3-20-17 4-3-3 Images NEW FLASH-COMBO-CELLUMA

To be prepared is half the victory!

All equipment pictured above and more (also re-pictured at the bottom of this post if the image above is incomplete) will likely be available for you to train and practice with in this course.  Healing Light Seminars will only offer a device if we ourselves are continuing to use it clinically and have found it effective, well made and to deliver value.

David Rindge and Healing Light Seminars have been practicing with and teaching energy-based therapies every year since 2002, continually updating treatment methods and equipment as new technology and information have become available.

Our goal over this seminar weekend is to provide you with everything you need to come from knowledge and strength with laser, light emitting diode and pulsed electromagnetic field therapies in your practice!

Day 1 focuses on theory, biological effects and essentials for treatment success.   You will have the opportunity for hands-on practice with state-of-the-art laser, laser needle acupuncture, light emitting diode and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy systems for the treatment of pain, head to toe.

In Day 2, you will learn how lasers, light emitting diodes and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy devices may be applied successfully in aesthetics / dermatology, cardiovascular disease, digestive, ear and eye disorders, gynecology, for hair regrowth, neuropathy, osteoporosis, respiratory disorders, sports medicine and much more.

Gain a solid understanding of the principles, technology and parameters of laser, laser needle, light emitting diode and pulsed electromagnetic therapies and the skills to apply them successfully in your practice!  NCCAOM 322-5, seven hours each day, Saturday and Sunday.  Learn More and Register Here

Course Date / Location

November 4-5, 2017.  SpringHill Suites Orlando Airport.  5828 Hazeltine National DriveOrlando, FL 32822. (407) 816-5533.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER HERE

Or call 321-751-7001.

Healing Light Seminars

Training in Energy-based Therapies since 2002

14 PDAs – NCCAOM 322-5

14 CEUs Florida Acupuncturists

3-20-17 4-3-3 Images NEW FLASH-COMBO-CELLUMA

NCCAOM emblem

Celluma Testimonials

Acne

”Every acne patient we have treated has seen results with the first Celluma acne treatment and signed up for a package, or bought the Celluma to use at home. I have seen other blue light treatments, but nothing has given results like this with the first treatment. Here is what one patient with chronic cystic acne for years emailed, “I loved the light! I love how my skin feels/looks. The redness has subsided a bit and my skin (where it’s clear) feels so smooth.” Dietary changes certainly help but take time and it is sometimes hard to get patient compliance, especially with teenagers. The Celluma offers a way for the patient to see real results immediately, and these patients refer others.” – Dr. Anne Dunev, Burbank, CA.

*********************

“My name is Jordan Watkins and I am a 17 year old student currently attending Laguna Beach High School. I play volleyball for the school and have practice every day during the week and sometimes even on the weekends. Although icing my joints and knees helps after practices, there is nothing better then what Celluma does. Celluma helps rid any pains I get in my knees or anywhere else after practices, games, tournaments, etc. Not only do I use Celluma for my joints, but also for my face. As a 17 year old boy who is constantly sweating from practice, I do get acne. Once I began to use Celluma every night on my face, I could see immediate results the next morning. The product has changed not only my appearance, but also my life.” – Jordan W, Laguna Beach, CA.

*********************

”Adult acne haunted me for three years; I tried every product on the market. Often I had temporary success with expensive topical treatments, but nothing lasted. Using the Celluma daily healed my skin. After two weeks my cystic acne that spread across my face had diminished dramatically, eliminating deep painful blemishes. After six weeks I did not have inflamed acne blemishes. I have had clear skin for a year now; Celluma gave me my life back!” – Carley – New York, NY.

*********************

“I had the chance to do a trial with the Celluma, and it worked so well for us, I am buying two– one for home, and one for my daughter with severe acne who goes to school out of state (she was home during our trial period, so we tried it on her). My husband used it on a sore knee and insists it feels better; he also used it on some scars on his arm along with CherlyLee MD TrueLipids Cream (chronic ones that just recently began healing up, not old ones he had had since he was little), and the scars have gotten much better. Not sure if it was the lights or the TrueLipids, but the scars do look better. My mom also tried the Celluma on her hands and shoulders for very bad arthritis and she feels like it really made a difference. My daughter has been on oral medication for severe, scarring acne for a good ten years, and finally decided she didn’t want to keep putting that in to her body. She was only able to try the Celluma a couple of times, but when she did, her face was noticeably better the next day. I really think that if she uses it regularly, it will make a huge difference for her, and it will be easier than getting her to the derm every other week for treatment. I am excited to get these and start using them and see what they can do”. – Mickey J. UT.

*********************

“I use the Celluma for my face to clear acne. It sure is convenient to spend thirty minutes under a light instead of spending thirty minutes having your face poked at with a needle and then drenched in chemicals.” – Willie, Orange, CA.

*********************

“Hi, I wanted to let you know that my husband and I are personally OBSESSED with the Celluma, it has helped our pain and my acne so much that we cannot believe it!!!!!” – Tari Dominy Sicairos de Vomaske. Owner, Allure Skincare & Lash, Denver, CO.

*********************

Anti-Aging

*********************

“I couldn’t be more pleased with the results from my Celluma, personally and professionally. It’s an amazing enhancement for all of our facial protocols from anti-aging to acne prevention.

Additionally, your tech support in assisting with questions as they arise has been an incredible asset. Though I felt I was well trained and well versed on LED previously; owning a Celluma and having the benefit of Biophotas staff to call upon, as needed, has been like a Masters Class in LED technology. I’m so grateful that every time I have a question, you and your staff are always so prompt with a reply. I’m honored and grateful for you and your time, knowledge and support. Your hard work and honest, straightforward approach is part of the beauty of what I love so much about your staff and company. It is how I approach my own life and business!

Celluma exceeds my expectations significantly. Lastly, I would like to provide some feedback on the packaging; this was one of the best examples I have ever seen in careful, mindful, strategic and safe shipping. I could not be more pleased.” – Nicholle Bertino, L.E. Benessere Skin Care, Santa Monica, CA

***************************

“My aesthetic practice has found the Celluma panel very effective for anti-aging. We have incorporated the light therapy as part of our multi-modality care as pre and post treatment for facial rejuvenation surgery and in conjunction with our overall skin care management.” – Samuel Shatkin Jr., MD FACS Member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons. Aesthetic Associate Centre Plastic Surgery & Advanced Medical Skincare. New York.

*********************

“I have a clinical aesthetics practice, “Pampered Skin Studio”, in Tucson, AZ, within a physician’s office. The Celluma has been a great addition to my aesthetics repertoire and is the star ingredient of my “Anti-Aging Signature Facial”. I also encourage a series of six LED treatments for those clients who really want to see the long term benefits of LED. My acne clients are also seeing excellent results”.  –  Suzanne Pear, RN PhD CIC LE COE (registered nurse-  aesthetician specializing in corrective skin care).

*********************

“I was a bit hesitant at investing in a Celluma, but I shouldn’t have hesitated; I couldn’t be happier. The results are fast and remarkable. My clients love it. I love it. On another note, the customer service is beyond amazing. They are quick to respond to questions and inquiries and beyond friendly! Thanks for transforming my business!” – Jenny Zarate Licensed Esthetician, Montara, CA.

*********************

“I love my Celluma! I ordered my LED therapy panel after a severe injury left me bed-ridden for months. I’ve noticed an increase in my progress and pain management since using it. I’ve been using it on my face as well. It always puts me in the deepest, calmest trance”. – Jessie Ennis, Actor (Veep) & Director, Los Angeles, California.

*********************

“I’ve been utilizing LED for years but the Celluma panel has made the treatment oh so much easier. You do need to have LED very close to tissue which is why the Celluma is a lifesaver. Love, love, love the ability to wash, scrub, extract, LED, treat, mask, etc, etc, and be done. The results are fantastic!” – Trecy Marr LE. Trinity Esthetics.

*********************

“As an aesthetician for over twenty years, I’m always on the lookout for new technologies and new devices to use in my work. I purchased Celluma about two years ago and it has proved to be one of the best investments I’ve made in my business. My initial use of Celluma was for stubborn acne, but I have found that the blue LED is also extremely calming for skin after waxing. The device helps to create a relaxing spa atmosphere for clients and has proved helpful at home for aches, arthritis and overtaxed muscles. On top of all of that, the equipment is light and portable, so it is never cumbersome to use. I couldn’t be more pleased with my

purchase.”  – Urszula, Alexksandra’s European Skin Care – Commack, NY.

*********************

“Your light, hands down, is the best esthetics product I have ever purchased!” – Sherri Lynn, L.E. Bartlesville – OK.

*********************

“Shout out to Celluma! I have to try everything on myself to be a believer and before marketing it to my clients. I have not had a sustained luminous glow since winter in NJ started. Even with products, treatments etc. This happens to me every winter because of the cold outdoors and forced hot air indoors. I used my new Celluma panel twice this week and looking in the mirror…there it was – that healthy glow! :), and my moisture/oil balance seemed to be consistent for 24 hrs post use. Looking forward to the long term effects”. – Joy Papaioannou, RN/NCEA cert./Esthetician. Owner of Choose Joy Skin, Matawan of Monmouth County NJ.

*********************

“My clients love the Celluma! And so do I! The results I have seen in my acne clients is

 amazing!” – Teresa, Owner – Natural Faces ~ Organic Skincare Treatments, Huntington, NY.

*********************

“I had the chance to do a trial with the Celluma, and it worked so well for us, I am buying two– one for home, and one for my daughter with severe acne who goes to school out of state (she was home during our trial period, so we tried it on her). My husband used it on a sore knee and insists it feels better; he also used it on some scars on his arm along with Cheryl Lee M.D. TrueLipids Cream (chronic ones that just recently began healing up, not old ones he had had since he was little), and the scars have gotten much better. Not sure if it was the lights or the TrueLipids, but the scars do look better. My mom also tried the Celluma on her hands and shoulders for very bad arthritis and she feels like it really made a difference. My daughter has been on oral medication for severe, scarring acne for a good ten years, and finally decided she didn’t want to keep putting that in to her body. She was only able to try the Celluma a couple of times, but when she did, her face was noticeably better the next day. I really think that if she uses it regularly, it will make a huge difference for her, and it will be easier than getting her to the derm every other week for treatment. I am excited to get these and start using them and see what they can do”. – Mickey J. UT.

*********************

“I purchased Celluma for a number of reasons. First, the affordability, then the versatility. I love how all the light spectrums run in the background on all the applications. I plan on using it mainly for my skin care practice that is largely directed toward oncology clients. I knew I wanted Celluma before I attended the Ft. Lauderdale IECSC show. The bonus that I got, was a company that is super supportive and truly values the relationship and success of the professionals with whom they associate. A company like yours, who is so willing to help make their partners successful and the clients who benefit from the treatments, is hard to come by. In an environment where corporations are acquiring multiple skin care companies, and big business has compromised relationships, it is refreshing to know that BioPhotas is committed to the success of the aesthetic professional. I know Celluma is going to be a huge part of my practice!” – Bea Erdman, Remedies Clinical Skin Care Mgmt LLC, Tampa, FL.

*********************

“This is the best beauty and therapy product I have ever experienced. My Celluma is 3 years old and I use it four times a week for beauty, aches, back problems and pain relief” – Sally P. – NY, NY.

*********************

“I love my Celluma! It paid for itself in a week! At my spa, we charge $2 per minute under the light with a minimum of 10 minutes. We also sell packages that are discounted the more they buy. With our spa specializing in acne treatments, the Celluma was the perfect addition to our menu. We are able to achieve quicker results and amazing healing benefits. Client always ask “when can we do the light again” because they love it so much!” – Miranda Jeremiah Alder. Owner/Aesthetician at Bliss Spa and Beauty Lounge, Clovis, New Mexico.

*********************

“I LOVE my Celluma! Such amazing and quick results when I use it during my facials!” – Andrea Minor, L.E. Henderson, NV.

*********************

“Since incorporating Celluma into my cosmetic surgery practice, my patients have enjoyed significant reduction in inflammation and bruising as a result of using the Celluma post operatively. Personally, I use it regularly, and swear by it, for pain relief for an old back injury”.

–      Dr. Jesse Mitchell, M.D., Board Certified Dermatologist, Diplomate, American Board of Cosmetic Surgery.

*********************

“Would love to share something super nice!!! I have a friend who was my teacher in aesthetic beauty school. This past February she had surgery on the back of her right heel and the stitches were not done correctly and flush to the heel…looked bumpy and uneven and even after showing her surgeon how bad it had looked – and she was in constant pain – and the color of the area was blue and purple, his response was everything has been done as your last surgery and I don’t understand why you are still in pain!! Well fast forward, this month (July), I got her to come twice a week and put her heel under Celluma Aches & Pains setting. After her 3rd visit her co-workers mentioned she was walking normal and the color of her skin had evened out and the scar tissue was getting a much smoothened appearance and the swelling was much diminished and pain was also much lessened. When she used to get home from work, she would always have to elevate her legs and ice and take pain killers…..NOT ANY MORE!! Could not wait to report this exciting news! Celluma has saved me also in the last 2 weeks when I had a pinched nerve in my neck and a pulled muscle in my right front rib!! LONG LIVE CELLUMA!!!”

–   Sunita Aggarwal, Owner & Licensed Esthetician, Threading By Sunita, Hyannis, MA.

 

*********************

“I think the selling point for a business owner is once you buy it (Celluma), there are no further costs to you! No products necessary, nothing. 100% profit, every single dollar. That’s way more profitable than any product or machine that uses product. Technology is a game-changer that way. Plus visible, palpable results, which drives sales.” – Lindsey Flint, LE & Owner – Sweet Cheeks Skincare of San Francisco.

*********************

“Hi, I wanted to let you know that my husband and I are personally OBSESSED with the Celluma, it has helped our pain and my acne so much that we cannot believe it!!!!!” – Tari Dominy Sicairos de Vomaske. Owner, Allure Skincare & Lash, Denver, CO.

 

*********************

“I received my CELLUMA yesterday!!! It’s nothing short of a miracle!! I was my own first “guinea pig” and today I gave a complimentary service for my long standing good client after I did derma planning also for the first time for her…and, DRUM ROLL PLEASEEEEE…it blew her socks off…to see a 62 year-old fairly good skin look bouncy like a baby’s bum…if I may expand…she had red spots that went away, dark circles looked diminished. I used it on absolutely bare skin after cleaning and DermPlanning. HER SKIN WAS RADIANT like she was in the spot light!! Thanks is an understatement!” – Sunita, Board Certified Aesthetician, Beauty Pros Day Spa, Hyannis, MA.

*********************

“I freakin’ love my Celluma and so do my clients. I just introduced it and it’s paid for already! I sent out a newsletter on Thurs last week to introduce it and offered an introductory special of a single treatment for $65 (reg. $75) and a series of 6 for $330 (reg. $65) only good for the month of February. Sold 4 pkg’s, a single treatment and an add-on for $35 so far” – Kellie Spiak Campbell Bacchus LE – Advanced Skin Treatments, Skin Care & Acne Clinic, NY.

*********************

“I specialize in the treatment of acne and I ALWAYS end each treatment with 15 minutes under the Celluma panel. It helps speed healing as well as helping to reduce inflammation after extractions. It has also been indispensable in the clearing of post in-inflammatory hyperpigmentation on the face and body”. – Cyndi Jarvis, LE/Owner at Saving Faces, Concord, NH.

*********************

“I have used my Celluma twice each day since it arrived. I love using it on my feet as they are always a little sore. I am sure it is arthritis. In addition, it is great on my face. The texture is improving already”. – Sally, OC, CA.

*********************

“I love my Celluma – Bella Forza NYC has been so busy since I started using it! It paid itself off in such a short time and my clients come in just for this service!  Thanks!!” – Bella Forza NYC, 1036 Park Ave Suite 1B, New York, New York.

*********************

“I’ve had chronic neck pain for 15 years since someone, carrying me over their shoulder, slipped on ice and dropped me on my head. The result was 3 bulging discs. I used to use pain patches every night. Then, I got my Celluma and after only two treatments the patches were gone!” – Shari Oberst L.E. Skin & Body Works, Racine WI.

*********************

“I LOVE Celluma! One of my favorite necessities to my treatment room! I have been a licensed Esthetician for 9 years and have no idea how I lived without this before! I have clients with acne and Celluma helped rid and smooth out the texture. Clients with aging skin, their skin starts looking firmer & tighter. Many clients call this my “magic light,” because to them it really is magic! I could go on and on about the stories and positive results with this device, but that would be too much to read. Lastly, you can have a good product, but the customer service and

 

support is on par as well (which can be hard to find), every time I call in to ask a question, everyone is so helpful & friendly. I would highly recommend trying a treatment with Celluma or buying the device”. – Elyse Helene L.E. Love Skin Nashville, Nashville, TN.

Pain

“In the eight months that I’ve been using the Celluma my life has become more enjoyable. My combat injuries, pain, discomforts and surgeries that I’ve been dealing with over the years have become more manageable. I’ve also been able to postpone additional surgeries, because along with other treatments, the Celluma has stimulated a comfortable healing process that has assisted me to live a more painless life. Thank you again for introducing me to the Celluma Pad. Strength and Honor.”  – S. Sgt. Jim Gularte, Vietnam Sniper, USMC (retired).

*********************

“I love my Celluma! I ordered my LED therapy panel after a severe injury left me bed-ridden for months. I’ve noticed an increase in my progress and pain management since using it. I’ve been using it on my face as well. It always puts me in the deepest, calmest trance”. – Jessie Ennis, Actor (Veep) & Director, Los Angeles, California.

*********************

“I had the chance to do a trial with the Celluma, and it worked so well for us, I am buying two– one for home, and one for my daughter with severe acne who goes to school out of state (she was home during our trial period, so we tried it on her). My husband used it on a sore knee and insists it feels better; he also used it on some scars on his arm along with CherlyLee MD TrueLipids Cream (chronic ones that just recently began healing up, not old ones he had had since he was little), and the scars have gotten much better. Not sure if it was the lights or the TrueLipids, but the scars do look better. My mom also tried the Celluma on her hands and shoulders for very bad arthritis and she feels like it really made a difference. My daughter has been on oral medication for severe, scarring acne for a good ten years, and finally decided she didn’t want to keep putting that in to her body. She was only able to try the Celluma a couple of times, but when she did, her face was noticeably better the next day. I really think that if she uses it regularly, it will make a huge difference for her, and it will be easier than getting her to the derm every other week for treatment. I am excited to get these and start using them and see what they can do”. – Mickey J. UT

*********************

“I love the Cellumas! They work so amazing! “ – Dr. Jennifer Meng, D.C. Grafton, OH Case History 1  (Dr. Meng)

A 48 year old female had hip dysplasia at birth. Her shoulders were also slightly malformed. At 48 she experienced the right shoulder freezing up with almost no motion. This was the second time she experienced this with the right shoulder. She saw multiple caregivers, MDs, DCs, PTs, Massotherapists, etc without any relief. She was totally restricted in ADLs and the pain was so severe that her sleep was disrupted several times a night.  After using the Celluma for one

week, her PT said that he was able to get increased ROM for the first time. After 2 weeks, the pain was greatly diminished and no longer interrupted her sleep. She continued to improve and it has now been almost 5 months and she has almost full ROM and no pain. She uses the Celluma on it now only occasionally.

