophotonics Research Laboratory, Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034, USA.
  • 3Biophotonics Research Laboratory, Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034, USA and Immunophotonics Inc., 4320 Forest Park Ave. #303, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.

Abstract

Since the invention of Coley’s toxin by William Coley in early 1900s, the path for cancer immunotherapy has been a convoluted one. Although still not considered standard of care, with the FDA approval of trastuzumab, Provenge and ipilimumab, the medical and scientific community has started to embrace the possibility that immunotherapy could be a new hope for cancer patients with otherwise untreatable metastatic diseases. This review aims to summarize the development of some major strategies in cancer immunotherapy, from the earliest peptide vaccine and transfer of tumor specific antibodies/T cells to the more recent dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, whole cell tumor vaccines, and checkpoint blockade therapy. Discussion of some major milestones and obstacles in the shaping of the field and the future perspectives is included. Photoimmunotherapy is also reviewed as an example of emerging new therapies combining phototherapy and immunotherapy.

 J Biomed Opt.  2012 Oct;17(10):101516. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.10.101516.

Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

Magrini TD, dos Santos NV, Milazzotto MP, Cerchiaro G, da Silva Martinho H.

Source

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia 166, Bangu, Santo André, SP 09210-170, Brazil.

Abstract

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000 mJ/cm². The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5 mJ/cm², MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1 J/cm² laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8 mJ/cm², the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

Photomed Laser Surg.  2012 Sep;30(9):551-8. doi: 10.1089/pho.2011.3186. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

A preliminary study of the safety of red light phototherapy of tissues harboring cancer.

Myakishev-Rempel M, Stadler I, Brondon P, Axe DR, Friedman M, Nardia FB, Lanzafame R.

Source

Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA. max.rempel@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present.

BACKGROUND DATA:

LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation or promotion of metastatic lesions or new primary tumors. There has been little scientific study of oncologic outcomes after use of LLLT in cancer patients.

METHODS:

A standard SKH mouse nonmelanoma UV-induced skin cancer model was used after visible squamous cell carcinomas were present, to study the effects of LLLT on tumor growth. The red light group (n=8) received automated full body 670 nm LLLT delivered twice a day at 5 J/cm(2) using an LED source. The control group (n=8) was handled similarly, but did not receive LLLT. Measurements on 330 tumors were conducted for 37 consecutive days, while the animals received daily LLLT.

RESULTS:

Daily tumor measurements demonstrated no measurable effect of LLLT on tumor growth.

CONCLUSIONS:

This experiment suggests that LLLT at these parameters may be safe even when malignant lesions are present. Further studies on the effects of photoirradiation on neoplasms are warranted.

J Biomed Opt. 2012 Oct 25;17(10):101516-1. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.10.101516.

Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

Magrini TD, Dos Santos NV, Milazzotto MP, Cerchiaro G, da Silva Martinho H.

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000 mJ/cm2. The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5 mJ/cm2, MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1 J/cm2 laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8 mJ/cm2, the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

Photomed Laser Surg.  2012 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print]

A Preliminary Study of the Safety of Red Light Phototherapy of Tissues Harboring Cancer.

Myakishev-Rempel M, Stadler I, Brondon P, Axe DR, Friedman M, Nardia FB, Lanzafame R.

Source

1 Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester , Rochester, New York.

Abstract

Abstract Objective: Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present.

Background data: LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation or promotion of metastatic lesions or new primary tumors. There has been little scientific study of oncologic outcomes after use of LLLT in cancer patients.

Methods: A standard SKH mouse nonmelanoma UV-induced skin cancer model was used after visible squamous cell carcinomas were present, to study the effects of LLLT on tumor growth. The red light group (n=8) received automated full body 670 nm LLLT delivered twice a day at 5 J/cm(2) using an LED source. The control group (n=8) was handled similarly, but did not receive LLLT.

Measurements on 330 tumors were conducted for 37 consecutive days, while the animals received daily LLLT. Results: Daily tumor measurements demonstrated no measurable effect of LLLT on tumor growth.

Conclusions: This experiment suggests that LLLT at these parameters may be safe even when malignant lesions are present. Further studies on the effects of photoirradiation on neoplasms are warranted.

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult.  2012 Jul-Aug;(4):23-32.

The efficacy of polychromatic visible and infrared radiation used for the postoperative immunological rehabilitation of patients with breast cancer.