Case History 2 (Dr. Meng)

A 19 Year old female was injured in a farming accident. A disc pulled by a tractor ran over her foot while she was on an ATV. She had Crocs on her feet. The bottom of her foot was torn up by the saw toothed edge of the foot rests. There was also a deep cut on the top. X-Rays were negative for a fracture. The foot was dressed with Lavender essential oil and a Spenco burn dressing. 1-2 times a day the Celluma was used.  After only 5 days the young woman could walk barefoot on the foot and the second picture shows it 2 weeks after the injury. The cut on the top of the foot was deep. There was so much swelling initially that she could not bend the ankle or the foot. There was also a lot of bruising on the top of the foot. The bruising all cleared up within 48 hours using the Celluma. The edema also diminished significantly, although it was a little slower as she was up and using the foot so soon. – Dr. Jennifer Meng,

D.C. Grafton, OH.

*********************

“In 2006, I was combat wounded with over 100 pieces of shrapnel all over my body.  Today I deal with soft tissue, bone, and neurological related pain and discomfort all of the time. As a Navy Corpsman I understand, and have seen the results of, long-term medical drug use and I personally go out of my way to avoid taking any myself. I have used the Celluma now for about 8 months, and I Iike that it can be used as needed, with results that are equal to, or better, than taking a pain management drug. The Celluma also manages breakouts similar to acne, which develop on the back of my neck. With one use, it is often 50-90% better by the next day. The Celluma puts my mind at ease (with regard to pain management and acne breakouts) that I am not going to have to take a pill or use ointments for the rest of my life”. – Aaron Q Seibert HMC(FMF/AW) USN (ret). (Purple Heart 2006) Wounded Warrior Liaison.

*********************

“I’d like to tell you about this product that I have been testing out, it’s called Celluma, from BioPhotas, Inc. I am not a Doctor and this is not a sales ad, just my experience and others who have told me about their experience with this device.

Parker Jones (member of the Jones motocross racing family) while working with an end mill – tore his tendon and had nerve damage, Parker used this Celluma pad on his hand and reported “it’s crazy, but that it works!” It definitely worked and helped him recover.

Dave Carlson (5 times world Mini Champion) had his palm ripped to the bone while using a grinder, in 4 weeks he was able to use his hand again while using Celluma pad every day for a ½ hour. His daughter had a C section while giving birth, she used the Celluma on her scar, she now has no scar.

As for myself; my back has been killing me, I have been using the Celluma every night. Now I can get out of bed without pain in the morning and am able to get work done again. I also had some knee tissue damage, and since using the Celluma it’s now almost completely gone. Again this is my own experience and others that have shared their experiences with me, the best part is; it is 100% made in the USA. I LIKE IT. If the rate card has 10 score as the best, then I give it a 10!!” – Marty Tripes, San Diego, California. Mr. Tripes was a leading AMA motocross and Supercross rider of the 1970s and early 1980s. He is remembered for winning the Super Bowl of Motocross at the Los Angeles Coliseum in July 1972, just a few weeks after turning 16. That race was considered the first true stadium Supercross race in America. Tripes also won the first FIM 250cc United States Motocross Grand Prix at Unadilla, New York in 1978. He was described as one of the most naturally talented motocross riders in history. His win at the Super Bowl of Motocross against some of the best riders in the world when he was only 16 years old launched his career. He won a total of 11 National Championship races during his career. Tripes was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2001.

*********************

“I have been in the Marine Corps, Military Police for 15 years, most of that time on the SWAT team or deployed. I have had chronic lower back pain that started from when I attended Jump School in 2001. Throughout my career Navy Medicine was tried to help me with pain but nothing has helped, until about a month ago, when Steven Lubich started letting me use the Celluma device that he owns. I have only used it for about a month and the results are amazing. After the first 30-minute session my lower back felt like it hasn’t in years. I noticed I wasn’t experiencing the tightness nor pain I always feel after exercising or performing my duties on my job. I highly recommend that Navy Medicine uses this device and especially with the wounded warriors. I will still continue to use the Celluma on a day to day basis”. – SSgt Corral, Nicholas S.

2/3rd Plt Sgt

Law Enforcement Liaison Alpha Company

Wounded Warrior Battalion West

*********************

“My husband has used the Celluma for three days in a row on multiple body parts and he is happy to report that the unrelenting heel pain is decreasing. Happy Day!!! The left wrist gets used and abused quite a bit, but he has more hope now that his guitar playing days won’t be over and he will be able to continue to make art with his hands. Update: when my husband got out of bed this morning, his heel pain wasn’t there…for the first time in, well, we can’t remember how long…. with only 8 consecutive days of using the Celluma!! Thank you so very much!” – Dr Beth Kiser, Family Wellness Chiropractic Center, 1875 North Ridge Road, Suite A, Lorain Ohio 44055.

*********************

“In the winter of 2008, I was in a horrible MRAP accident in Iraq, that is when my life started spiraling down a long painful road. I didn’t know it at the time, but came to find out that I had herniated my L4 and L5 discs, which caused me to have nerve damage in my spine. My knees are shot from the constant running I used to do, and all the training I had done and been through. At one point, I was slated to go to Marine Special Operations Battalion and do what I do best. But due to tearing my labrum in my shoulder during training for that position, I had to give it up. But with every door that closes a new one opens… I earned a job working with General Mills as a Personal Security Officer in Afghanistan for 13 months so I pushed out on that but was in pain day-in and day-out. But it wasn’t going to stop me from doing what I loved. When I returned in the beginning of 2011 my body was done. I tried to take time to get my body back but was sent off on Recruiting Duty. I did as I was told, and while on Recruiting Duty I tried to get my body back in-shape but just couldn’t make it happen. After four years of unsuccessful treatment, I was sent to the Wounded Warrior Battalion to heal up and hopefully get back in the fight. Unfortunately, after numerous procedures and operations I was unable to get back to fighting mode and was retired from the Corps on Jan 30, 2014. On Jan 10, I was afforded the opportunity to use the Celluma device and have never looked back! I can honestly say that due to that AWESOME piece of gear I have made a tremendous turn around in my life. Since using the device 30 mins-a-day every day, I have been able to go to work full-time selling cars and being on my feet for 12 hours a day. I could only honestly stand for about 45 minutes to an hour before I got the Celluma device. I have been able to play with my two year old son non-stop with no pain and be the dad I should be. I have started going back to the gym and have lost 12 pounds since being on the Celluma device. On top of all that, I have done the one thing that I haven’t been able to do in years – which is RUN. I am up to a mile and a half without stopping and it is all because of the Celluma device. I wish that the corps and navy medicine would have adopted this when it first came out so I could still be a Marines Marine. But things are for the better now and I am HAPPY.

I hope that this gives an understanding as to how the Celluma has helped change my life. I will never give up on anything and the Celluma has given me the chance to do anything!!! THANK YOU BioPhotas, I am forever in your debt and if you ever need anything from me I will be there for you as you were for me”. –  Sgt. Steven Lubich,  Semper Fidelis, San Diego, CA.

*********************

“I used the Celluma during my recovery from a total shoulder replacement. After one year, I have recovered a greater than expected range of motion, AND, the surgery scar has virtually disappeared where the Celluma was directly applied”. – Jeff R. Huntington Beach, CA.

*********************

“My name is Jordan Watkins and I am a 17 year old student currently attending Laguna Beach High School. I play volleyball for the school and have practice every day during the week and sometimes even on the weekends. Although icing my joints and knees helps after practices, there is nothing better then what Celluma does. Celluma helps rid any pains I get in my knees or anywhere else after practices, games, tournaments, etc. Not only do I use Celluma for my joints, but also for my face. As a 17 year old boy who is constantly sweating from practice, I do get acne. Once I began to use Celluma every night on my face, I could see immediate results the next morning. The product has changed not only my appearance, but also my life.” – Jordan W, Laguna Beach, CA.

*********************

“I am so impressed with the results from just two times I used Celluma. I used it the same day for 30mins each time back to back! I had been experiencing mild low back left side pain for weeks as a result of 2-4 hours of daily driving I do, but I am happy to say that it’s now been 5 days and the pain is gone! I tried other devices such as PEMF and Ionic Therapy the week prior to trying Celluma and the pain went away for a couple hours after the use of each device only to return later the same day… I am looking forward to continue to explore the benefits Celluma on my body. Thank you Celluma!” – Alfredo M, Dana Point, CA.

*********************

“I badly sprained by right ankle on Wednesday. I stepped off a step wrong and hit the step below with the outside of my right foot and as I started to fall I heard a loud pop at my ankle. I did not hit the ground but my ankle sure did hurt. I could hardly bear weight on it. I sat on the step for a few minutes then went in the house. I used the Celluma on it about a 30 minutes later. Then I used it again right away. I slept for about 30 minutes, then used it again for another two cycles–2 hours total. The next morning I had no swelling or bruising. By the end of the day I could bear full weight on it. Yesterday and today are gradually improving and tomorrow I plan to pack up Christmas in a 17 foot U-Haul and take it all to storage with my 2 boys. Unbelievable!” – M. Allen DC, NMD, Orange County, CA.

*********************

“I have been involved in Masters Weight Lifting and have found the Celluma most helpful to shorten my recovery times between weight lifting sessions. During my work out 2 months ago, I blew my rotator cuff in the right shoulder, requiring a surgical repair. I continued my Celluma usage both before and after the surgery. I was instructed not to exercise for several weeks after the surgery and then start physical therapy. The results I experienced were truly amazing. You could tell by the doctor’s facial expression that he did not understand what was going on. Not usually what you want to see from your surgeon! It was the same with the physical therapist…I kept asking for more exercise and resistance – and they kept looking at me with a bewildered stare. While I am not back to my original strength levels yet, I am months ahead of what they thought was possible. After only six weeks I have full range of motion with no pain, and my strength is building daily. I am thrilled with the results and credit much of my accelerated recovery rate to my Celluma”. Mike – Newport Beach, CA.

 

*********************

“Here’s how the Celluma helped out “Brownie”, a female pit bull. “Brownie” has had 3 separate surgeries on her hind knees for torn muscles. After the third surgery, “Brownie” was healing much slower than the previous two surgeries and she had a lot of pain and stiffness in her knees. We started using the Celluma on her knees on all 3 settings every week. Even after just one treatment, we noticed a huge improvement in her mobility and she was not in as much pain. Her wounds and scars healed much quicker after using the Celluma using the “Anti-Aging” setting. She also had an infection in one of the surgery sites and when we used the Celluma on the “Acne” setting it helped to clear up the infection much quicker. Brownie was not as stiff after using the Celluma on the “Aches and Pains” setting. Using the Celluma on “Brownie” has made a dramatic improvement in her recovery after having multiple knee surgeries.” – Debra Olson-Warford, DC, Certified Animal Chiropractor, Lancaster, CA.

*********************

The Celluma has been a valuable addition to my practice. It’s simplicity of use requires minimal attention from my assistants and my patients can be in complete control of the process. We have all been impressed with how a variety of conditions respond favorably to treatment with the Celluma. Several people have used it for pain control. Their first experience is the comfortable warmth that seems to penetrate to the core of their pain.  A few other people have experienced benefit with their complexion. One 19 year old girl said she felt an immediate toning of her skin that was refreshing. And a 17 year old boy used it on his legs for a follicular dermatitis issue and it cleared up after a short time.Dr. Michael Allen, Functional Neurologist & Chiropractor, Health Builders, Laguna Hills, CA.

*********************

“Since incorporating Celluma into my cosmetic surgery practice, my patients have enjoyed significant reduction in inflammation and bruising as a result of using the Celluma post operatively. Personally, I use it regularly, and swear by it, for pain relief for an old back injury”.

– Dr. Jesse Mitchell, M.D., Board Certified Dermatologist, Diplomate, American Board of Cosmetic Surgery.

*********************

I fell on my right knee a year ago and it was BAD! I used the Celluma on it for 2 days and it was like new after that. My father was here and could NOT believe the difference in my knee, Celluma literally made the knee look 100% in 2 days and fully functioning in a week.

Over the course of the next 4 months, I fell two more times on the same knee.  In the meantime, I gave my Celluma to my daughter to use on her acne.  My knee was so bad that I was forced to stop hiking (one of my falls was during a hike), playing golf, and working out. My hip was being thrown out because of my knee, and I couldn’t wear heels. I got my new Celluma in September and went right to work on my skin and my hand (Arthritis), but for some reason, didn’t think to put it on my knee. I was complaining to my Dad and he made a comment about the Celluma not working this time…then I realized wasn’t using it on my knee and I should be!

So, I used the Celluma every day for 3 straight weeks on my knee and I am amazed at the healing that has occurred. I am back with my personal trainer, I am hiking AND, can now wear heels again!  All that in 3 weeks!  I thought I was doomed to wear flats forever!

 

As a recipient of it’s wonderful healing, thank you for all you do to promote the Celluma! – Shelley, Anaheim, CA.

*********************

“Turns out I had an upper thorasic release, last week, that had a dramatic affect and I am 90% improved. The Celluma helped me win sleep time when nothing else would touch my exhausting shoulder and back pain from the inflammation in my spine and limb joints”. – David, Tustin, CA.

*********************

“I have used my Celluma twice each day since it arrived. I love using it on my feet as they are always a little sore. I am sure it is arthritis. In addition, it is great on my face. The texture is improving already”. – Sally, Orange County, CA.

*********************

“I have been using the Celluma for three weeks on a regular basis, on both upper arms and shoulders. The results have been amazing. I compete in weight lifting, where I am constantly stressing the joints, tendons and muscles. I have been accepting the pain and soreness as just something I would have to accept. No more, since using the device the discomfort is much more manageable and shorter in duration. It seems that my recovery times have decreased at the same time. Thank you, I really appreciate your recommendation regarding Celluma.” – Mike, Newport Beach, CA.

*********************

“I had major shoulder surgery in April and was not allowed any mobility for six weeks. I did however use the Celluma on a regular basis. I was allowed to start limited PT in early June (it has become my second home). I was finally allowed more aggressive PT in August. I had 8 session in Steamboat and when we left (August 25) my range of motion was 40 degrees. We took a two week driving trip when I did not have PT but used the Celluma almost daily. Upon returning to PT here in OC, my range of motion was 57 degrees! I did my exercises but I was doing them all along.  The therapist here was truly impressed and the only thing I can really

 

credit the extended range of motion during my PT hiatus is the light therapy! You better believe I am using it as often as possible! Thrilled beyond words! Thank you!!” Heidi, NY.

*********************

“My wife reports that her knee is “so happy” while sitting under the Celluma. She was able to do “Pigeon Pose” in Yoga for the first time in months following 2 weeks of using the Celluma and I was able to sleep better last night after using it. We are loving our Celluma!” – Jeff, Orange County, CA.

*********************

“I have recently begun to use Celluma on my knee which has given me problems on and off for years. I immediately noticed a marked difference in my comfort level doing everyday things and working out. I believe the use of Celluma has begun a healing process and has delivered remarkable pain reduction, increased range of motion and ability to perform weight bearing exercise”.  – Patti, OC, California.

*********************

“I am an 89 year-old woman and suffer from chronic arthritis. I had the opportunity to try the Celluma by BioPhotas, and I was astounded by the relief I received! After one 30-minute session on my shoulder, I had full and pain-fee range of motion. I then tried a session on my very arthritic and painful hands. I awakened the next morning with full range of motion of all ten fingers, which was a first-time experience in many years.” – Meredith, Long Beach, CA.

*********************

“I used the device last night on my knee that’s been bothering me for a couple of weeks and it really worked extremely well. Took down the swelling and pain and my knee felt fine this morning—-after only one use!” – Mike, Cowan Heights, CA.

 

*********************

“I have been using my Celluma every day since I picked it up. I love it! It’s Perfect! I find the best way to use it on my lower Thoracic area is lying face down in my face cradle on my massage table. Today I used it on my lower back sitting in my chair working on the

computer.  Works great! My back is doing so much better”.   – Sharon, Costa Mesa, CA.

*********************

“I am having so good results with my Celluma. I have 3 gals using it every day and they are all seeing results for different issues. I am happy with the results for myself as well and even tho it is not FDA approved for cellulite, at least in my case, I am seeing fairly dramatic results. I use it 4-5 times a week and in 4 weeks time I can visually see a big difference.  This is speaking volumes to all the ladies that have been watching me.” – Shelley, Anaheim, CA.

*********************

“Following bi-lateral facial surgery, I decided to use the Celluma on one side of my face only. My plastic surgeon suggested the right side as it was visibly more swollen and angry.  Ten weeks post surgery, my right ear has healed much faster and is now completely healed. My left ear, without the use of Celluma, is still very bruised and swollen”. – P. E, Laguna Beach, CA.

*********************

While playing rugby for 25 years I experienced several injuries and developed painful herniations between C5, C6 and C7.  In an effort to get comfortable, I routinely slept on the same side every night. As a result, I also developed bursitis in one shoulder. To relieve the depilating neck pain and 90% loss of strength in one arm I recently underwent discectomy and spinal fusion surgery.  It was around this time I was introduced to the Celluma and began using it to relieve the pain and inflammation caused by the bursitis. It worked well, and I experienced considerable relief after using it for about 10 days . I also used it following my neck surgery to assist with tissue repair. At my 2 week post-surgery follow-up, the nurse who was removing the 20 stapled sutures exclaimed “This thing is completely healed! I’ve never seen this before!”

–     Kevin, Senior Medical Device Executive, OC, CA.

********************

The Celluma was a huge help when I really needed one. I recently had my wrist fused following 35+ years of chronic pain and I was not prepared for the amount of trauma involved in the procedure. I began using the Celluma and began feeling relief the next day. My doctor commented on how nicely the fusion was coming along and said that I must have exceptional blood supply to my wrist. While observing my x-ray during subsequent visits, he mentioned several times that this was the result they strive to achieve with this procedure. How much can is attributable to the Celluma use and how much to my doing absolutely nothing is hard to say, but I highly recommend the Celluma and am a big fan.

I can also state that the five inch scar on my right wrist has healed nicer than any surgery I’ve ever had…and I’ve had a few. – Steve Bauer,  Motor Sports Journalist.

*********************

 

“I am very impressed with the Celluma. A few weeks ago I drove from California to Rochester, NY to take a car to my daughter. By the time I finished, my right knee was in great pain and I could hardly walk. Unfortunately, I did not come straight back, and I lived on Advil and a heating pad for a few days, which did not do much. When I got back to LA, I tried the Celluma on my knee. After one treatment, it felt 80% better. I waited two days and then did another treatment and the pain is basically gone!” – Jim, Los Angeles, CA.

 

*********************

”I was struggling with a lot of major pain in both my neck and down my back. I had a back massage earlier, but after 24 hours it still hurt. I had no relief. I could not move or turn. My friend mentioned she had a similar problem and used her Celluma continuously 3 times in a row and it was solved. She said, you should try it tonight when you get home. I used it twice wrapping it around the back of my shoulder and neck. It was perfect, I had not one pain no matter how I turned. You have one great product there, I am so grateful. Thank you for my Celluma!” – Sally, New York.

*********************

“After taking multiple amounts of Advil for my shoulder pain, my son asked me why I wasn’t using Celluma. Duh….needless to say, I used it the entire weekend and I can now sit down and type without the pain I felt last week. I had used it only for my face until last Saturday. It really worked well. This morning I’m able to get total mobility back in my right arm and shoulder.

Hooray!” – Emily, Laguna Beach, CA.

*********************

“I woke up this morning with excruciating lower back pain. The last couple of days, my back has been hurting, I wasn’t at home and didn’t have my Celluma with me, so when I got home late last night, I got in my massage chair to try to get it adjusted. It worked I guess, but overnight while I was sleeping, my back got really stiff and hurt to the point where I couldn’t hardly walk this morning. At lunch, I laid on my stomach with the Celluma in Aches & Pains mode across my lower back. After that, it loosened up quite a bit. Then I did it again while I was sitting upright in a chair, and my back is back to 90% of normal. Amazing results with the Aches & Pains program!”  – Mike Abbey, Spa Owner. Broken Arrow, OK.

 

*********************

 

“I am a Doctor of Chiropractic who has lots of physical pain; fibromyalgia, severe arthritis in my hands and a degenerated right hip. I also cannot take NSAIDs due to a history of a bleeding ulcer. So many nights my leg pain makes it impossible to sleep. When I use the Celluma on my hip and right leg, it lessens the pain and allows me to fall asleep. Without the Celluma I wouldn’t be able to get the rest I need and perform I work I do”. – N. Rowan Richards. D.C. Monrovia, CA.

*********************

“This is the best beauty and therapy product I have ever experienced. My Celluma is 3 years old and I use it four times a week for beauty, aches, back problems and pain relief” – Sally P. – NY, NY.

*********************

Breast Cancer

Lasers Med Sci. 2016 Dec;31(9):1775-1782. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

The effects of low-level laser irradiation on breast tumor in mice and the expression of Let-7a, miR-155, miR-21, miR125, and miR376b.

Khori V1, Alizadeh AM2, Gheisary Z3, Farsinejad S3, Najafi F4, Khalighfard S3, Ghafari F3, Hadji M3, Khodayari H3.

Author information

  • 1Ischemic Disorders Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran.
  • 2Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Zip Code: 1419733141. aalizadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.
  • 3Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Zip Code: 1419733141.
  • 4Medical Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amir Kabir University, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a form of photon therapy which can be a non-invasive therapeutic procedure in cancer therapy using low-intensity light in the range of 450-800 nm. One of the main functional features of laser therapy is the photobiostimulation effects of low-level lasers on various biological systems including altering DNA synthesis and modifying gene expression, and stopping cellular proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLT on mice mammary tumor and the expression of Let-7a, miR155, miR21, miR125, and miR376b in the plasma and tumor samples. Sixteen mice were equally divided into four groups including control, and blue, green, and red lasers at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 632 nm, respectively. Weber Medical Applied Laser irradiation was carried out with a low power of 1-3 mW and a series of 10 treatments at three times a week after tumor establishment. Tumor volume was weekly measured by a digital vernier caliper, and qRT-PCR assays were performed to accomplish the study. Depending on the number of groups and the p value of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of normality, a t test, a one-way ANOVA, or a non-parametric test was used for data analyses, and p?<?0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The average tumor volume was significantly less in the treated blue group than the control group on at days 21, 28, and 35 after cancerous cell injection. Our data also showed an increase of Let-7a and miR125a expression and a decrease of miR155, miR21, and miR376b expression after LLLT with the blue laser both the plasma and tumor samples compared to other groups. It seems that the non-invasive nature of laser bio-stimulation can make LLLT an attractive alternative therapeutic tool.

Lasers Med Sci. 2016 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]

The use of low-level light therapy in supportive care for patients with breast cancer: review of the literature.

Robijns J1,2, Censabella S3, Bulens P4,3, Maes A4,3, Mebis J5,4,3.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Medicine & Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Martelarenlaan 42, 3500, Hasselt, Belgium. jolien.robijns@uhasselt.be.
  • 2Limburg Oncology Center, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium. jolien.robijns@uhasselt.be.
  • 3Division of Medical Oncology, Jessa Hospital, Campus Virga Jesse, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium.
  • 4Limburg Oncology Center, Stadsomvaart 11, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium.
  • 5Faculty of Medicine & Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Martelarenlaan 42, 3500, Hasselt, Belgium.

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, with an incidence of 1.7 million in 2012. Breast cancer and its treatments can bring along serious side effects such as fatigue, skin toxicity, lymphedema, pain, nausea, etc. These can substantially affect the patients’ quality of life. Therefore, supportive care for breast cancer patients is an essential mainstay in the treatment. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) also named photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has proven its efficiency in general medicine for already more than 40 years. It is a noninvasive treatment option used to stimulate wound healing and reduce inflammation, edema, and pain. LLLT is used in different medical settings ranging from dermatology, physiotherapy, and neurology to dentistry. Since the last twenty years, LLLT is becoming a new treatment modality in supportive care for breast cancer. For this review, all existing literature concerning the use of LLLT for breast cancer was used to provide evidence in the following domains: oral mucositis (OM), radiodermatitis (RD), lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The findings of this review suggest that LLLT is a promising option for the management of breast cancer treatment-related side effects. However, it still remains important to define appropriate treatment and irradiation parameters for each condition in order to ensure the effectiveness of LLLT.

Antioxid Redox Signal. 2015 Sep 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Phototherapy-induced antitumor immunity: long-term tumor supression effects via photoinactivation of respiratory chain oxidase-triggered superoxide anion burst.

Lu C1,2, Zhou F3, Wu S4,5,6, Liu L7, Xing D8.
Author information
1Guangzhou, China.
2MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; lucx@scnu.edu.cn.
3MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; zhouff@scnu.edu.cn.
4South China Normal UniversityGuang Zhou, China , 510631.
5China.
6MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; wushn@scnu.edu.cn.
7MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science & Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan Avenue West, Tianhe District,Guangzhou , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; liulei@scnu.edu.cn.
8South China Normal University , No. 55 Zhongshan west road, Tianhe district , guangzhou, China , 510631 ; xingda@scnu.edu.cn.

Abstract
AIMS:
Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) results in oxidative damage that induces tumor cell apoptosis. In this study, we focused on the immunological effects of HF-LPLI phototherapy and explored its antitumor immune regulatory mechanism.
RESULTS:
We found not only that HF-LPLI treatment induced tumor cell apoptosis but also that HF-LPLI-treated apoptotic tumor cells activated macrophages. Due to mitochondrial superoxide anion burst after HF-LPLI treatment, tumor cells displayed a high level of phosphatidylserine oxidation, which mediated the recognition and uptake by macrophages with the subsequent secretion of cytokines and generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In addition, in vivo results showed that HF-LPLI treatment caused leukocyte infiltration into the tumor and efficaciously inhibited tumor growth in an EMT6 tumor model. These phenomena were absent in the respiration-deficient EMT6 tumor model, implying that the HF-LPLI-elicited immunological effects were dependent on the mitochondrial superoxide anion burst.
INNOVATION:
Here, for the first time, we show that HF-LPLI mediates tumor-killing effects via targeting photoinactivation respiratory chain oxidase to trigger a superoxide anion burst, leading to a high level of oxidatively modified moieties, which contributes to the phenotypic changes in macrophages and mediates the antitumor immune response.
CONCLUSION:
Our results suggest that HF-LPLI may be an effective cancer treatment modality that both eradicates the treated primary tumors and induces an antitumor immune response via photoinactivation of respiratory chain oxidase to trigger superoxide anion burst.
Discov Med. 2015 Apr;19(105):293-301.

Advances in strategies and methodologies in cancer immunotherapy.

Lam SS1, Zhou F2, Hode T1, Nordquist RE1, Alleruzzo L1, Raker J1, Chen WR3.

Author information

  • 1Immunophotonics Inc., 4320 Forest Park Ave. #303, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
  • 2Biophotonics Research Laboratory, Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034, USA.
  • 3Biophotonics Research Laboratory, Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034, USA and Immunophotonics Inc., 4320 Forest Park Ave. #303, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.

Abstract

Since the invention of Coley’s toxin by William Coley in early 1900s, the path for cancer immunotherapy has been a convoluted one. Although still not considered standard of care, with the FDA approval of trastuzumab, Provenge and ipilimumab, the medical and scientific community has started to embrace the possibility that immunotherapy could be a new hope for cancer patients with otherwise untreatable metastatic diseases. This review aims to summarize the development of some major strategies in cancer immunotherapy, from the earliest peptide vaccine and transfer of tumor specific antibodies/T cells to the more recent dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, whole cell tumor vaccines, and checkpoint blockade therapy. Discussion of some major milestones and obstacles in the shaping of the field and the future perspectives is included. Photoimmunotherapy is also reviewed as an example of emerging new therapies combining phototherapy and immunotherapy.

 J Biomed Opt.  2012 Oct;17(10):101516. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.10.101516.

Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

Magrini TD, dos Santos NV, Milazzotto MP, Cerchiaro G, da Silva Martinho H.

Source

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia 166, Bangu, Santo André, SP 09210-170, Brazil.

Abstract

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000 mJ/cm². The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5 mJ/cm², MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1 J/cm² laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8 mJ/cm², the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

Photomed Laser Surg.  2012 Sep;30(9):551-8. doi: 10.1089/pho.2011.3186. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

A preliminary study of the safety of red light phototherapy of tissues harboring cancer.

Myakishev-Rempel M, Stadler I, Brondon P, Axe DR, Friedman M, Nardia FB, Lanzafame R.

Source

Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA. max.rempel@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present.

BACKGROUND DATA:

LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation or promotion of metastatic lesions or new primary tumors. There has been little scientific study of oncologic outcomes after use of LLLT in cancer patients.

METHODS:

A standard SKH mouse nonmelanoma UV-induced skin cancer model was used after visible squamous cell carcinomas were present, to study the effects of LLLT on tumor growth. The red light group (n=8) received automated full body 670 nm LLLT delivered twice a day at 5 J/cm(2) using an LED source. The control group (n=8) was handled similarly, but did not receive LLLT. Measurements on 330 tumors were conducted for 37 consecutive days, while the animals received daily LLLT.

RESULTS:

Daily tumor measurements demonstrated no measurable effect of LLLT on tumor growth.

CONCLUSIONS:

This experiment suggests that LLLT at these parameters may be safe even when malignant lesions are present. Further studies on the effects of photoirradiation on neoplasms are warranted.

J Biomed Opt. 2012 Oct 25;17(10):101516-1. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.10.101516.

Low-level laser therapy on MCF-7 cells: a micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

Magrini TD, Dos Santos NV, Milazzotto MP, Cerchiaro G, da Silva Martinho H.

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably scale from photobiostimulation/photobioinhibition at the cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. This study quantifies some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. Malignant breast cells (MCF-7) were exposed to spatially filtered light from a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with fluences of 5, 28.8, and 1000 mJ/cm2. The cell viability was evaluated by optical microscopy using the Trypan Blue viability test. The micro-Fourier transform infrared technique was employed to obtain the vibrational spectra of each experimental group (control and irradiated) and identify the relevant biochemical alterations that occurred due to the process. It was observed that the red light influenced the RNA, phosphate, and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. We found that light can influence cell metabolism depending on the laser fluence. For 5 mJ/cm2, MCF-7 cells suffer bioinhibition with decreased metabolic rates. In contrast, for the 1 J/cm2 laser fluence, cells present biostimulation accompanied by a metabolic rate elevation. Surprisingly, at the intermediate fluence, 28.8 mJ/cm2, the metabolic rate is increased despite the absence of proliferative results. The data were interpreted within the retrograde signaling pathway mechanism activated with light irradiation.

Photomed Laser Surg.  2012 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print]

A Preliminary Study of the Safety of Red Light Phototherapy of Tissues Harboring Cancer.

Myakishev-Rempel M, Stadler I, Brondon P, Axe DR, Friedman M, Nardia FB, Lanzafame R.

Source

1 Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester , Rochester, New York.

Abstract

Abstract Objective: Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present.

Background data: LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation or promotion of metastatic lesions or new primary tumors. There has been little scientific study of oncologic outcomes after use of LLLT in cancer patients.

Methods: A standard SKH mouse nonmelanoma UV-induced skin cancer model was used after visible squamous cell carcinomas were present, to study the effects of LLLT on tumor growth. The red light group (n=8) received automated full body 670 nm LLLT delivered twice a day at 5 J/cm(2) using an LED source. The control group (n=8) was handled similarly, but did not receive LLLT.

Measurements on 330 tumors were conducted for 37 consecutive days, while the animals received daily LLLT. Results: Daily tumor measurements demonstrated no measurable effect of LLLT on tumor growth.

Conclusions: This experiment suggests that LLLT at these parameters may be safe even when malignant lesions are present. Further studies on the effects of photoirradiation on neoplasms are warranted.

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult.  2012 Jul-Aug;(4):23-32.

The efficacy of polychromatic visible and infrared radiation used for the postoperative immunological rehabilitation of patients with breast cancer.

[Article in Russian]
[No authors listed]

Abstract

The immunological rehabilitation of the patients with oncological problems after the completion of standard anti-tumour therapy remains a topical problem in modern medicine. The up-to-date phototherapeutic methods find the increasingly wider application for the treatment of such patients including the use of monochromatic visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers and photodiodes. The objective of the present study was to substantiate the expediency of postoperative immune rehabilitation of the patients with breast cancer (BC) by means of irradiation of the body surface with polychromatic visible (pVIS) in combination with polychromatic infrared (pIR) light similar to the natural solar radiation without its minor UV component. The study included 19 patients with stage I–II BC at the mean age of 54.0 +/- 4.28 years having the infiltrative-ductal form of the tumour who had undergone mastectomy. These patients were randomly allocated to two groups, one given the standard course of postoperative rehabilitation (control), the other (study group) additionally treated with pVIS + pIR radiation applied to the lumbar-sacral region from days 1 to 7 after surgery. A Bioptron-2 phototherapeutic device, Switzerland, was used for the purpose (480-3400 nm, 40 mW/cm2, 12 J/cm2, with the light spot diameter of 15 cm). The modern standard immunological methods were employed. It was found that mastectomy induced changes of many characteristics of cellular and humoral immunity; many of them in different patients were oppositely directed. These changes were apparent within the first 7 days postoperatively. The course of phototherapy (PT) was shown to prevent the postoperative decrease in the counts of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, the total amount of CD3+ -T-lymphocytes (LPC), CD4+ -T-helpers, activated T-lymphocytes (CD3+ HLA-DR+ cells) and IgA levels as well as intracellular digestion rate of neutrophil-phagocyted bacteria. Moreover PT promoted faster normalization of postoperative leukocytosis and activation of cytotoxic CD8+ -T-LPC, reduced the elevated concentration of immune complexes in blood. Among the six tested cytokines, viz. IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-alpha, and IFN-gamma, only the latter two underwent significant elevation of their blood concentrations (IL-6 within 1 day) and IFN-gamma (within 7 days after mastectomy). The course of PT resulted in the decrease of their levels to the initial values. The follow-up of the treated patients during 4 years revealed neither recurrence of the disease nor the appearance of metastases.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2010 Feb;28(1):115-23.

The effect of laser irradiation on proliferation of human breast carcinoma, melanoma, and immortalized mammary epithelial cells.

Powell K, Low P, McDonnell PA, Laakso EL, Ralph SJ.

School of Medical Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study compared the effects of different doses (J/cm(2)) of laser phototherapy at wavelengths of either 780, 830, or 904 nm on human breast carcinoma, melanoma, and immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines in vitro. In addition, we examined whether laser irradiation would malignantly transform the murine fibroblast NIH3T3 cell line.

BACKGROUND: Laser phototherapy is used in the clinical treatment of breast cancer-related lymphoedema, despite limited safety information. This study contributes to systematically developing guidelines for the safe use of laser in breast cancer-related lymphoedema. METHODS: Human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), human breast ductal carcinoma with melanomic genotypic traits (MDA-MB-435S), and immortalized human mammary epithelial (SVCT and Bre80hTERT) cell lines were irradiated with a single exposure of laser. MCF-7 cells were further irradiated with two and three exposures of each laser wavelength. Cell proliferation was assessed 24 h after irradiation.

RESULTS: Although certain doses of laser increased MCF-7 cell proliferation, multiple exposures had either no effect or showed negative dose response relationships. No sign of malignant transformation of cells by laser phototherapy was detected under the conditions applied here.

CONCLUSION: Before a definitive conclusion can be made regarding the safety of laser for breast cancer-related lymphoedema, further in vivo research is required.

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):49-52.

Application of low-power visible and near infrared radiation in clinical oncology.

[Article in Russian]

Zimin AA, Zhevago NA, Buniakova AI, Samoilova KA.

Although low-power visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers, photodiodes, and other sources does not cause neoplastic transformation of the tissue, these phototherapeutic techniques are looked at with a great deal of caution for fear of their stimulatory effect on tumour growth. This apprehension arises in the first place from the reports on the possibility that the proliferative activity of tumour cells may increase after their in vitro exposure to light. Much less is known that these phototherapeutic modalities have been successfully used for the prevention and management of complications developing after surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy. The objective of the present review is to summarize the results of applications of low-power visible and near infrared radiation for the treatment of patients with oncological diseases during the last 20-25 years. It should be emphasized that 2-4 year-long follow-up observations have not revealed any increase in the frequency of tumour recurrence and metastasis.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2009 Oct;27(5):763-9.

Managing postmastectomy lymphedema with low-level laser therapy.

Lau RW, Cheing GL.

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in managing postmastectomy lymphedema. BACKGROUND DATA: Postmastectomy lymphedema (PML) is a common complication of breast cancer treatment that causes various symptoms, functional impairment, or even psychosocial morbidity. A prospective, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effectiveness of LLLT on managing PML.

METHODS: Twenty-one women suffering from unilateral PML were randomly allocated to receive either 12 sessions of LLLT in 4 wk (the laser group) or no laser irradiation (the control group). Volumetry and tonometry were used to monitor arm volume and tissue resistance; the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was used for measuring subjective symptoms. Outcome measures were assessed before and after the treatment period and at the 4 wk follow-up.

RESULTS: Reduction in arm volume and increase in tissue softening was found in the laser group only. At the follow-up session, significant between-group differences (all p < 0.05) were found in arm volume and tissue resistance at the anterior torso and forearm region. The laser group had a 16% reduction in the arm volume at the end of the treatment period, that dropped to 28% in the follow-up. Moreover, the laser group demonstrated a cumulative increase from 15% to 33% in the tonometry readings over the forearm and anterior torso. The DASH score of the laser group showed progressive improvement over time.

CONCLUSION: LLLT was effective in the management of PML, and the effects were maintained to the 4 wk follow-up.

Clin Rehabil. 2009 Feb;23(2):117-24

Efficacy of pneumatic compression and low-level laser therapy in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphoedema: a randomized controlled trial.

Kozanoglu E, Basaran S, Paydas S, Sarpel T.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey.

Objective: To compare the long-term efficacy of pneumatic compression and low-level laser therapies in the management of postmastectomy lymphoedema.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.Setting: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of Cukurova University, Turkey.

Subjects: Forty-seven patients with postmastectomy lymphoedema were enrolled in the study.Interventions: Patients were randomly allocated to pneumatic compression (group I, n=24) and low-level laser (group II, n=23) groups. Group I received 2 hours of compression therapy and group II received 20 minutes of laser therapy for four weeks. All patients were advised to perform daily limb exercises.Main measures: Demographic features, difference between sum of the circumferences of affected and unaffected limbs (triangle upC), pain with visual analogue scale and grip strength were recorded.

Results: Mean age of the patients was 48.3 (10.4) years. triangle upC decreased significantly at one, three and six months within both groups, and the decrease was still significant at month 12 only in group II (P = 0.004). Improvement of group II was greater than that of group I post treatment (P = 0.04) and at month 12 after 12 months (P = 0.02). Pain was significantly reduced in group I only at posttreatment evaluation, whereas in group II it was significant post treatment and at follow-up visits. No significant difference was detected in pain scores between the two groups. Grip strength was improved in both groups, but the differences between groups were not significant.

Conclusions: Patients in both groups improved after the interventions. Group II had better long-term results than group I. Low-level laser might be a useful modality in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphoedema.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2008 Aug;26(4):393-400.

Low-level laser therapy in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in young patients.

Abramoff MM, Lopes NN, Lopes LA, Dib LL, Guilherme A, Caran EM, Barreto AD, Lee ML, Petrilli AS.