[Article in Russian]
[No authors listed]

Abstract

The immunological rehabilitation of the patients with oncological problems after the completion of standard anti-tumour therapy remains a topical problem in modern medicine. The up-to-date phototherapeutic methods find the increasingly wider application for the treatment of such patients including the use of monochromatic visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers and photodiodes. The objective of the present study was to substantiate the expediency of postoperative immune rehabilitation of the patients with breast cancer (BC) by means of irradiation of the body surface with polychromatic visible (pVIS) in combination with polychromatic infrared (pIR) light similar to the natural solar radiation without its minor UV component. The study included 19 patients with stage I–II BC at the mean age of 54.0 +/- 4.28 years having the infiltrative-ductal form of the tumour who had undergone mastectomy. These patients were randomly allocated to two groups, one given the standard course of postoperative rehabilitation (control), the other (study group) additionally treated with pVIS + pIR radiation applied to the lumbar-sacral region from days 1 to 7 after surgery. A Bioptron-2 phototherapeutic device, Switzerland, was used for the purpose (480-3400 nm, 40 mW/cm2, 12 J/cm2, with the light spot diameter of 15 cm). The modern standard immunological methods were employed. It was found that mastectomy induced changes of many characteristics of cellular and humoral immunity; many of them in different patients were oppositely directed. These changes were apparent within the first 7 days postoperatively. The course of phototherapy (PT) was shown to prevent the postoperative decrease in the counts of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, the total amount of CD3+ -T-lymphocytes (LPC), CD4+ -T-helpers, activated T-lymphocytes (CD3+ HLA-DR+ cells) and IgA levels as well as intracellular digestion rate of neutrophil-phagocyted bacteria. Moreover PT promoted faster normalization of postoperative leukocytosis and activation of cytotoxic CD8+ -T-LPC, reduced the elevated concentration of immune complexes in blood. Among the six tested cytokines, viz. IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-alpha, and IFN-gamma, only the latter two underwent significant elevation of their blood concentrations (IL-6 within 1 day) and IFN-gamma (within 7 days after mastectomy). The course of PT resulted in the decrease of their levels to the initial values. The follow-up of the treated patients during 4 years revealed neither recurrence of the disease nor the appearance of metastases.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2010 Feb;28(1):115-23.

The effect of laser irradiation on proliferation of human breast carcinoma, melanoma, and immortalized mammary epithelial cells.

Powell K, Low P, McDonnell PA, Laakso EL, Ralph SJ.

School of Medical Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study compared the effects of different doses (J/cm(2)) of laser phototherapy at wavelengths of either 780, 830, or 904 nm on human breast carcinoma, melanoma, and immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines in vitro. In addition, we examined whether laser irradiation would malignantly transform the murine fibroblast NIH3T3 cell line.

BACKGROUND: Laser phototherapy is used in the clinical treatment of breast cancer-related lymphoedema, despite limited safety information. This study contributes to systematically developing guidelines for the safe use of laser in breast cancer-related lymphoedema. METHODS: Human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), human breast ductal carcinoma with melanomic genotypic traits (MDA-MB-435S), and immortalized human mammary epithelial (SVCT and Bre80hTERT) cell lines were irradiated with a single exposure of laser. MCF-7 cells were further irradiated with two and three exposures of each laser wavelength. Cell proliferation was assessed 24 h after irradiation.

RESULTS: Although certain doses of laser increased MCF-7 cell proliferation, multiple exposures had either no effect or showed negative dose response relationships. No sign of malignant transformation of cells by laser phototherapy was detected under the conditions applied here.

CONCLUSION: Before a definitive conclusion can be made regarding the safety of laser for breast cancer-related lymphoedema, further in vivo research is required.

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):49-52.

Application of low-power visible and near infrared radiation in clinical oncology.

[Article in Russian]

Zimin AA, Zhevago NA, Buniakova AI, Samoilova KA.

Although low-power visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers, photodiodes, and other sources does not cause neoplastic transformation of the tissue, these phototherapeutic techniques are looked at with a great deal of caution for fear of their stimulatory effect on tumour growth. This apprehension arises in the first place from the reports on the possibility that the proliferative activity of tumour cells may increase after their in vitro exposure to light. Much less is known that these phototherapeutic modalities have been successfully used for the prevention and management of complications developing after surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy. The objective of the present review is to summarize the results of applications of low-power visible and near infrared radiation for the treatment of patients with oncological diseases during the last 20-25 years. It should be emphasized that 2-4 year-long follow-up observations have not revealed any increase in the frequency of tumour recurrence and metastasis.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2009 Oct;27(5):763-9.