Private practice, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract Objective: A pilot clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy (CT)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in young patients. Background Data: Besides compromising the patient’s nutrition and well-being, oral mucositis represents a portal of entry into the body for microorganisms present in the mouth, which may lead to sepsis if there is hematological involvement. Oncologic treatment tolerance decreases and systemic complications may arise that interfere with the success of cancer treatment. LLLT appears to be an interesting alternative to other approaches to treating OM, due to its trophic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing chemotherapy (22 cycles) without mucositis were randomized into a group receiving prophylactic laser-irradiation (group 1), and a group receiving placebo light treatment (group 2). Patients who had already presented with mucositis were placed in a group receiving irradiation for therapeutic purposes (group 3, with 10 cycles of CT). Serum granulocyte levels were taken and compared to the progression of mucositis. Results: In group 1, most patients (73%) presented with mucositis of grade 0 (p = 0.03 when compared with the placebo group), and 18% presented with grade 1. In group 2, 27% had no OM and did not require therapy. In group 3, the patients had marked pain relief (as assessed by a visual analogue scale), and a decrease in the severity of OM, even when they had severe granulocytopenia. Conclusion: The ease of use of LLLT, high patient acceptance, and the positive results achieved, make this therapy feasible for the prevention and treatment of OM in young patients.

Ann Oncol. 2007 Apr;18(4):639-46. Epub 2006 Oct 3

A systematic review of common conservative therapies for arm lymphoedema secondary to breast cancer treatment.

Moseley AL, Carati CJ, Piller NB.

School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. amanda.moseley@yahoo.com.au

Secondary arm lymphoedema is a chronic and distressing condition which affects a significant number of women who undergo breast cancer treatment. A number of health professional and patient instigated conservative therapies have been developed to help with this condition, but their comparative benefits are not clearly known. This systematic review undertook a broad investigation of commonly instigated conservative therapies for secondary arm lymphoedema including; complex physical therapy, manual lymphatic drainage, pneumatic pumps, oral pharmaceuticals, low level laser therapy, compression bandaging and garments, limb exercises and limb elevation. It was found that the more intensive and health professional based therapies, such as complex physical therapy, manual lymphatic drainage, pneumatic pump and laser therapy generally yielded the greater volume reductions, whilst self instigated therapies such as compression garment wear, exercises and limb elevation yielded smaller reductions. All conservative therapies produced improvements in subjective arm symptoms and quality of life issues, where these were measured. Despite the identified benefits, there is still the need for large scale, high level clinical trials in this area.

Lasers Med Sci. 2006 Jul;21(2):90-4. Epub 2006 May 4.

Low-level laser therapy in management of postmastectomy lymphedema.

Kaviani A, Fateh M, Yousefi Nooraie R, Alinagi-zadeh MR, Ataie-Fashtami L.

Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Iranian Center for Medical Laser Research, Tehran, Iran. akaviani@sina.tims.ac.ir

The aim of this paper was to study the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphedema. Eleven women with unilateral postmastectomy lymphedema were enrolled in a double-blind controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to laser and sham groups and received laser or placebo irradiation (Ga-As laser device with a wavelength of 890 nm and fluence of 1.5 J/cm2) over the arm and axillary areas. Changes in patients’ limb circumference, pain score, range of motion, heaviness of the affected limb, and desire to continue the treatment were measured before the treatment and at follow-up sessions (weeks 3, 9, 12, 18, and 22) and were compared to pretreatment values. Results showed that of the 11 enrolled patients, eight completed the treatment sessions. Reduction in limb circumference was detected in both groups, although it was more pronounced in the laser group up to the end of 22nd week. Desire to continue treatment at each session and baseline score in the laser group was greater than in the sham group in all sessions. Pain reduction in the laser group was more than in the sham group except for the weeks 3 and 9. No substantial differences were seen in other two parameters between the two treatment groups. In conclusion, despite our encouraging results, further studies of the effects of LLLT in management of postmastectomy lymphedema should be undertaken to determine the optimal physiological and physical parameters to obtain the most effective clinical response.

J Photochem Photobiol B. 2000 Dec;59(1-3):1-8.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) controlled outcome of side effects caused by ionizing radiation, treated with 780 nm-diode laser –preliminary results.

Schaffer M, Bonel H, Sroka R, Schaffer PM, Busch M, Sittek H, Reiser M, Duhmke E.
Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Munich, Germany.

sroka@life.med.uni-muenchen.de

BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVE: Ionizing radiation therapy by way of various beams such as electron, photon and neutron is an established method in tumor treatment. The side effects caused by this treatment such as ulcer, painful mastitis and delay of wound healing are well known, too. Biomodulation by low level laser therapy (LLLT) has become popular as a therapeutic modality for the acceleration of wound healing and the treatment of inflammation. Evidence for this kind of application, however, is not fully understood yet. This study intends to demonstrate the response of biomodulative laser treatment on the side effects caused by ionizing radiation by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). STUDY

DESIGN/PATIENTS and METHODS: Six female patients suffering from painful mastitis after breast ionizing irradiation and one man suffering from radiogenic ulcer were treated with lambda=780 nm diode laser irradiation at a fluence rate of 5 J/cm2. LLLT was performed for a period of 4-6 weeks (mean sessions: 25 per patient, range 19-35). The tissue response was determined by means of MRI after laser treatment in comparison to MRI prior to the beginning of the LLLT.

RESULTS: All patients showed complete clinical remission. The time-dependent contrast enhancement curve obtained by the evaluation of MR images demonstrated a significant decrease of enhancement features typical for inflammation in the affected area.

CONCLUSION: Biomodulation by LLLT seems to be a promising treatment modality for side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

Inspire and Deepen Your Practice!

Laser, laser needle acupuncture, led and pulsed electromagnetic field therapies are the right tools for healing today’s complex patients and for your practice success.

10-6-15 3 rows of 4 productsl

All devices pictured above (and more) will likely be available for you to train and practice with in this course.  Learn more about them in the links below.

Healing Light Seminars and David Rindge have been practicing, teaching and continually updating our treatment methods and equipment since 2002. Our goal first and foremost is to provide you with an understanding of the parameters and methods for success so that you come from the knowledge to make the best relevant clinical and business decisions for your practice.  We will only offer devices we have found to be effective, well made and which we are continuing to use clinically.  Yet whether or not you buy from us, you should learn what device parameters will achieve the best results for your purposes.

Day 1 focuses on theory, biological effects and essentials for clinical success.   You have the opportunity for hands-on practice with state-of-the-art laser, laser needle, led and pemf systems for the treatment of pain, head to toe.

In Day 2, you will learn how to apply laser, laser needles, led and pulsed electromagnetic field therapies for aesthetics / dermatology / facial rejuvenation, cardiovascular disease, digestive, ear and eye disorders, gynecology, for hair regrowth, neuropathy, osteoporosis, respiratory disorders, sports medicine and more.

You will receive Laser Therapy: A Clinical Manual as part of the course.

Laser Therapy - A Clinical Manual This popular training manual by Blahnik and Rindge presents the theory and clinical application of laser therapy in clearly understandable terms with treatment protocols for more than 40 conditions.  Laser Therapy: A Clinical Manual is an important important resource in the course and a $79.00 value.  You will also receive treatment protocols for other conditions, updates and much, much more relevant material in this course.

Gain a solid understanding of energy-based therapies.    NCCAOM 322-5, seven hours each day, Saturday and Sunday.    Learn More.

Course Dates / Location

November 5-6, 2016.  SpringHill Suites Orlando Airport.  5828 Hazeltine National DriveOrlando, FL 32822. (407) 816-5533.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER HERE

Or call 321-751-7001.

Healing Light Seminars

Training in Energy-based Therapies since 2002

14 PDAs – NCCAOM 322-5

14 CEUs Florida Acupuncturists

New Software

If you are already own a 2000PC system, by upgrading the software you gain the option to add the new, Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe.

Software on laptop plus controller

The new software increases the maximum intensity of the PEMF which can be generated by your 2000 PC system by 50%, from 100 milliTeslas to 150 milliTeslas, and allows  simultaneous therapy with 2 Watts of  640 nanometer led light with your Combo Probe.

The new software  is easy to install and user-friendly.  It operates presets for almost 100 conditions and allows you to create custom protocols with intensity, pulse rate (1-50 Hz) and treatment times fully programmable.

  • All treatment parameters are under direct control of the PC program running under Windows 7, 8.1 & 10 or Mac OS X Yosemite 10.10 & EI Capitan
  • User-friendly database for patient data and follow up.
  • Preset treatment protocols ready-to-use for almost 100 conditions.
  • Therapy parameters can be set manually, saved in the Custom Disorders database and then run automatically.
  • Full PEMF report printing, including treatment history data, treatment time and accumulated treatment time.
  • Automatic USB communication port detection for very easy installation without basic computer knowledge.

You will save 50% on the price of the new software ($337.50 vs $675) when you purchase it bundled with the Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe and a second cable.

Software Screenshot 1

Software Screenshot 2

Software Screenshot 3

Software Screenshot 4

Inspire and deepen your practice!

Laser, laser needle acupuncture, led and pulsed electromagnetic field therapies are the right tools for healing today’s complex patients and for your practice success!

10-6-15 3 rows of 4 productsl

All devices pictured above (and more) will likely be available for you to train and practice with in this course.  Learn more about them in the links below.

Our primary goal in this course is to provide you with an understanding of laser, led and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy parameters and methods for your success, so that you come from the knowledge and are able to make the best clinical and business decisions for your practice.  That said, to our knowledge these are the best available laser, PEMF and led devices in the US.  It is our policy only to offer equipment which we have found effective, well made and which we ourselves are continuing to use extensively in the clinic.  These products may be available to seminar attendees at a discount otherwise unobtainable and one which will easily pay for the course and more.

Healing Light Seminars and David Rindge have been practicing, teaching and continually updating our treatment methods and equipment since 2002.   That you gain the theoretical and clinical foundation so that you can confidently make the correct decisions for your practice and achieve best outcomes for your patients remains our #1 goal.

Day 1 focuses on theory, biological effects and essentials for treatment success.   You have the opportunity for hands-on practice with state-of-the-art laser, laser needle, led and pemf systems for the treatment of pain, head to toe.

In Day 2, you will learn how to apply laser, laser needle, led and pulsed electromagnetic field therapies for aesthetics / dermatology / facial rejuvenation, cardiovascular disease, digestive, ear and eye disorders, gynecology, for hair regrowth, neuropathy, osteoporosis, respiratory disorders, sports medicine and much more.

You will receive Laser Therapy: A Clinical Manual as part of the course.

Laser Therapy - A Clinical Manual This popular training manual by Blahnik and Rindge presents the theory and clinical application of laser therapy in clearly understandable terms with treatment protocols for more than 40 conditions.  Laser Therapy: A Clinical Manual is an important important resource in the course and a $79.00 value.  You will also receive treatment protocols for other conditions, updates and much, much more relevant material in this course.

Gain a solid understanding of energy-based therapies.    NCCAOM 322-5, seven hours each day, Saturday and Sunday.    Learn More.

Course Dates / Location

November 5-6, 2016.  SpringHill Suites Orlando Airport.  5828 Hazeltine National DriveOrlando, FL 32822. (407) 816-5533.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER HERE

Or call 321-751-7001.

Healing Light Seminars

Training in Energy-based Therapies since 2002

14 PDAs – NCCAOM 322-5

14 CEUs Florida Acupuncturists

Osteosarcoma

J Orthop Surg Res. 2015; 10: 104.
Published online 2015 Jul 7. doi:  10.1186/s13018-015-0247-z
PMCID: PMC4496869

Nanosecond pulsed electric field inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human osteosarcoma

Xudong Miao,# Shengyong Yin,# Zhou Shao, Yi Zhang, and Xinhua Chencorresponding author
The Department of Orthopedics, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310003 China
The Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis Treatment of Infectious Diseases, 79 Qinchun Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310003 China
The Department of Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310000 China
Xinhua Chen, Phone: +86-571-87236570, nc.ude.ujz@nehc_auhnix.
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
#Contributed equally.
Author information ? Article notes ? Copyright and License information ?
Received 2015 Jun 11; Accepted 2015 Jun 29.

Abstract

Objective

Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a novel minimal invasive and non-thermal ablation method that can induce apoptosis in different solid tumors. But the efficacy of nsPEF on bone-related tumors or bone metastasis is kept unknown. The current study investigates antitumor effect of nsPEF on osteosarcoma MG-63 cells in vitro.

Method

MG-63 cells were treated with nsPEF with different electric field strengths (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 kV/cm) and different pulse numbers (0, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 pulses). The inhibitory effect of nsPEF on the growth of MG-63 cells was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay at different time points (0, 3, 12, 24, and 48 h post nsPEF treatment). The apoptosis was analyzed by Hoechst stain, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and flow cytometric analysis. The expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), and tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) was examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot.

Results

The CCK-8 assay showed that nsPEF induced a distinct electric field strength- and pulse number-dependent reduction of cell proliferation. For treatment parameter optimizing, the condition 40 kV/cm and 30 pulses at 24 h post nsPEF achieved the most significant apoptotic induction rate. Hoechst, TUNEL, and flow cytometric analysis showed that the cell apoptosis was induced and cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase. PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that nsPEF up-regulated OPG expression had no effect on RANKL, increased OPG/RANKL ratio.

Conclusion

NsPEF inhibits osteosarcoma growth, induces apoptosis, and affects bone metabolism by up-regulating OPG, indicating nsPEF-induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. NsPEF has potential to treat osteosarcoma or bone metastasis. When nsPEF is applied on metastatic bone tumors, it might be beneficial by inducing osteoblastic differentiation without cancer proliferation. In the future, nsPEF might be one of the treatments of metastatic bone tumor.

Keywords: Osteosarcoma, MG-63 cells, Nanosecond pulsed electric field, Apoptosis

Introduction

Osteosarcoma is a malignant bone tumor with high occurrence in children and young adolescents. Retrospective review showed that in the past 30 years, osteosarcoma had a poor prognosis and there was no significant improvement of disease-free survival and the stagnated situation has not improved even with the aggressive use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy [1]. Patients did not benefit from overtreatment, and as a result, a high rate of lung metastasis, recurrence, and pathological fracture frequently occur, keeping osteosarcoma still one of the lowest survival rates in pediatric cancers [2]. Thus, new therapeutic strategy needs to be developed.

Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is an innovative electric ablation method based on high-voltage power technology, which came into medical application in the last decade [3]. NsPEF accumulates the electric field energy slowly and releases it into the tumor in ultra-short nanosecond pulses, altering electrical conductivity and permeability of the cell membrane, causing both cell apoptosis and immune reaction [4].Quite different from any other traditional local ablation method, nsPEF accumulate less Joule heating and showed no hyperthermic effects [5], indicating unique advantage over other thermal therapies such as radiofrequency, cryoablation, microwave, and interstitial laser; nsPEF can be used alone and so avoid the side effect caused by chemotherapy or percutaneous ethanol injection [6].

We have used nsPEF to ablate tumor and showed the equal outcome as the radical resection with proper indication [7]. Clinical trials and pre-clinical studies from different groups proved that nsPEF has direct antitumor effects by inhibiting proliferation and causing apoptosis in human basal cell carcinoma [8, 9], cutaneous papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma [10], melanoma [11, 12], hepatocellular tumor [13], pancreatic tumor [14], colon tumor [15, 16], breast cancer [17, 18], salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma [19], oral squamous cell carcinoma [20], et al. Local ablation with nsPEF indicates the noticeable advantage of not only eliminating original tumors but also inducing an immune reaction, e.g., enhance macrophage [21] and T cell infiltration [22] and induce an immune-protective effect against recurrences of the same cancer [23]. The characteristic of electric field on bone metabolism [24] is extremely helpful for osteosarcoma patients with pathological fracture which leads to poor prognosis [25, 26].

Considering osteosarcoma is especially prevalent in children and young adults during quick osteoblastic differentiation [1, 2], unstable RB gene and p53 gene are commonly involved in this malignant transformation process [27]; we hypothesize that nsPEF affects osteosarcoma growth by targeting the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway, a key signaling cascade involved in osteosarcoma pathogenesis. Here, we investigate nsPEF-induced changes on human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells to determine (1) the dose-effect relationship and time-effect relationship of nsPEF on osteosarcoma cell growth and apoptosis induction and (2) the nsPEF effect on the osteosarcoma cell; osteoblast specific gene and protein expression (receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG)) were measured along with the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a).

Materials and methods

Cell lines and cell culture

MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were purchased from the Cell Bank of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Shanghai, China), cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM, Gibco Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS, SAFC Biosciences, Lenexa, KS, USA), 100 units/mL penicillin, and 100 mg/mL streptomycin (Sigma, Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA). Cells were kept in a humidified atmosphere of 5 % CO2 at 37 °C.

The nsPEF treatment and dose-effect exam

The nsPEF treatment system was made by Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Germany, and an nsPEF generator with duration of 100 ns was applied. Varied electric fields were released in a cell treatment system from 10 to 60 kV/cm. Waveforms were monitored with a digital phosphor oscilloscope (DPO4054, Tektronix, USA) equipped with a high voltage probe (P6015A, Tektronix, USA). MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were harvested with trypsin and resuspended in fresh DMEM with 10 % FBS to a concentration of 5.0 × 106 cells/mL. Five hundred microliters of cell suspension were placed into a sterile electroporation cuvette (Bio-Rad, US, 0.1-cm gap). Cells were exposed to 100 pulses at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 kV/cm electric field strengths, respectively. Under the 50 kV/cm electric field strength, the different pulse numbers were applied (0, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 pulses). The experiments were repeated for three times. After incubation for 24 h, cells were calculated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay (Dojindo Laboratories, Kumamoto, Japan).

Measurement of apoptosis with TUNEL assay, Hoechst stain, and flow cytometry

At different hours after nsPEF treatment (40 kV/cm, 30 pulses), the treated cells were incubated for 0, 3, 12, 24, and 48 h to determine single-cell apoptosis using the assay of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) with In Situ Cell Death Detection Kit (Millipore, USA) and Hoechst stain kit (Beyotime, Shanghai, China) according to the manufacturer’s instruction, as previously described [14]. Under different electric field strengths and with different pulses, the treated cells were incubated for 24 h to detect cell apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit (BD Biosciences). The cell cycle was also analyzed as previously described [14].

Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction

Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed for assessing the expression of OPG, RANKL, and TNF-a. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a house keeping gene, was used as the internal control to calculate the comparative expression. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol reagent (Sangon, Shanghai, China). The first strand cDNA synthesis from 1 mg of RNA was performed using SuperScript II Reverse Transcriptase (Invitrogen) and Oligo dT primer (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. PCR was performed using the oligunucleotides listed as the following. The specific primers were made by Sangon, Shanghai, China, which were listed as the following: RANK: F: CAGGAGACCTAGCTACAGA, R: CAAGGTCAAGAGCATGGA, 95 °C, 1 min; 55 °C, 1 min; 72 °C, 1 min; OPG (264 bp): F: AGTGGGAGCAGAAGACAT, R: TGGA CCTGGTTACCTATC, 95 °C, 1 min; 57 °C, 1 min; 72 °C, 1 min; TNF-a: F: GTGGCAGTCTCAAACTGA, R: TATGGAAAGGGGCACTGA, 94 °C, 40 s; 55 °C, 40 s; 72 °C, 40 s; GAPDH: F: CAG CGACACCCACTCCTC, R: TGAGGTCCA CCACCCTGT, 94 °C, 1 min; 57 °C, 1 min; 72 °C, 1 min.

Western blotting analysis

MG-63 cells (5 × 105) were plated and treated with different doses of nsPEF. Cells were then lysed with a lysis buffer and then quantified. The equal amounts of protein were loaded, and electrophoresis was applied on a 12 % sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis mini-gel. Proteins were transferred to a PVDF membrane and blocked with casein PBS and 0.05 % Tween-20 for 1 h at room temperature. Membranes were incubated with mouse monoclonal OPG, anti-OPG (1:500), RANKL (1:200), TNF-a (1:300), GAPDH (1:1000) antibodies which were purchased from Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA, USA). Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody was purchased from Zhongshan (Zhongshan Golden Bridge, Beijing, China.). The protein expression was visualized with enhanced chemiluminescence reagent (ECL kit, Amersham, UK).

Statistical analysis

Statistical significance was determined using Student’s t test, using SPSS 13.0. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant result.

Results

NsPEF parameter optimizing by CCK-8 and flow cytometry

CCK-8 assay was used to calculate the IC50 values, and flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. There were significant growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in a dose-dependent manner following nsPEF treatment for 24 h. MG-63 cell growth was inhibited in an electric field strength- and pulse number-dependent manner. There was significant (P > 0.001) growth inhibition when electric field strength was 40–50 kV/cm (Fig. 1a) and when pulse number was 30 (Fig. 1d) vs control. Cells were treated by nsPEF and then incubated for 24 h. Apoptotic and dead cells were analyzed by flow cytometry using dual staining with propidium iodide (PI) and Annexin V-FITC. NsPEF induced viable apoptotic cells stained with Annexin. The apoptotic cell rate is significantly increased when electric field strength was 40–50 kV/cm (Fig. 1b, c) and when pulse number was 30 (Fig. 1e, f).

Fig. 1

NsPEF treatment parameter optimizing by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After 24 h post nsPEF, CCK-8 assay was used to calculate the IC50 values under different electric field strengths (a) and different pulse numbers (d). The flow cytometry was used to detect

Apoptosis induction at different times post nsPEF treatment

To determine the effects of nsPEF on the induction of apoptosis in MG-63 cells, the Annexin V assay was performed. After 40 kV/cm and 30 pulses of nsPEF treatment, the control and treated cells were stained with Hoechst 33528 (Fig. 2a upper lane) and TUNEL (Fig. 2a lower lane). The statistical analysis of the positive apoptotic cells were counted and shown in Fig. 2b at different hours (0, 3, 12, 24, and 48 h). Apoptotic cells induced by nsPEF treatment were recognized by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), detecting DNA fragmentation by labeling the terminal end of nucleic acids. The number or percentages of apoptotic cells detected following nsPEF treatment was shown in Fig. 2b. The quantitative analysis showed the percentages of apoptotic cells detected following nsPEF treatment which were 2.6 % (0 h), 8.8 % (3 h), 21 % (12 h), 42 % (24 h), and 15 % (48 h) without nsPEF treatment. The apoptotic induction 12 and 24 h post nsPEF treatment showed significance (P = 0.01243, 0.00081, respectively, vs control). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry (Fig. 2c) and statistically analyzed in Fig. 2d, which indicates that nsPEF arrest cells in the G0/G1 phase (Fig. 2d).

Fig. 2

Apoptosis induction at different times post nsPEF treatment. After 40 kV/cm and 30 pulses of nsPEF treatment, the control and treated cells were stained with Hoechst 33528 (a upper lane) and TUNEL (a lower lane). The statistical analysis of the positive

The effect of nsPEF on OPG/RANKL, TNF-? gene, and protein expression

With 30 pulses, 24 h post treatment, PCR and western blot were used to determine the different electric field strengths on cell OPG/RANKL, TNF-? gene (Fig. 3a), and the corresponding protein expression (Fig. 3b). NsPEF significantly increased OPG transcription and protein expression at 20–50 kV/cm (Fig. 3a, c). RANKL was almost undetectable both in the control and nsPEF-treated MG-63 cells (Fig. 3a, c). NsPEF slightly down-regulated TNF-a (Fig. 3a, c). The OPG is important in the regulation of bone formation. PCR results showed that the nsPEF-treated cells demonstrated a significantly up-regulation of OPG transcription. Western blot analysis confirmed that nsPEF stimulated osteoprotegerin protein production in the MG-63 cells.

Fig. 3

The nsPEF effect on gene and protein expression. With 30 pulses, 24 h post treatment, PCR and western blot were used to determine the different electric field strengths on cell OPG/RANKL, TNF-a gene (a), and protein expression (b). NsPEF significantly

Discussion

The primary bone malignancy osteosarcoma is still a challenge for orthopedics. For patients who are not suitable for radical resection, the minimal invasive ablation techniques can be used as an alternative to surgery. NsPEF has been proved to be a novel non-thermal ablation method which can activate a protection immune response [2123]. According to the Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), local ablation can be used for curative or palliative intent, either alone or in combination with immunotherapy or chemotherapy [11]. The effect of systemic chemotherapy may be enhanced by the physiological changes produced by ablation [11]. Furthermore, ablation can sometimes be used as a complement to surgery [13].

A number of studies have demonstrated that local ablation is effective in osteosarcoma [2830]. To our best knowledge, the application of nsPEF in osteosarcoma has never been reported. The bone-related tumor study is extremely important because many solid tumors tend to have metastasis in bones. The present study applies a new ablation methodology in osteosarcoma and identifies its molecular target. Our data suggest that nsPEF had direct effects on osteosarcoma cells, including the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. These results are consistent with previous reports. NsPEF inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells [11, 16].

The development of osteoclasts is controlled by cytokine synthesized by osteoblasts like receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-a) [31].The extension of the current study is the investigation of nsPEF’s effect on bone resorption when nsPEF is in its ablation dosage. OPG is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. It has multiple biological functions such as regulation of bone turnover. OPG can block the interaction between RANKL and the RANK receptor [31]. NsPEF increased OPG expression in MG-63 in in vitro assays. Our data indicate that nsPEF up-regulated the OPG expression. Bone remodeling can be assessed by the relative ratio of OPG to RANKL [32]. NsPEF had no effect on RANKL expression. Defined as a potent bone-resorbing factor, TNF-a is responsible for stimulating bone resorption. TNF-? exerts its osteoclastogenic effect by activating NF-?B with RANKL [33]. Our results show that in osteosarcoma MG-63, in addition to apoptosis induction, nsPEF can regulate bone metabolism through adjusting OPG/RANKL ratio.

TNF-a expression still needs further investigation due to the weak expression. But, it is the key cytokine that we assume which would change the local inflammatory microenvironment in the ablation zone.

The limit of the current study

In this in vitro study, the MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line is used as a model system. Therefore, results obtained from cultured cells only gave hints for the nsPEF treatment of osteosarcoma. The current results need to be tested in an in vivo osteosarcoma model, e.g., MG-63 cell xenografts.

Conclusion

NsPEF can be considered as a potential therapeutic intervention to suppress bone remodeling and osteoclast activity involved in osteosarcoma. Further in vivo studies are required to optimize the dosing regimen of nsPEF to fully study its antitumor potential in the bone microenvironment.

Acknowledgments

All authors acknowledge Dr.Karl H. Shoenbach, Dr. Stephen Beebe, and Mr. Frank Reidy from Old Dominion University for their kind support.

Financial support

This research is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81372425 and 81371658), National S & T Major Project (No. 2012ZX10002017), Zhejiang Natural Science Foundation (LY13H180003), and Xinjiang Cooperation Project (2014KL002).

Footnotes

Xudong Miao and Shengyong Yin contributed equally to this work.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

XM and SY carried out the molecular genetic studies and drafted the manuscript. ZS carried out the immunoassays. YZ participated in the design of the study and performed the statistical analysis. XC conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination, and helped draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

References

1. Kansara M, Teng MW, Smyth MJ, Thomas DM. Translational biology of osteosarcoma. Nat Rev Cancer.2014;14(11):722–35. doi: 10.1038/nrc3838. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
2. Stokke J, Sung L, Gupta A, Lindberg A, Rosenberg AR. Systematic review and meta-analysis of objective and subjective quality of life among pediatric, adolescent, and young adult bone tumor survivors. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2015 Mar 27. doi: 10.1002/pbc.25514. [Epub ahead of print] [PMC free article][PubMed]
3. Deng J, Schoenbach KH, Buescher ES, Hair PS, Fox PM, Beebe SJ. The effects of intense submicrosecond electrical pulses on cells. Biophys J. 2003;84(4):2709–14. doi: 10.1016/S0006-3495(03)75076-0. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
4. Chen X, Chen X, Schoenbach KH, Zheng S, Swanson RJ. Comparative study of long- and short-pulsed electric fields for treating melanoma in an in vivo mouse model. In Vivo. 2011;25(1):23–7. [PubMed]
5. Pliquett U, Nuccitelli R. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields. Bioelectrochemistry. 2014;100:62–8. doi: 10.1016/j.bioelechem.2014.03.001. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
6. Nuccitelli R, Tran K, Sheikh S, Athos B, Kreis M, Nuccitelli P. Optimized nanosecond pulsed electric field therapy can cause murine malignant melanomas to self-destruct with a single treatment. Int J Cancer.2010;127(7):1727–36. doi: 10.1002/ijc.25364. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
7. Yin S, Chen X, Hu C, Zhang X, Hu Z, Yu J, et al. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma: a novel locoregional ablation decreasing lung metastasis. Cancer Lett.2014;346(2):285–91. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2014.01.009. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
8. Nuccitelli R, Wood R, Kreis M, Athos B, Huynh J, Lui K, et al. First-in-human trial of nanoelectroablation therapy for basal cell carcinoma: proof of method. Exp Dermatol. 2014;23(2):135–7. doi: 10.1111/exd.12303. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
9. Garon EB, Sawcer D, Vernier PT, Tang T, Sun Y, Marcu L, et al. In vitro and in vivo evaluation and a case report of intense nanosecond pulsed electric field as a local therapy for human malignancies. Int J Cancer. 2007;121(3):675–82. doi: 10.1002/ijc.22723. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
10. Yin D, Yang WG, Weissberg J, Goff CB, Chen W, Kuwayama Y, et al. Cutaneous papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma therapy utilizing nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) PLoS One.2012;7(8):e43891. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043891. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
11. Chen X, Kolb JF, Swanson RJ, Schoenbach KH, Beebe SJ. Apoptosis initiation and angiogenesis inhibition: melanoma targets for nanosecond pulsed electric fields. Pigment Cell Melanoma Res.2010;23(4):554–63. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-148X.2010.00704.x. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
12. Guo F, Yao C, Li C, Mi Y, Peng Q, Tang J. In vivo evidences of nanosecond pulsed electric fields for melanoma malignancy treatment on tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Technol Cancer Res Treat.2014;13(4):337–44. [PubMed]
13. Chen X, Zhuang J, Kolb JF, Schoenbach KH, Beebe SJ. Long term survival of mice with hepatocellular carcinoma after pulse power ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields. Technol Cancer Res Treat.2012;11(1):83–93. [PubMed]
14. Ren Z, Chen X, Cui G, Yin S, Chen L, Jiang J, et al. Nanosecond pulsed electric field inhibits cancer growth followed by alteration in expressions of NF-?B and Wnt/?-catenin signaling molecules. PLoS One.2013;8(9):e74322. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074322. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
15. Hall EH, Schoenbach KH, Beebe SJ. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) induce direct electric field effects and biological effects on human colon carcinoma cells. DNA Cell Biol. 2005;24(5):283–91. doi: 10.1089/dna.2005.24.283. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
16. Hall EH, Schoenbach KH, Beebe SJ. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in p53-wildtype and p53-null HCT116 colon carcinoma cells. Apoptosis. 2007;12(9):1721–31. doi: 10.1007/s10495-007-0083-7. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
17. Wu S, Wang Y, Guo J, Chen Q, Zhang J, Fang J. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields as a novel drug free therapy for breast cancer: an in vivo study. Cancer Lett. 2014;343(2):268–74. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2013.09.032. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
18. Wu S, Guo J, Wei W, Zhang J, Fang J, Beebe SJ. Enhanced breast cancer therapy with nsPEFs and low concentrations of gemcitabine. Cancer Cell Int. 2014;14(1):98. doi: 10.1186/s12935-014-0098-4.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
19. Qi W, Guo J, Wu S, Su B, Zhang L, Pan J, et al. Synergistic effect of nanosecond pulsed electric field combined with low-dose of pingyangmycin on salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma. Oncol Rep.2014;31(5):2220–8. [PubMed]
20. Wang J, Guo J, Wu S, Feng H, Sun S, Pan J, et al. Synergistic effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields combined with low concentration of gemcitabine on human oral squamous cell carcinoma in vitro. PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e43213. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043213. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
21. Chen X, Yin S, Hu C, Chen X, Jiang K, Ye S, et al. Comparative study of nanosecond electric fields in vitro and in vivo on hepatocellular carcinoma indicate macrophage infiltration contribute to tumor ablation in vivo. PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e86421. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086421. [PMC free article] [PubMed][Cross Ref]
22. Nuccitelli R, Tran K, Lui K, Huynh J, Athos B, Kreis M, et al. Non-thermal nanoelectroablation of UV-induced murine melanomas stimulates an immune response. Pigment Cell Melanoma Res. 2012;25(5):618–29. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-148X.2012.01027.x. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
23. Chen R, Sain NM, Harlow KT, Chen YJ, Shires PK, Heller R, et al. A protective effect after clearance of orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma by nanosecond pulsed electric fields. Eur J Cancer.2014;50(15):2705–13. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2014.07.006. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
24. Greenebaum B. Induced electric field and current density patterns in bone fractures. Bioelectromagnetics.2012;33(7):585–93. doi: 10.1002/bem.21722. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
25. Salunke AA, Chen Y, Tan JH, Chen X, Khin LW, Puhaindran ME. Does a pathological fracture affect the prognosis in patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities?: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Bone Joint J. 2014;96-B(10):1396–403. doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.96B10.34370. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
26. Sun L, Li Y, Zhang J, Li H, Li B, Ye Z. Prognostic value of pathologic fracture in patients with high grade localized osteosarcoma: a systemic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. J Orthop Res.2015;33(1):131–9. doi: 10.1002/jor.22734. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
27. Rubio R, Gutierrez-Aranda I, Sáez-Castillo AI, Labarga A, Rosu-Myles M, Gonzalez-Garcia S, et al. The differentiation stage of p53-Rb-deficient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells imposes the phenotype of in vivo sarcoma development. Oncogene. 2013;32(41):4970–80. doi: 10.1038/onc.2012.507. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
28. Lerman DM, Randall RL. Local control of metastatic sarcoma. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015;27(1):3–8. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0000000000000170. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
29. Yu Z, Geng J, Zhang M, Zhou Y, Fan Q, Chen J. Treatment of osteosarcoma with microwave thermal ablation to induce immunogenic cell death. Oncotarget. 2014;5(15):6526–39. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
30. Saumet L, Deschamps F, Marec-Berard P, Gaspar N, Corradini N, Petit P, et al. Radiofrequency ablation of metastases from osteosarcoma in patients under 25 years: the SCFE experience. Pediatr Hematol Oncol.2015;32(1):41–9. doi: 10.3109/08880018.2014.926469. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
31. Aoyama E, Kubota S, Khattab HM, Nishida T, Takigawa M. CCN2 enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via direct binding to RANK and OPG. Bone. 2015;73:242–8. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.12.058. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
32. Tudpor K, van der Eerden BC, Jongwattanapisan P, Roelofs JJ, van Leeuwen JP, Bindels RJ, et al. Thrombin receptor deficiency leads to a high bone mass phenotype by decreasing the RANKL/OPG ratio.Bone. 2015;72:14–22. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.11.004. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
33. Walsh MC, Choi Y. Biology of the RANKL-RANK-OPG system in immunity, bone, and beyond. Front Immunol. 2014;5:511. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00511. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]

Chondrocytes

Logo of ijortho
Home Current issue Instructions Submit article
Indian J Orthop. 2016 Jan-Feb; 50(1): 87–93.
doi:  10.4103/0019-5413.173522
PMCID: PMC4759881

Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

Selvam Anbarasan, Ulaganathan Baraneedharan,1 Solomon FD Paul, Harpreet Kaur, Subramoniam Rangaswami,2 andEmmanuel Bhaskar3
Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3Department of General Medicine, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Address for correspondence: Mr. Selvam Anbarasan, Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. E-mail: moc.liamg@ivakbna
Author information ? Copyright and License information ?

Abstract

Background:

Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes.

Materials and Methods:

Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 ?T for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired’t’ test.

Results:

In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 ?T and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P< 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 ?T field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 ?T PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters.

Conclusions:

Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA).

Keywords: Human chondrocytes, osteoarthritis, pulsed electromagnetic field
MeSh terms: Osteoarthritis, cartilage, articular, chondrocytes, electromagnetic fields

Introduction

Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years.1Clinical use of PEMF preceded systematic research in its utility for bone and joint healing.2 Later studies identified that PEMF is capable of producing significant cellular changes in bone and cartilage cells by proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors.3,4,5,7,8,9,10 A systematic review based on 3 clinical studies which assessed effect of PEMF therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) of knee, incorporating factors like pain, physical function, patient assessment, joint imaging, health related quality of life and physician global assessment indicates that electrical stimulation therapy may be useful in OA of knee, but stresses the need for confirmation in future studies.11 Proteoglycan (PG) loss occurs in joint cartilage in OA and PEMF therapy has been shown to induce PG synthesis in-vivoand in-vitro.12 PEMF has also demonstrated to have positive effect on cellular proliferation and DNA synthesis through opening of voltage sensitive calcium channels.13 Animal models have shown that PEMF therapy retards progression of OA.14,15

Most studies employing PEMF have used frequencies of 6- 75 Hz and field strengths of 0.4- 2.3 milli Tesla (mT). We desired to enquire if low frequency (0.1- 10 Hz), low field strength of 0.65- 1.95 µT and short duration exposure (60 min/day) of PEMF results in favorable effects on cultured human chondrocytes (synthesis of ECM; cell viability, proliferation and morphology). Further need for the study is to arrive at a minimal PEMF exposure protocol that is expected to decrease the concern related to unfavorable cellular changes and chromosomal aberrations that may result with high dose PEMF exposure.16

Materials and Methods

Isolation and characterization of chondrocytes

Articular cartilage samples were obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery after obtaining informed consent from patients. The study protocol was approved by Institutional Ethics Committee. Cartilage tissue over the nonweight bearing portion of the joint was removed and minced in Dulbecco’s modified eagle medium (DMEM) (Biogene technologies, India) supplemented with 10% FBS (Biogene technologies, India) and 1 ml Pen-strep (10000 units of penicillin and 10 mg of streptomycin, Invitrogen, India). Following this, the tissue was transferred into a conical flask and initially digested with pronase (1 mg/ml) (Biogene technologies, India) for 60 min, followed by type II collagenase (1 mg/1ml) (Invitrogen) for 16- 18 hours at 37°C. The following day, cellular debris and undigested tissue were removed and cells were separated using a 100 micron cell strainer. Isolated cells were seeded into 25 cm 2 culture flasks (TPP, India) with DMEM complete medium and maintained at 37°C with 5% CO2 levels. The cells were subcultured on attainment of 80% confluency. The attached cells were characterized by chondrocyte specific anti-Sox 9 transcription factor antibody staining (Abcam, India.). Chondrocytes that failed to form monolayer culture were not processed further. Post characterization, 4 × 105 cells were seeded in each flask and used for PEMF exposure after first passage.