Managing postmastectomy lymphedema with low-level laser therapy.

Lau RW, Cheing GL.

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in managing postmastectomy lymphedema. BACKGROUND DATA: Postmastectomy lymphedema (PML) is a common complication of breast cancer treatment that causes various symptoms, functional impairment, or even psychosocial morbidity. A prospective, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effectiveness of LLLT on managing PML.

METHODS: Twenty-one women suffering from unilateral PML were randomly allocated to receive either 12 sessions of LLLT in 4 wk (the laser group) or no laser irradiation (the control group). Volumetry and tonometry were used to monitor arm volume and tissue resistance; the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was used for measuring subjective symptoms. Outcome measures were assessed before and after the treatment period and at the 4 wk follow-up.

RESULTS: Reduction in arm volume and increase in tissue softening was found in the laser group only. At the follow-up session, significant between-group differences (all p < 0.05) were found in arm volume and tissue resistance at the anterior torso and forearm region. The laser group had a 16% reduction in the arm volume at the end of the treatment period, that dropped to 28% in the follow-up. Moreover, the laser group demonstrated a cumulative increase from 15% to 33% in the tonometry readings over the forearm and anterior torso. The DASH score of the laser group showed progressive improvement over time.

CONCLUSION: LLLT was effective in the management of PML, and the effects were maintained to the 4 wk follow-up.

Clin Rehabil. 2009 Feb;23(2):117-24

Efficacy of pneumatic compression and low-level laser therapy in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphoedema: a randomized controlled trial.

Kozanoglu E, Basaran S, Paydas S, Sarpel T.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey.

Objective: To compare the long-term efficacy of pneumatic compression and low-level laser therapies in the management of postmastectomy lymphoedema.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.Setting: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of Cukurova University, Turkey.

Subjects: Forty-seven patients with postmastectomy lymphoedema were enrolled in the study.Interventions: Patients were randomly allocated to pneumatic compression (group I, n=24) and low-level laser (group II, n=23) groups. Group I received 2 hours of compression therapy and group II received 20 minutes of laser therapy for four weeks. All patients were advised to perform daily limb exercises.Main measures: Demographic features, difference between sum of the circumferences of affected and unaffected limbs (triangle upC), pain with visual analogue scale and grip strength were recorded.

Results: Mean age of the patients was 48.3 (10.4) years. triangle upC decreased significantly at one, three and six months within both groups, and the decrease was still significant at month 12 only in group II (P = 0.004). Improvement of group II was greater than that of group I post treatment (P = 0.04) and at month 12 after 12 months (P = 0.02). Pain was significantly reduced in group I only at posttreatment evaluation, whereas in group II it was significant post treatment and at follow-up visits. No significant difference was detected in pain scores between the two groups. Grip strength was improved in both groups, but the differences between groups were not significant.

Conclusions: Patients in both groups improved after the interventions. Group II had better long-term results than group I. Low-level laser might be a useful modality in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphoedema.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2008 Aug;26(4):393-400.

Low-level laser therapy in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in young patients.

Abramoff MM, Lopes NN, Lopes LA, Dib LL, Guilherme A, Caran EM, Barreto AD, Lee ML, Petrilli AS.

Private practice, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract Objective: A pilot clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy (CT)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in young patients. Background Data: Besides compromising the patient’s nutrition and well-being, oral mucositis represents a portal of entry into the body for microorganisms present in the mouth, which may lead to sepsis if there is hematological involvement. Oncologic treatment tolerance decreases and systemic complications may arise that interfere with the success of cancer treatment. LLLT appears to be an interesting alternative to other approaches to treating OM, due to its trophic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing chemotherapy (22 cycles) without mucositis were randomized into a group receiving prophylactic laser-irradiation (group 1), and a group receiving placebo light treatment (group 2). Patients who had already presented with mucositis were placed in a group receiving irradiation for therapeutic purposes (group 3, with 10 cycles of CT). Serum granulocyte levels were taken and compared to the progression of mucositis. Results: In group 1, most patients (73%) presented with mucositis of grade 0 (p = 0.03 when compared with the placebo group), and 18% presented with grade 1. In group 2, 27% had no OM and did not require therapy. In group 3, the patients had marked pain relief (as assessed by a visual analogue scale), and a decrease in the severity of OM, even when they had severe granulocytopenia. Conclusion: The ease of use of LLLT, high patient acceptance, and the positive results achieved, make this therapy feasible for the prevention and treatment of OM in young patients.