Pulsed electromagnetic field exposure

The PEMF coil system fashioned for exposure is a four member coil frames, two larger (inner) and two smaller (outer) coil frames. The coils are mounted coaxially and in a co-planar fashion to form an enclosure, where it delivers currents in milliamps at desired waveforms, varying frequencies and magnetic field strength (Madras Institute of Magnetobiology, Chennai, India). This system designed according to the parametrical equation of Fansleau and Brauenbeck and a modified version of the Helmhotz coil. A box is housed inside the coil in which a 100 W bulb with regulator was used to maintain the temperature at 37°C and water to maintain humidity. Instead of 5% CO2, 20 mM HEPES was used as a buffering system. The chondrocytes were exposed to PEMF while monitoring field strength, frequency and temperature. The control (unexposed) cells were placed in the same environment and temperature but not exposed to PEMF.

Pulsed electromagnetic field treatment

The chondrocytes were seeded in 25 cm 2 culture flasks at concentrations of 6.5 × 105 cells/ml after 20 h being plated the cells were washed with phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and given fresh medium and exposed to PEMF for the first three daily trials; media was not changed from this point onwards. PEMF at a frequency of 0.1, 1 and 10 Hz were applied with flux densities of 0.65, 1.3 and 1.95 µT (peak-to-peak) for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days. Whereas exposure to PEMFs at a repetition rate of 0.1 and 1 Hz with 1.95 and 0.65 µT caused a significant increase in chondrocyte viability that was dependent on PEMF amplitude, PEMFs applied at a repetition rate of 10 Hz and 1.3 µT did not produce any noticeable effects over cell viability and were not dealt with further in this manuscript. To test for effects of different exposure durations, cells were exposed to PEMFs of 1.95 and 0.65 µT magnitude and at frequency of 0.1 and 1 Hz for 60 min/day for 3 days. Cells were analyzed on third day for further experimental studies.

Cell viability assessment

Chondrocytes were cultured in 96 well plates at a density of 5 × 103 cells per well and exposed to PEMF in accordance to the exposure protocol mentioned. Twenty microliter of 0.5% 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) (Invitrogen) in phosphate buffered saline was added to each well after removal of medium and cells were incubated for 3 h at 37°C. Post incubation, 150 µl dimethyl sulfoxide (Hi-media, India) was added to each well and absorbance values (optical density value) were noted at 570 nm and 695 nm in spectrophotometer.17

Quantitative measurement of extracellular matrix proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis

Chondrocytes were cultured in 48 well plates at densities of 104 cells per well and exposed to PEMF in accordance to the exposure protocol mentioned. Postexposure, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis was quantified by the dimethyl methylene blue (DMMB) assay. The DMMB reagent (Sigma, India) was prepared as detailed by Panin et al.18 and 200 µL was added to each well after removal of culture medium. Subsequently, absorbance values at 525 nm were noted.

Analysis of cell cycle by flow cytometry

Chondrocytes were cultured in 25 cm 2 culture flasks and exposed to PEMFs as mentioned earlier. After exposure, the cells were trypsinized, converted to single cell suspension in PBS and subjected to flow cytometery (FACS calibur, Becton Dickinson, Germany) according to the manufacturer’s instruction (Invitrogen, India) as follows: The suspension was spun at 1000 rpm for 10 min and the cell pellet was fixed in 70% ice cold ethanol at 4°C overnight. The cells were washed with PBS, treated with 500 µl RNAse A (40 µg/ml) (Sigma, India.) for 30 min at 37°C and stained with 500 µl propidium iodide (40 µg/ml) for 15 min incubation at room temperature. Postincubation, cell distributions at distinct phases of the cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometery.

Analysis of cell architecture and morphology

Cell architecture and morphology were analyzed by staining of actin filaments in chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured on cover slips in 6 well culture plates and exposed to PEMFs as described earlier. Processing of cells was done according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Invitrogen, India.). Briefly, the cells were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde solution for 10 min after washing the slide with PBS and permeabilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 for 5 min. After washing with PBS, the cells were stained with 0.05 mg/ml Phalloidin solution at room temperature for 20-30 min, followed by counterstaining with 300 µl Propidium Iodide (500 nM). The coverslips were then rinsed in PBS, placed on a glass slide and cellular architecture and stress fiber formation was qualitatively analyzed by fluorescent confocal microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany).

Statistical analysis

Discrete variables were expressed as number (%) and continuous variables expressed as mean ± Standard Deviation. Association between field strengths (0.65, 1.3, and 1.95 µT) in variable frequencies (0.1, 1, and 10 Hz) and cellular effects (cell viability and ECM production,) was analyzed with paired ‘t’ test. A P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Analysis was done with Statistical Package for the social sciences (SPSS) software version 21.0. This software was released in 2012 and used to solve business and research problems by means of ad-hoc analysis, hypothesis testing and predictive analysis.

Results

Isolation of chondrocytes

Healthy chondrocytes were observed in cultures by 3 days and these monolayers were 80% confluent by a week. The chondrocytes were spherical prior to attachment and later appeared polygonal in shape [Figure 1].

Figure 1

Primary human chondrocytes displaying typical polygonal conformation after attachment

Cell viability assessment

Viability of chondrocytes after PEMF exposure was quantified by the MTT assay to ascertain the effects PEMFs on chondrocytes which were exposed to PEMFs of field intensities between 1.95 and 0.65 µT at frequencies of 0.1 and 1 Hz for 60 min/day for 3 days. Following the third day exposure, samples were treated with MTT to quantify the cell viability and compared to control (unexposed) cultures. A highly significant viability of chondrocyte was observed in following field intensities and frequencies (1.95 µT-0.1Hz [P < 0.001], 1.95 µT -1Hz [P < 0.001] and 0.65 µT-0.1 Hz [P < 0.001]). Moderate favourable response was observed in other field intensities and frequencies [Table 1]. After 3 days of 60 min daily exposure to 1.95 µT PEMFs at a frequency of 0.1 Hz, the total number of cells in the culture increased, indicating heightened viability in response to PEMFs.

Table 1

MTT assay for detection of viable cells after exposure to PEMFs for 3 consecutive days

Quantitative measurement of proteoglycan glycosaminoglycan synthesis

Our spectrophotometric quantification of the ECM components such as GAG and PGs were assayed with identical PEMF parameters (field strengths, frequencies, and days of exposure and duration of exposure) as those used for MTT assay of cell viability with identical results. As compared with previously observed results, favorable responses to the production of ECM components were seen in following field strengths and frequencies (1.95 µT-0.1 Hz [P < 0.001], 1.95 µT -1 Hz [P < 0.001], 0.65 µT-0.1 Hz [P < 0.001], 0.65 µT-1 Hz [P < 0.001], 1.95 µT-10 Hz [P = 0.001] and 0.65 µT-10 Hz [P = 0.001]. Moderate favorable response was observed in other field intensities and frequencies [Table 2]. Our spectrophotometric quantification thus corroborates and strengthen our MTT assay results, indicating that exposure with 1.95 µT field intensity at frequency of 0.1 Hz for 60 min/day was most effective in production of GAG and PG of chondrocytes.

Table 2

DMMB assay for detection of ECM components after exposure to PEMFs for 3 consecutive days

Cell cycle analysis

Cells were analyzed to assess their distribution at different phases of the cell cycle by flow cytometry after staining of DNA with propidium iodide and recording of 106 events for each exposure parameter. The cells distribution in four distinct phases could be recognized in a proliferating cell population: G1, S (DNA synthesis Phase), G2 and M (Mitosis). As both G2 and M phase have an identical DNA content, they could not be discriminated based on their differences in their DNA content. The percentage values were assigned to each population and also dot plot [Figure ?[Figure2a2a and ?andb]b] and histogram [Figure ?[Figure2c2c and ?andd]d] were used to denote the distribution of cells in distinct phases. PEMF at different field strengths and frequencies was found to promote cell cycle progression from the G1 phase to the S and G2-M phases. Cells present in G2-M phase are in dividing state and show increased rate of proliferation. A shift to top of cell population (G2-M) in dot plot shows great proliferation [Figure ?[Figure2a2a and ?andb].b]. Based on the percentage of cells distribution in G2-M phase, proliferation effect was determined at different exposure parameters. Histogram indicates, cells exposed at 0.1 Hz frequency with 1.95 µT of PEMFs show 20.24% of their significant presence in G2-M phase compared to other filed strengths such as 0.65 (18.9%) and 1.3 µT (17.54%) [Figure 2c]. The cells exposed to 1.95 µT of PEMFs at 0.1 Hz frequency shows 20.24% of their significant presence in G2-M phase compared to other frequencies such as 1 Hz (19.46%) and 10 Hz (17.83%) [Figure 2d].

Figure 2

Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometer to determine the proliferative effect of chondrocytes in distinct cell cycle phases. Percentage of chondrocytes distribution in G2-M phase indicates cell proliferation effects as it has all mitotic cells. Significant

Analysis of cell architecture and morphology

Actin filaments of the cytoplasm stained by Phalloidin and nucleus was counterstained with propidium iodide observed by confocal fluorescent microscopy showed a significant difference in morphological structure and formation of stress fibers between exposed chondrocytes at varying frequencies (0.1, 1 and, 10 Hz) with specific field strength 1.95 µT and unexposed cells. Stress fiber formation was increased in chondrocytes exposed at frequency of 0.1 Hz with 1.95 µT compared to unexposed [Figure 3]. Stress fiber formation indicates that the cells stability, strength and their healthy attachment.

Figure 3

Human chondrocytes morphological structure was studied by staining with phalloidin and propidium iodide for visualizing stress fibers (green) and nuclear staining (red). (a) No stress fiber formation in chondrocytes unexposed to pulsed electromagnetic

Discussion

Our study observed that short term in-vitro chondrocyte exposure to PEMFs at frequency of 0.1 Hz and field strength of 1.95 µT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days have shown highly significant effects in different experimental parameters such as cell viability, ECM production, cell cycle progression and stress fiber formation. By contrast, exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 µT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant levels of different parameters. On the other hand, exposure to 1.3 µT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not shown any significant effects in different analytical parameters. These findings, apart from observing benefits of certain range of field strengths, also bring to light the ability of PEMF to inhibit cellular effects when used at certain field strengths and frequencies, a fact which has been observed earlier.

In our study design, we limited our experiments to within 3 days of exposure to PEMF to stay within the realm of better clinical applicability. For our analysis, we have chosen 3 days as an appropriate end point as it avoided the over confluence of chondrocytes and also it would minimize the contact inhibition that can induce changes in biochemical status and cause dedifferentiation. As the number of days of exposure to PEMFs increases, it may enhance the proliferative effects to the chondrocytes. The design of longer day exposure to PEMFs will be taken into future study. PEMF parameters used in this study such as frequency, field strength and duration of exposure could translate into the clinical application and will be innocuous to the target tissue and their surrounding tissues which are exposed to PEMF during clinical therapy.

Our study observed correlation between critical cell characteristics (cell viability and promotion in cell multiplication) of exposed samples and induction of extracellular components which include GAG and PG. This raises the question on the validity of using changes in ECM components as a marker of chondrocyte healing in studies using in-vitro models.

The earliest in-vitro study with bovine articular chondrocytes exposed using Helmholtz coils found no significant effect of PEMF on ECM component synthesis.19 Sakai and colleagues studied the effect of 0.4 mT field strength at 6.4 Hz delivered over a period of 5 days on rabbit growth cartilage and human articular cartilage and observed that PEMF stimulated cell proliferation and GAG synthesis in growth cartilage cells but resulted in only cell proliferation with no increase in GAG content in articular cartilage cells.20 The latter finding of our observation on extracellular components (GAG and PG) synthesis is comparable with earlier studies observation.

De Mattei et al. exposed chondrocytes from healthy patients to PEMF to varying duration of exposure (1- 18 h and 1- 6 days) using a field strength of 2.3 mT at 75 Hz. The study observed that short duration of exposure (1 and 6 h) did not result in increased DNA synthesis, while longer duration of exposure (9 and 18 h) increased DNA synthesis.21 Chang et al., exposed porcine chondrocytes to a field of 1.8- 3 mT at a frequency of 75 Hz for 2 h/day for 3 weeks and observed that long term 3 weeks PEMF exposure was beneficial over the short term 1 week exposure.22 However, our observations contradict these findings and reports the better efficacy of even short term PEMF exposures. Though our study observed the efficacy of a daily PEMF exposure of 60 min for only 3 days, benefits of exposure should be expected to enhance with daily exposures exceeding 3 days. We could not observe the benefits beyond day 3, since confluent chondrocyte cultures de-differentiated due to contact inhibition beyond this period in two-dimensional cultures.

Our observation on promotion of cell cycle from G1 phase to G2-M phase with certain field strengths is comparable with the findings of Nicolin et al. which observed similar results with field strength of 2 mT at 75 Hz with an exposure time of 4 h or 12 h/day.23 The striking observation of similar findings in our study with much lower field strength for exposure duration of 60 min has better clinical applicability.

A recent in-vivo animal study exposed rabbits with experimental osteochondral defect to PEMF for a period of 60 min/day for 6 weeks and observed a better total histological score in the study group to conclude that PEMF is beneficial for hyaline cartilage formation.24 The only in-vitro study on human chondrocytes harvested from OA knee reports no effect on PG production using field strength of 2mT at 50 Hz for 14 days.25 However both studies did not evaluate fine cellular effects (cell viability and cell cycle promotion).

Based on our data, the study informs that the future in-vitro studies on the topic should probably use exposure duration not more than 60 min/day but we can increase more number of days to PEMFs at 0.1 and 1 Hz frequencies and 1.95 and 0.65 µT field intensities. However, future studies should aim to utilize collagen matrix in three-dimensional (3D) cultures and focus more on exposure for more number of days to overcome the limitation of dedifferentiation and contact inhibition due to over confluent in 3D model and also focus on the effect of PEMF on chondrocyte cytoskeleton (observed as stress fibers in Phalloidin staining). It would of interest to investigate the strength of the chondrocyte cytoskeleton between exposed and control cells. Though it may be argued that occurrence of stress fiber formation observed with PEMF exposure is a result of heating effect due to Helmholtz system, the low dose of PEMF is less likely to have produced a heating effect which may happen with higher doses.

To conclude, our study observed that short duration (60 min/day) low frequency (0.1 Hz) low field strength (1.95 µT) PEMFs have beneficial effects on chondrocyte viability, ECM production, multiplication and probably cytoskeleton even for a short period of 3 days. Short duration PEMF exposure for patients with OA has the potential to produce favorable clinical effects. However, the results of the study have to be confirmed with a methodology incorporating assessment of both mass and strength of PEMF exposed chondrocytes.

Financial support and sponsorship

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (DIPAS), Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), Ministry of Defence, Government of India.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1. Vallbona C, Richards T. Evolution of magnetic therapy from alternative to traditional medicine. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 1999;10:729–54. [PubMed]
2. Bassett CA, Mitchell SN, Schink MM. Treatment of therapeutically resistant non unions with bone grafts and pulsing electromagnetic fields. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1982;64:1214–20. [PubMed]
3. De Mattei M, Caruso A, Traina GC, Pezzetti F, Baroni T, Sollazzo V. Correlation between pulsed electromagnetic fields exposure time and cell proliferation increase in human osteosarcoma cell lines and human normal osteoblast cells in vitro. Bioelectromagnetics. 1999;20:177–82. [PubMed]
4. Smith RL, Nagel DA. Effects of pulsing electromagnetic fields on bone growth and articular cartilage.Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1983;181:77–82. [PubMed]
5. Ciombor DM, Lester G, Aaron RK, Neame P, Caterson B. Low frequency EMF regulates chondrocyte differentiation and expression of matrix proteins. J Orthop Res. 2002;20:40–50. [PubMed]
6. De Mattei M, Pasello M, Pellati A, Stabellini G, Massari L, Gemmati D, et al. Effects of electromagnetic fields on proteoglycan metabolism of bovine articular cartilage explants. Connect Tissue Res. 2003;44:154–9. [PubMed]
7. De Mattei M, Pellati A, Pasello M, Ongaro A, Setti S, Massari L, et al. Effects of physical stimulation with electromagnetic field and insulin growth factor-I treatment on proteoglycan synthesis of bovine articular cartilage. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2004;12:793–800. [PubMed]
8. Lohmann CH, Schwartz Z, Liu Y, Guerkov H, Dean DD, Simon B, et al. Pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation of MG63 osteoblast-like cells affects differentiation and local factor production. J Orthop Res.2000;18:637–46. [PubMed]
9. Heermeier K, Spanner M, Träger J, Gradinger R, Strauss PG, Kraus W, et al. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) on collagen type I mRNA expression and extracellular matrix synthesis of human osteoblastic cells. Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19:222–31. [PubMed]
10. Hartig M, Joos U, Wiesmann HP. Capacitively coupled electric fields accelerate proliferation of osteoblast-like primary cells and increase bone extracellular matrix formation in vitro. Eur Biophys J.2000;29:499–506. [PubMed]
11. Hulme J, Robinson V, DeBie R, Wells G, Judd M, Tugwell P. Electromagnetic fields for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;1:D003523. [PubMed]
12. De Mattei M, Fini M, Setti S, Ongaro A, Gemmati D, Stabellini G, et al. Proteoglycan synthesis in bovine articular cartilage explants exposed to different low-frequency low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007;15:163–8. [PubMed]
13. Bourguignon GJ, Jy W, Bourguignon LY. Electric stimulation of human fibroblasts causes an increase in Ca2+influx and the exposure of additional insulin receptors. J Cell Physiol. 1989;140:379–85. [PubMed]
14. Ciombor DM, Aaron RK, Wang S, Simon B. Modification of osteoarthritis by pulsed electromagnetic field – A morphological study. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003;11:455–62. [PubMed]
15. Fini M, Giavaresi G, Torricelli P, Cavani F, Setti S, Canè V, et al. Pulsed electromagnetic fields reduce knee osteoarthritic lesion progression in the aged Dunkin Hartley guinea pig. J Orthop Res. 2005;23:899–908. [PubMed]
16. Khalil AM, Qassem W. Cytogenetic effects of pulsing electromagnetic field on human lymphocytes in vitro: Chromosome aberrations, sister-chromatid exchanges and cell kinetics. Mutat Res. 1991;247:141–6.[PubMed]
17. Li X, Peng J, Xu Y, Wu M, Ye H, Zheng C, et al. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) promotes chondrocyte proliferation via pushing the progression of cell cycle. J Med Plant Res. 2011;5:3896–903.
18. Panin G, Naia S, Dall’Amico R, Chiandetti L, Zachello F, Catassi C, et al. Simple spectrophotometric quantification of urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycan sulfates. Clin Chem. 1986;32:2073–6. [PubMed]
19. Elliott JP, Smith RL, Block CA. Time-varying magnetic fields: Effects of orientation on chondrocyte proliferation. J Orthop Res. 1988;6:259–64. [PubMed]
20. Sakai A, Suzuki K, Nakamura T, Norimura T, Tsuchiya T. Effects of pulsing electromagnetic fields on cultured cartilage cells. Int Orthop. 1991;15:341–6. [PubMed]
21. De Mattei M, Caruso A, Pezzetti F, Pellati A, Stabellini G, Sollazzo V, et al. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on human articular chondrocyte proliferation. Connect Tissue Res. 2001;42:269–79.[PubMed]
22. Chang SH, Hsiao YW, Lin HY. Low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure accelerates chondrocytic phenotype expression on chitosan substrate. Orthopedics. 2011;34:20. [PubMed]
23. Nicolin V, Ponti C, Baldini G, Gibellini D, Bortul R, Zweyer M, et al. In vitro exposure of human chondrocytes to pulsed electromagnetic fields. Eur J Histochem. 2007;51:203–12. [PubMed]
24. Boopalan PR, Arumugam S, Livingston A, Mohanty M, Chittaranjan S. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy results in healing of full thickness articular cartilage defect. Int Orthop. 2011;35:143–8.[PMC free article] [PubMed]
25. Schmidt-Rohlfing B, Silny J, Woodruff S, Gavenis K. Effects of pulsed and sinusoid electromagnetic fields on human chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen matrix. Rheumatol Int. 2008;28:971–7. [PubMed]

Articles from Indian Journal of Orthopaedics are provided here courtesy of Medknow Publications

Central Nervous System Disorders

Curr Alzheimer Res. 2015;12(9):860-9.