Ann Oncol. 2007 Apr;18(4):639-46. Epub 2006 Oct 3

A systematic review of common conservative therapies for arm lymphoedema secondary to breast cancer treatment.

Moseley AL, Carati CJ, Piller NB.

School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. amanda.moseley@yahoo.com.au

Secondary arm lymphoedema is a chronic and distressing condition which affects a significant number of women who undergo breast cancer treatment. A number of health professional and patient instigated conservative therapies have been developed to help with this condition, but their comparative benefits are not clearly known. This systematic review undertook a broad investigation of commonly instigated conservative therapies for secondary arm lymphoedema including; complex physical therapy, manual lymphatic drainage, pneumatic pumps, oral pharmaceuticals, low level laser therapy, compression bandaging and garments, limb exercises and limb elevation. It was found that the more intensive and health professional based therapies, such as complex physical therapy, manual lymphatic drainage, pneumatic pump and laser therapy generally yielded the greater volume reductions, whilst self instigated therapies such as compression garment wear, exercises and limb elevation yielded smaller reductions. All conservative therapies produced improvements in subjective arm symptoms and quality of life issues, where these were measured. Despite the identified benefits, there is still the need for large scale, high level clinical trials in this area.

Lasers Med Sci. 2006 Jul;21(2):90-4. Epub 2006 May 4.

Low-level laser therapy in management of postmastectomy lymphedema.

Kaviani A, Fateh M, Yousefi Nooraie R, Alinagi-zadeh MR, Ataie-Fashtami L.

Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Iranian Center for Medical Laser Research, Tehran, Iran. akaviani@sina.tims.ac.ir

The aim of this paper was to study the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphedema. Eleven women with unilateral postmastectomy lymphedema were enrolled in a double-blind controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to laser and sham groups and received laser or placebo irradiation (Ga-As laser device with a wavelength of 890 nm and fluence of 1.5 J/cm2) over the arm and axillary areas. Changes in patients’ limb circumference, pain score, range of motion, heaviness of the affected limb, and desire to continue the treatment were measured before the treatment and at follow-up sessions (weeks 3, 9, 12, 18, and 22) and were compared to pretreatment values. Results showed that of the 11 enrolled patients, eight completed the treatment sessions. Reduction in limb circumference was detected in both groups, although it was more pronounced in the laser group up to the end of 22nd week. Desire to continue treatment at each session and baseline score in the laser group was greater than in the sham group in all sessions. Pain reduction in the laser group was more than in the sham group except for the weeks 3 and 9. No substantial differences were seen in other two parameters between the two treatment groups. In conclusion, despite our encouraging results, further studies of the effects of LLLT in management of postmastectomy lymphedema should be undertaken to determine the optimal physiological and physical parameters to obtain the most effective clinical response.

J Photochem Photobiol B. 2000 Dec;59(1-3):1-8.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) controlled outcome of side effects caused by ionizing radiation, treated with 780 nm-diode laser –preliminary results.

Schaffer M, Bonel H, Sroka R, Schaffer PM, Busch M, Sittek H, Reiser M, Duhmke E.
Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Munich, Germany.

sroka@life.med.uni-muenchen.de

BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVE: Ionizing radiation therapy by way of various beams such as electron, photon and neutron is an established method in tumor treatment. The side effects caused by this treatment such as ulcer, painful mastitis and delay of wound healing are well known, too. Biomodulation by low level laser therapy (LLLT) has become popular as a therapeutic modality for the acceleration of wound healing and the treatment of inflammation. Evidence for this kind of application, however, is not fully understood yet. This study intends to demonstrate the response of biomodulative laser treatment on the side effects caused by ionizing radiation by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). STUDY

DESIGN/PATIENTS and METHODS: Six female patients suffering from painful mastitis after breast ionizing irradiation and one man suffering from radiogenic ulcer were treated with lambda=780 nm diode laser irradiation at a fluence rate of 5 J/cm2. LLLT was performed for a period of 4-6 weeks (mean sessions: 25 per patient, range 19-35). The tissue response was determined by means of MRI after laser treatment in comparison to MRI prior to the beginning of the LLLT.

RESULTS: All patients showed complete clinical remission. The time-dependent contrast enhancement curve obtained by the evaluation of MR images demonstrated a significant decrease of enhancement features typical for inflammation in the affected area.

CONCLUSION: Biomodulation by LLLT seems to be a promising treatment modality for side effects induced by ionizing radiation.