Cognitive Improvement by Photic Stimulation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Zhang Y, Wang F, Luo X, Wang L, Sun P, Wang M, Jiang Y, Zou J, Uchiumi O, Yamamoto R, Sugai T, Yamamoto K, Kato N1.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa 920-0293, Japan. kato@kanazawa-med.ac.jp.

Abstract

We previously reported that activity of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (big-K, BK) channel is suppressed by intracellular A? in cortical pyramidal cells, and that this suppression was reversed by expression of the scaffold protein Homer1a in 3xTg Alzheimer’s disease model mice. Homer1a is known to be expressed by physiological photic stimulation (PS) as well. The possibility thus arises that PS also reverses A?-induced suppression of BK channels, and thereby improves cognition in 3xTg mice. This possibility was tested here. Chronic application of 6-hour-long PS (frequency, 2 Hz; duty cycle, about 1/10; luminance, 300 lx) daily for 4 weeks improved contextual and tone-dependent fear memory in 3xTg mice and, to a lesser extent, Morris water maze performance as well. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was also enhanced after PS. BK channel activity in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells and lateral amygdalar principal cells, suppressed in 3xTg mice, were facilitated. In parallel, neuronal excitability, elevated in 3xTg mice, was recovered to the control level. Gene expression of BK channel, as well as that of the scaffold protein Homer1a, was found decreased in 3xTg mice and reversed by PS. It is known that Homer1a is an activity-dependently inducible immediate early gene product. Consistently, our previous findings showed that Homer1a induced by electrical stimulation facilitated BK channels. By using Homer1a knockouts, we showed that the present PS-induced BK channel facilitation is mediated by Homer1a expression. We thus propose that PS might be potentially useful as a non-invasive therapeutic measure against Alzheimer’s disease.

Exp Brain Res. 2016 Jul 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Near-infrared light treatment reduces astrogliosis in MPTP-treated monkeys.

El Massri N1, Moro C2, Torres N2, Darlot F2, Agay D2, Chabrol C2, Johnstone DM3, Stone J3, Benabid AL2, Mitrofanis J4.

Author information

  • 1Department of Anatomy F13, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006, Australia.
  • 2University Grenoble Alpes, CEA, LETI, CLINATEC, MINATEC Campus, 38000, Grenoble, France.
  • 3Department of Physiology F13, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006, Australia.
  • 4Department of Anatomy F13, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006, Australia. john.mitrofanis@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

We have reported previously that intracranial application of near-infrared light (NIr) reduces clinical signs and offers neuroprotection in a subacute MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) monkey model of Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we explored whether NIr reduces the gliosis in this animal model. Sections of midbrain (containing the substantia nigra pars compacta; SNc) and striatum were processed for glial fibrillary acidic protein (to label astrocytes; GFAP) and ionised calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (to label microglia; IBA1) immunohistochemistry. Cell counts were undertaken using stereology, and cell body sizes were measured using ImageJ. Our results showed that NIr treatment reduced dramatically (~75 %) MPTP-induced astrogliosis in both the SNc and striatum. Among microglia, however, NIr had a more limited impact in both nuclei; although there was a reduction in overall cell size, there were no changes in the number of microglia in the MPTP-treated monkeys after NIr treatment. In summary, we showed that NIr treatment influenced the glial response, particularly that of the astrocytes, in our monkey MPTP model of Parkinson’s disease. Our findings raise the possibility of glial cells as a future therapeutic target using NIr.

BMC Neurosci. 2016 May 18;17(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12868-016-0259-6.

Comparative assessment of phototherapy protocols for reduction of oxidative stress in partially transected spinal cord slices undergoing secondary degeneration.

Ashworth BE1,2, Stephens E1,2, Bartlett CA1, Serghiou S3, Giacci MK1, Williams A3, Hart NS1,4, Fitzgerald M5.

Author information

  • 1Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences, School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.
  • 2Department of Biology and Biochemistry, The University of Bath, Bath, UK.
  • 3Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
  • 4Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
  • 5Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences, School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. lindy.fitzgerald@uwa.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Red/near-infrared light therapy (R/NIR-LT) has been developed as a treatment for a range of conditions, including injury to the central nervous system (CNS). However, clinical trials have reported variable or sub-optimal outcomes, possibly because there are few optimized treatment protocols for the different target tissues. Moreover, the low absolute, and wavelength dependent, transmission of light by tissues overlying the target site make accurate dosing problematic.

RESULTS:

In order to optimize light therapy treatment parameters, we adapted a mouse spinal cord organotypic culture model to the rat, and characterized myelination and oxidative stress following a partial transection injury. The ex vivo model allows a more accurate assessment of the relative effect of different illumination wavelengths (adjusted for equal quantal intensity) on the target tissue. Using this model, we assessed oxidative stress following treatment with four different wavelengths of light: 450 nm (blue); 510 nm (green); 660 nm (red) or 860 nm (infrared) at three different intensities: 1.93 × 10(16) (low); 3.85 × 10(16) (intermediate) and 7.70 × 10(16) (high) photons/cm(2)/s. We demonstrate that the most effective of the tested wavelengths to reduce immunoreactivity of the oxidative stress indicator 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) was 660 nm. 860 nm also provided beneficial effects at all tested intensities, significantly reducing oxidative stress levels relative to control (p ? 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that R/NIR-LT is an effective antioxidant therapy, and indicate that effective wavelengths and ranges of intensities of treatment can be adapted for a variety of CNS injuries and conditions, depending upon the transmission properties of the tissue to be treated.

 

Acta Cirurgica Brasileira

On-line version ISSN 1678-2674

Acta Cir. Bras. vol.30 no.9 São Paulo Sep. 2015

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0102-865020150090000005

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The influence of low-level laser irradiation on spinal cord injuries following ischemia- reperfusion in rats1

Amir Sotoudeh I   , Amirali Jahanshahi II   , Saeed Zareiy III   , Mohammad Darvishi IV   , Nasim Roodbari V   , Ali Bazzazan VI  

IAssistant Professor, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Kahnooj Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Kerman, Iran. Design, analysis and interpretation of data; manuscript writing

IIResearcher, Elite Club, Kahnooj Branch, IAU, Kerman, Iran. Design and acquisition of data

IIIResident, Aerospace and Subaquatic Medicine School, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Branch, and Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran. Technical procedures, acquisition and interpretation of data

IVAssociate Professor, Department of Infection Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Analysis and interpretation of data, statistical analysis

VAssistant Professor, Faculty of Experimental Science, Kahnooj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kerman, Iran. Analysis of data, manuscript writing

VIGraduate student, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Garmsar Branch, IAU, Semnan, Iran. Acquisition and interpretation of data.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE:

To investigate if low level laser therapy (LLLT) can decrease spinal cord injuries after temporary induced spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion in rats because of its anti-inflammatory effects.

METHODS:

Forty eight rats were randomized into two study groups of 24 rats each. In group I, ischemic-reperfusion (I-R) injury was induced without any treatment. Group II, was irradiated four times about 20 minutes for the following three days. The lesion site directly was irradiated transcutaneously to the spinal direction with 810 nm diode laser with output power of 150 mW. Functional recovery, immunohistochemical and histopathological changes were assessed.

RESULTS:

The average functional recovery scores of group II were significantly higher than that the score of group I (2.86 ± 0.68, vs 1.38 ± 0.09; p<0.05). Histopathologic evaluations in group II were showed a mild changes in compare with group I, that suggested this group survived from I-R consequences. Moreover, as seen from TUNEL results, LLLT also protected neurons from I-R-induced apoptosis in rats.

CONCLUSION:

Low level laser therapy was be able to minimize the damage to the rat spinal cord of reperfusion-induced injury.

INTRODUCTION

Neurologic injuries due to I-R of the spinal cord has an incidence of between 2.9% and 23%1. Pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal cell death after spinal cord I-R injury include energy failure, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress2 , 3.There are some applications which can reduce spinal cord I-R injuries such as hypothermia, vascular shunting, left heart bypass, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials, single clamp technique and reimplantation of major intercostal arteries4  6. Also, there are experimental studies like ischemic preconditioning and adjunctive medications for reducing the incidence of this complication7. Despite several surgical modifications and pharmacologic approaches, postoperative spinal cord dysfunction has not been totally eliminated8.

Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has photochemical reactions with cell membranes, cellular organelles and enzymes. LLLT can induce a complex chain of physiological reactions by increasing mitochondrial respiration, activating transcription factors, reducing key inflammatory mediators, inhibiting apoptosis, stimulating angiogenesis, and increasing neurogenesis to enhance wound healing, tissue regeneration and reduce acute inflammation9 , 10. LLLT has been clinically applied to treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal disease, pain management and healing of wounds and burns11  13. Many studies approved that LLLT has the potential to be an effective noninvasive therapy for spinal cord injury14 , 15.

The aim of this study is to evaluate if LLLT can protect rats spinal cord from I-R injury, so we hypothesized that LLLT would attenuate immunohistochemical and histopathological changes and improve functional recovery after the ischemia/ reperfusion-induced spinal cord injury in rats.

METHODS

Animal care and experiments were carried out in accordance with the National Institutes of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NIH publications No. 8023). Forty eight male Wistar rats weighing 400-450g were used in this study. Anesthesia was induced by intramuscular injection of ketamine hydrochloride 60 mg/kg and xylazine 10 mg/kg. A longitudinal incision was made through the skin on the abdominal region and the abdominal aorta was exposed through midline laparotomy. Heparin (250 UI/kg) was administered intravenously before aortic clamping. Spinal cord ischemia was induced by crossclamping for 60 min, using Bulldog forceps (Figure 1).

Vascular clamps were placed under the left renal vein and above the bifurcation in the aorta. Then the forceps were removed and the chest closed routinely. Animals were placed in their cages after recovery. Rats were randomly assigned to two groups.

FIGURE 1 Surgical site: the ventral aorta was exposed and clamped by Bulldog forceps for 60 minutes. 

In control group (group I), I-R injury was induced but not irradiated with the laser beam. The irradiation protocol was applied as Byrnes described previously16. Briefly in treatment group (group II), 15 minutes after I-R induction on the spinal cord, the lesion site as a rectangular, about 3 cm2(3 cm length×1 cm width) was irradiated transcutaneously to the spinal direction with 810 nm diode laser (Thor International, UK;) with output power of 150 mW. The dosage applied to the surface of the skin was 1,589 J/cm2 per day (0.53 W/cm2, 450 J). Irradiation was repeated daily for the following 3 consecutive days. In each day, irradiation was applied 4 times about 20 minutes with contact mode.

Neurologic scoring system

The Neurologic deficits of animals were evaluated on postoperative 72 hour by a single trained blinded observer by using the following scoring:

Grade 0: paraplegia with no lower extremity motor function;

Grade 1: poor lower extremity motor function;

Grade 2: good movement of the hind limbs, but unable to stand;

Grade 3: able to stand but unable to walk normally; Grade 4: complete recovery17.

Spinal cord histopathologic examination

All animals were anesthetized with lethal dose of pentobarbital (25 mg/kg). Spinal cords were dissected totally and fixed in 10% formalin and embedded in paraffin with routine procedures. Sections from fourth to sixth lumbar segment were obtained. The spinal cord tissues were embedded in paraffin and serial transverse sections (5 µm) cut from paraffin blocks and stained with hemotoxylin and eosin for histopathologic examination. Histopathologic evaluations were performed with means of light microscopy by a neuropathologist who was blinded to experimental conditions.

TUNEL staining

TUNEL staining was performed by an in situ cell death detection kit (Roche, Germany). Hematoxylin was used to counterstain the sections. Quantitative analysis was performed blindly by counting the number of TUNEL positive neurons in the ventral horns in five microscopic fields as described previously18.

Statistical analysis

All data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Statistical analysis of the neurologic scores were analyzed by using KruskalWallis one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The investigators were blinded to the treatments. Values for statistical analyses were considered significant at p<0.05. All analyses were performed by using the SPSS software package (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill).

RESULTS

Neurological evaluations presented in Table 1. In the group I, the neurological scores was lower. Although in the group II, the Tarlov scale increased and showed a significant difference after 72h of reperfusion (p<0.05).

TABLE 1 – Neurologic status 72 hours after reperfusion as evaluated by the modified Tarlov neurologic recovery scale. 

score Group I (Control) N=24 Group II (Treatment) N=24
0 8 1
1 7 3
2 3 5
3 4 4
4 2 11
Mean ± SD 1.38 ± 0.09 2.86 ± 0.68*

*Mean neurologic scores showed a significant difference between control and treatment groups (p<0.05) both at 72h after reperfusion.

Histopathologic evaluations in group I, presented that had severe ischemic injury with inclusive necrosis of gray matter, which enclosed typically necrotic nuroglia cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, and loss of cytoplasmic structures. In addition the numbers of normal nuroglia cells were apparently reduced in this group and neuronal structural alterations were observed, which included oligodendrocytes pyknosis, light staining tigroid body, nucleus’s atrophy of nuroglia cell and nucleolus disappearance of oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, hemorrhagic macules were scattered into tissue structures and vacuolar changes were observed in the cytoplasm (Figure 2). The histopathologic changes in group II were milder than that observed in the group I, and the gray matter architecture was generally preserved, with most nuroglia cells appearing to have survived the ischemic consequences (Figure 3).

FIGURE 2 The neurons of spinal cord anterior horn of group I were assessed by H&E staining and viewed at the magnification of 200 times which presented group necrotic changes with prominent vacuolization, intensely eosinophilic cytoplasm, Nissl granule loss, and pyknosis (arrows) as well as by the presence of infiltrating neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes severe percellular edema and glial cell proliferation. 

FIGURE 3 The neurons of spinal cord anterior horn of group II were assessed by H&E staining and viewed at the magnification of 200 times which showed relative preservation of tissue architecture along with almost complete protection of the neurons, vascular structures, and glial cells along with only mild per cellular edema. The arrows indicate ischemia neuron cells showing mildly eosinophilic cytoplasm, Nissl body loss, and pyknosis. 

Average TUNEL-positive cell counts are shown in Table 2. These data show that the group II exhibited significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells compared with the group I.

TABLE 2 – Quantitative analysis of the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the ventral horn of spinal cord of all groups, 72h after reperfusion. 

Group I (Control) II (Treatment)
Number of TUNEL-posetive motor neurons Mean SD (n=24) 73.04 0.3 Mean SD (n=24) 36.50** 0.6

*Mean Quantitative analysis showed a significant difference between control and treatment groups (p<0.05) both at 72h after reperfusion.

It is understandable that the number of TUNEL-positive neurons decreased significantly after laser therapy, suggesting that LLLT may protect spinal cords from I-R apoptosis. Spinal cord sections were stained with TUNEL and observed at the light microscopic level (400 times magnification). In the spinal cord ventral horn of the group I, amount of vacuoles appeared and numerous TUNEL-positive neurons were observed (Figure 4). By contrary, very few positively stained neurons were observed in group II (Figure 5).

FIGURE 4 TUNEL staining and quantification of apoptotic motor neurons after reperfusion (×400). Many TUNEL-positive neurons with intense nucleus staining were visible in group I. The arrows indicate TUNEL-positive motor neurons. 

FIGURE 5 TUNEL staining and quantification of apoptotic motor neurons after reperfusion (×400). Only a small number of positively stained neurons were observed in the group II. The arrows TUNELpositive motor neurons. 

DISCUSSION

Our results showed that LLLT will be able to reduce the damages of spinal cord after I-R in rats. This result was verified by both neurological and histological and observations. Additionally, Functional recovery of LLLT group was significantly improved when compared with control group.

Spinal cord I-R injury is a persistent clinical problem in surgical repair of thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurism surgeries19 , 20. The major cause of spinal cord injury, during and after aortic surgery to the occurrence of one or more of the three following events: (I) the duration and degree of ischaemia; (II) failure to re-establish blood flow to the spinal cord after repair; (III) a biochemically mediated reperfusion injury21. Reperfusion is the restoration of blood flow to the organ after a period of ischaemia. Reperfusion of ischaemic neuronal tissues leads to release production of oxygen derived free radicals, produced as a result of incomplete oxygenation during the period of ischaemia22. Inflammatory response with production of cytokines by microglia and activated neutrophils also contributes to generation of these radicals23 , 24. Several different surgical strategies and laboratory studies have been developed in attempt to decrease the risk of this devastating complication25  27. However, neurological injury in thoracoabdomial surgery remains one of the greatest unsolved mysteries28  30.

The therapeutic effects of LLLT have been reported, being associated with production of anti-apoptotic, pro-proliferative, antioxidant, and angiogenic factors31  33. LLLT also known as photobiomodulation, is an emerging therapeutic approach in which cells or tissues are exposed to low-levels of red and near-IR light. Its experimental applications have broadened to include serious diseases such as heart attack, stroke, and spinal cord injury. Oron et al, suggested that a transcranial application of LLLT after traumatic brain injury provides a significant long-term functional neurological benefit and decreases brain tissue loss34. In another research applied LLLT in acute Spinal cord injury caused by of trauma which promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery35.

LLLT may have beneficial effects in the acute treatment of I-R by reducing inflammatory mediators, inhibiting apoptosis, stimulating angiogenesis, and increasing neurogenesis9. Transcranial LLLT applied after ischemic stroke in rats caused a significant improvement of neurological score compared to sham animals36.

We hypothesized that LLLT would effectively protect spinal cord by its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. To our knowledge, the present study probably is the first study to evaluating the neuroprotective effects of LLLT in attenuating I-R induced neurologic injury to the rat spinal cord. It is known that functional recovery after I-R is highly correlated with the volume of remaining normal nerve fibers in spinal tissue37. Adno et al.11, demonstrated transcutaneous application of 810-nm nonpolarized laser significantly promoted axonal regrowth, our results are in agreement with that and show association of improved neurologic status.

Byrnes et al.16, found that 810 nm light, at a dosage of 1.589 J/cm2, significantly improves axonal regrowth, functional improvement and statistically significant suppression of immune cell invasion and pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression. Similarly we documented that LLLT had efficient protection on neural cells from apoptosis or necrosis. Also decreased inflammatory cell accumulation in the spinal cords of animals that received LLLT as compared with the control group also supports LLLT proposed anti-inflammatory property and may contribute to neuroprotection.

CONCLUSION

Low level laser therapy protects the spinal cord from ischemia-reperfusion injury spinal cord ischemia and provide better locomotor function in rats which may be related to antiinflammatory properties of that.

REFERENCES

1.  Cambria RP, Davison JK, Zannetti S, L’Italien G, Brewster DC, Gertler JP, Moncure AC, LaMuraglia GM, Abbott WM. Clinical experience with epidural cooling for spinal cord protection during thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair. J VascSurg. 1997;25:234-41. PMID: 9052558. [ Links ]

2.  Choi DW. Glutamate neurotoxicity and diseases of the nervous system. Neuron. 1998;1:623-34. PMID: 2908446. [ Links ]

3.  Dawson TM, Dawson VL, Synder SH. A novel messenger in brain: the free radical, nitric oxide. Ann Neurol. 1992;32:297-311. PMID: 1384420. [ Links ]

4.  Akgun S, Tekeli A, Kurtkaya O, Civelek A, Isbir SC, Ak K, Arsan S, Sav A. Neuroprotective effects of FK-506, L-carnitine and azathioprine on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2004;25:105-10. PMID: 14690740. [ Links ]

5.  Okita Y, Takamoto S, Ando M, Morota T, Yamaki F, Matsukawa R, Kawashima Y. Repair of aneurysms of the entire descending thoracic aorta or thoracoabdominal aorta using a deep hypothermia. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 1997;12:120-6. PMID: 9262092. [ Links ]

6.  Cambria RP, Giglia JS. Prevention of spinal cord ischemic complications after thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1998;15:96-109. PMID: 9551047. [ Links ]

7.  Isbir CS, Ak K, Kurtkaya O, Zeybek U, Akgun S, Scheitauer BW, Sav A, Cobanoglu A. Ischemic preconditioning and nicotinamide in spinalcord protection in an experimental model of transient aortic occlusion. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2003;23:1028-33. PMID: 12829083. [ Links ]

8.  Kiziltepe U, Turan NND, Han U, Ulus AT, Akar F. Resveratrol, a red wine polyphenol, protects spinal cord from ischemia-reperfusion injury. J Vasc Surg. 2004;40(1):138-45. PMID: 15218474. [ Links ]

9.  Hashmi JT, Huang YY, Osmani BZ, Sharma SK, Naeser MA, Hamblin MR. Role of low-level laser therapy in neurorehabilitation. PM R. 2010 Dec;2(12 Suppl 2):S292-305. doi: 10.1016/j. pmrj.2010.10.013. [ Links ]

10.  Hamblin M, Huang YY, Wu Q, Xuan W, Ando T, Xu T, Sharma S, Kharkwal G. Low-level light therapy aids traumatic brain injury. Biomed Opt Med Imaging. 2011;10:1-3. doi: 10.1117/2.1201102.003573. [ Links ]

11.  Ando T, Sato S, Kobayashi H, Nawashiro H, Ashida H, Hamblin MR, Obara M. Low-level laser therapy for spinal cord injury in rats: effects of polarization. J Biomed Opt. 2013;18(9):1-6. PMID: 24030687. [ Links ]

12.  Ekim A, Armagan O, Tascioglu F, Oner C, Colak M. Effect of low level laser therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Swiss Med Wkly. 2007;137(23-24):347-52. PMID: 17629805. [ Links ]

13.  Simunovic Z, Ivanovich AD, Depolo A. Wound healing of animal and human body sport and traffic accident injuries using low-level laser therapy treatment: a randomized clinical study of seventy-four patients with control group. J Clin Laser Med Surg. 2000;18(2):6773. PMID: 11800105. [ Links ]

14.  Rochkind S, Shahar A, Amon M, Nevo Z. Transplantation of embryonal spinal cord nerve cells cultured on biodegradable microcarriers followed by low power laser irradiation for the treatment of traumatic paraplegia in rats. Neurol Res. 2002;24(4):355-60. PMID: 12069281. [ Links ]

15.  Rochkind S. Photoengineering of neural tissue repair processes in peripheral nerves and the spinal cord: research development with clinical applications. Photomed Laser Surg. 2006;24(2):151-7. PMID: 16706693. [ Links ]

16.  Byrnes KR, Waynant RW, Ilev IK, Wu X, Barna L, Smith K, Heckert R, Gerst H, Anders JJ. Light promotes regeneration and functional recovery and alters the immune response after spinal cord injury. Lasers Surg Med. 2005;36:171-85. PMID: 15704098. [ Links ]

17.  Tarlov IM, Klinger H. Spinal cord compression studies. II. Time limits for recovery after acute compression in dogs. AMA Arch Neurol Psychiatry. 1954 Mar;71(3):271-90. PMID: 13123590. [ Links ]

18.  Shan LQ, Ma S, Qiu XC, Zhou Y, Zhang Y, Zheng LH, Ren PC, Wang YC, Fan QY, Ma BA. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A protects spinal cords from ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits. Neuroscience. 2010;11:98. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-11-98. [ Links ]

19.  Liang CL, Lu K, Liliang PC, Chen TB, Chan SHH, Chen HJ. Ischemic preconditioning ameliorates spinal cord ischemiareperfusion injury by triggering autoregulation. J Vasc Surg. 2012 Apr;55(4):1116-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jvs.2011.09.096. [ Links ]

20.  Ilhan A, Koltuksuz U, Ozen S, Uz E, Ciralik H, Akyol O. The effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on spinal cordischemia/ reperfusion injury in rabbits. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 1999;16:45863. PMID: 10571095. [ Links ]

21.  Svensson LG. New and future approaches for spinal cord protection. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1997;9(3):206-21. PMID: 9263340. [ Links ]

22.  Wan IYP, Angelini GD, Bryan AJ, Ryder I, Underwood MJ. Prevention of spinal cord ischaemia during descending thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2001;19:203-13. PMID: 11167113. [ Links ]

23.  Ilhan A, Koltuksuz U, Ozen S, Uz E, Ciralik H, Akyol O. The effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on spinal cord ischemia/ reperfusion injury in rabbits. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 1999;16:45863. PMID: 10571095. [ Links ]

24.  Garcia JH, Liu KF, Yoshida Y, Lian J, Chen S, Del Zoppo G. Influx of leukocytes and platelets in an evolving brain infarct. Am J Pathol. 1994;144:188-99. PMID: 8291608. [ Links ]

25.  Etz CD, Luehr M, Kari FA, Bodian CA, Smego D, Plestis KA, Griepp RB. Paraplegia after extensive thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: does critical spinal cord ischemia occur postoperatively? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008;135:324-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2007.11.002. [ Links ]

26.  Bisdas T, Redwan A, Wilhelmi M, Haverich A, Hagl C, Teebken O, Pichlmaier M. Less-invasive perfusion techniques may improve outcome in thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2010;(21)140:1319-24. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2010.01.012. [ Links ]

27.  Matsuda H, Ogino H, Fukuda T, Iritani O, Sato S, Iba Y, Tanaka H, Sasaki H, Minatoya K, Kobayashi J, Yagihara T. Multi disciplinary approach to prevent spinal cord ischemia after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair for distal descending aorta. Ann Thorac Surg. 2010;90:561-5. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2010.04.067. [ Links ]

28.  Cunningham JJN, Laschinger JC, Merkin HA, Nathan IM, Colvin S, Ransohoff J, Spencer FC. Measurement of spinal cord ischemia during operations upon the thoracic aorta. Ann Surg. 1982;144:574. doi: 10.1097/00000658-198209000-00007. [ Links ]

29.  Laschinger JC, Cunningham JJN, Nathan IM, Knopp EA, Cooper MM, Spencer FC. Experimental and clinical assessment of the adequacy of partial bypass in maintenance of spinal cord blood flow. Ann Thorac Surg. 1983;36:417-26. PMID: 6625737. [ Links ]

30.  Cunningham JNJ. Spinal cord ischemia. Introduction. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1998;10:3-5. PMID: 9469770. [ Links ]

31.  Huang YY, Chen ACH, Carroll JD, Hamblin MR. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy. Dose Response. 2009;7(4):35883. doi: 10.2203/dose-response.09-027.Hamblin. [ Links ]

32.  Huang YY, Sharma SK, Carroll JD, Hamblin MR. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy, an update. Dose Response. 2011;9(4):602-18. doi: 10.2203/dose-response.11-009.Hamblin. [ Links ]

33.  Xuan W, Vatansever F, Huang L, Wu Q, Xuan Y, Dai T, Ando T, Xu T, Huang YY, Hamblin MR. Transcranial low-level laser therapy improves neurological performance in traumatic brain injury in mice: effect of treatment repetition regimen. PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53454. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053454. [ Links ]

34.  Oron A, Oron U, Streeter J, de Taboada L, Alexandrovich A, Trembovler V, Shohami E. Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. J Neurotrauma. 2007;24(4):651-6. PMID: 17439348. [ Links ]

35.  Wu X, Dmitriev AE, Cardoso MJ, Viers-Costello AG, Borke RC, Streeter J, Anders JJ. 810nm Wavelength light: an effective therapy for transected or contused rat spinal cord. Lasers Surg Med. 2009 Jan;41(1):36-41. doi: 10.1002/lsm.20729. [ Links ]

36.  Detaboada L, Ilic S, Leichliter-Martha S, Oron U, Oron A, Streeter J. Transcranial application of low-energy laser irradiation improves neurological deficits in rats following acute stroke. Lasers Surg Med. 2006 Jan;38(1):70-3. PMID: 16444697. [ Links ]

37.  You SW, Chen BY, Liu HL, Lang B, Xia JL, Jiao XY, Ju G. Spontaneous recovery of locomotion induced by remaining fibers after spinal cord transection in adult rats. Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2003;21(1-2):39-45. PMID: 12808201. [ Links ]

Financial source: Islamic Azad University

1Research performed at Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Kahnooj Branch.

Received: May 06, 2015; Revised: July 07, 2015; Accepted: August 04, 2015

Correspondence:Amir Sotoudeh Islamic Azad University Kahnooj Branch Kahnooj, Iran Phone: 00989121768066 Fax: 00983495230203 dramirsotoudeh@kahnoojiau.ac.ir

Conflict of interest: none

 This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Neurophotonics. 2016 Jul;3(3):031404. doi: 10.1117/1.NPh.3.3.031404. Epub 2016 Mar 4

Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

Cassano P1, Petrie SR2, Hamblin MR3, Henderson TA4, Iosifescu DV5.

Author information

  • 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Depression Clinical and Research Program, One Bowdoin Square, 6th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States; Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, 401 Park Drive, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, United States.
  • 2Massachusetts General Hospital, Depression Clinical and Research Program, One Bowdoin Square, 6th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States.
  • 3Massachusetts General Hospital, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States; Harvard Medical School, Department of Dermatology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States; Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States.
  • 4Synaptic Space, 3979 East Arapahoe Road, Littleton, Colorado 80122, United States; Neuro-Laser Foundation, Suite 420, 215 South Wadsworth, Lakewood, Colorado 80226, United States.
  • 5Mount Sinai Medical School, Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, 1428 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10029, United States; Mount Sinai Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, New York 10029, United States.

Abstract

We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: “near-infrared radiation,” “NIR,” “low-level light therapy,” “low-level laser therapy,” or “LLLT” plus “depression.” We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD.

J Exp Neurosci. 2016 Feb 1;10:1-19. doi: 10.4137/JEN.S33444. eCollection 2016.

Neuroprotective Effects Against POCD by Photobiomodulation: Evidence from Assembly/Disassembly of the Cytoskeleton.

Liebert AD1, Chow RT2, Bicknell BT3, Varigos E4.
Author information
1University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2Brain and Mind Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4Olympic Park Clinic, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Abstract
Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a decline in memory following anaesthesia and surgery in elderly patients. While often reversible, it consumes medical resources, compromises patient well-being, and possibly accelerates progression into Alzheimer’s disease. Anesthetics have been implicated in POCD, as has neuroinflammation, as indicated by cytokine inflammatory markers. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is an effective treatment for a number of conditions, including inflammation. PBM also has a direct effect on microtubule disassembly in neurons with the formation of small, reversible varicosities, which cause neural blockade and alleviation of pain symptoms. This mimics endogenously formed varicosities that are neuroprotective against damage, toxins, and the formation of larger, destructive varicosities and focal swellings. It is proposed that PBM may be effective as a preconditioning treatment against POCD; similar to the PBM treatment, protective and abscopal effects that have been demonstrated in experimental models of macular degeneration, neurological, and cardiac conditions.
J Neurosurg. 2015 Nov 27:1-13. [Epub ahead of print]

Intracranial application of near-infrared light in a hemi-parkinsonian rat model: the impact on behavior and cell survival.

 Reinhart F1, Massri NE2, Chabrol C1, Cretallaz C1, Johnstone DM3, Torres N1, Darlot F1, Costecalde T1, Stone J3, Mitrofanis J2, Benabid AL1, Moro C1.
 Author information
1CEA, Leti, and Clinatec Departments, University Grenoble Alpes, Minatec Campus, Grenoble, France; and
2Departments of 2 Anatomy and.
3Physiology, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Abstract
OBJECT The authors of this study used a newly developed intracranial optical fiber device to deliver near-infrared light (NIr) to the midbrain of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, a model of Parkinson’s disease. The authors explored whether NIr had any impact on apomorphine-induced turning behavior and whether it was neuroprotective.
METHODS Two NIr powers (333 nW and 0.16 mW), modes of delivery (pulse and continuous), and total doses (634 mJ and 304 J) were tested, together with the feasibility of a midbrain implant site, one considered for later use in primates. Following a striatal 6-OHDA injection, the NIr optical fiber device was implanted surgically into the midline midbrain area of Wistar rats. Animals were tested for apomorphine-induced rotations, and then, 23 days later, their brains were aldehyde fixed for routine immunohistochemical analysis.
RESULTS The results showed that there was no evidence of tissue toxicity by NIr in the midbrain. After 6-OHDA lesion, regardless of mode of delivery or total dose, NIr reduced apomorphine-induced rotations at the stronger, but not at the weaker, power. The authors found that neuroprotection, as assessed by tyrosine hydroxylase expression in midbrain dopaminergic cells, could account for some, but not all, of the observed behavioral improvements; the groups that were associated with fewer rotations did not all necessarily have a greater number of surviving cells. There may have been other “symptomatic” elements contributing to behavioral improvements in these rats.
CONCLUSIONS In summary, when delivered at the appropriate power, delivery mode, and dosage, NIr treatment provided both improved behavior and neuroprotection in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2014 Aug;34(8):1391-401. doi: 10.1038/jcbfm.2014.95. Epub 2014 May 21.

Low-level laser therapy effectively prevents secondary brain injury induced by immediate early responsive gene X-1 deficiency.

Zhang Q1, Zhou C1, Hamblin MR2, Wu MX2.

Author information

  • 11] Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 21] Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [3] Affiliated faculty member of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

A mild insult to the brain can sometimes trigger secondary brain injury, causing severe postconcussion syndrome, but the underlying mechanism is ill understood. We show here that secondary brain injury occurs consistently in mice lacking immediate early responsive gene X-1 (IEX-1), after a gentle impact to the head, which closely simulates mild traumatic brain injury in humans. The pathologic lesion was characterized by extensive cell death, widespread leukocyte infiltrates, and severe tissue loss. On the contrary, a similar insult did not induce any secondary injury in wild-type mice. Strikingly, noninvasive exposure of the injured head to a low-level laser at 4 hours after injury almost completely prevented the secondary brain injury in IEX-1 knockout mice. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) suppressed proinflammatory cytokine expression like interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 but upregulated TNF-?. Moreover, although lack of IEX-1 compromised ATP synthesis, LLLT elevated its production in injured brain. The protective effect of LLLT may be ascribed to enhanced ATP production and selective modulation of proinflammatory mediators. This new closed head injury model provides an excellent tool to investigate the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury as well as the mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of LLLT.

  J Biomed Opt. 2013;18(12):128005. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.128005.

Near-infrared stimulation on globus pallidus and subthalamus.

Yoo M1, Koo H2, Kim M2, Kim HI3, Kim S4.

 1Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Department of Medical System Engineering, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

  • 2Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Iksan, Republic of Korea.
  • 3Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Department of Medical System Engineering, Gwangju, Republic of KoreacGwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), School of Mechatronics, Gwangju, Republic of KoreadPresbyterian Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Jeonju, Republic of Korea.
  • 4Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Department of Medical System Engineering, Gwangju, Republic of KoreacGwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), School of Mechatronics, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Near-infrared stimulation (NIS) is an emerging technique used to evoke action potentials in nervous systems. Its efficacy of evoking action potentials has been demonstrated in different nerve tissues. However, few studies have been performed using NIS to stimulate the deep brain structures, such as globus pallidus (GP) and subthalamic nucleus (STN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into GP stimulation group (n=11) and STN stimulation group (n=6). After introducing optrodes stereotaxically into the GP or STN, we stimulated neural tissue for 2 min with continuous near-infrared light of 808 nm while varying the radiant exposure from 40 to 10 mW. The effects were investigated with extracellular recordings and the temperature rises at the stimulation site were also measured. NIS was found to elicit excitatory responses in eight out of 11 cases (73%) and inhibitory responses in three cases in the GP stimulation group, whereas it predominantly evoked inhibitory responses in seven out of eight cases (87.5%) and an excitatory response in one case in STN stimulation group. Only radiation above 20 mW, accompanying temperature increases of more than 2°C, elicited a statistically significant neural response (p<0.05). The responsiveness to NIS was linearly dependent on the power of radiation exposure.

J Neurotrauma. 2014 Jun 1;31(11):1008-17. doi: 10.1089/neu.2013.3244. Epub 2014 May 8.

Significant improvements in cognitive performance post-transcranial, red/near-infrared light-emitting diode treatments in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: open-protocol study.

Naeser MA1, Zafonte R, Krengel MH, Martin PI, Frazier J, Hamblin MR, Knight JA, Meehan WP 3rd, Baker EH.

Author information

  • 11 VA Boston Healthcare System , Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

This pilot, open-protocol study examined whether scalp application of red and near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) could improve cognition in patients with chronic, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially in hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. LED therapy is noninvasive, painless, and non-thermal (cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration [FDA], an insignificant risk device). Eleven chronic, mTBI participants (26-62 years of age, 6 males) with nonpenetrating brain injury and persistent cognitive dysfunction were treated for 18 outpatient sessions (Monday, Wednesday, Friday, for 6 weeks), starting at 10 months to 8 years post- mTBI (motor vehicle accident [MVA] or sports-related; and one participant, improvised explosive device [IED] blast injury). Four had a history of multiple concussions. Each LED cluster head (5.35 cm diameter, 500 mW, 22.2 mW/cm(2)) was applied for 10 min to each of 11 scalp placements (13 J/cm(2)). LEDs were placed on the midline from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. Neuropsychological testing was performed pre-LED, and at 1 week, and 1 and 2 months after the 18th treatment. A significant linear trend was observed for the effect of LED treatment over time for the Stroop test for Executive Function, Trial 3 inhibition (p=0.004); Stroop, Trial 4 inhibition switching (p=0.003); California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)-II, Total Trials 1-5 (p=0.003); and CVLT-II, Long Delay Free Recall (p=0.006). Participants reported improved sleep, and fewer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, if present. Participants and family reported better ability to perform social, interpersonal, and occupational functions. These open-protocol data suggest that placebo-controlled studies are warranted.

Lasers Med Sci. 2014 May 24. [Epub ahead of print]

 “Low-intensity laser therapy effect on the recovery of traumatic spinal cord injury”

Paula AA1, Nicolau RA, Lima MD, Salgado MA, Cogo JC.
  • 1Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP&D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (Univap), São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Scientific advances have been made to optimize the healing process in spinal cord injury. Studies have been developed to obtain effective treatments in controlling the secondary injury that occurs after spinal cord injury, which substantially changes the prognosis. Low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been applied in neuroscience due to its anti-inflammatory effects on biological tissue in the repairing process. Few studies have been made associating LILT to the spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the LILT (GaAlAs laser-780 nm) on the locomotor functional recovery, histomorphometric, and histopathological changes of the spinal cord after moderate traumatic injury in rats (spinal cord injury at T9 and T10). Thirty-one adult Wistar rats were used, which were divided into seven groups: control without surgery (n?=?3), control surgery (n?=?3), laser 6 h after surgery (n?=?5), laser 48 h after surgery (n?=?5), medullar lesion (n?=?5) without phototherapy, medullar lesion?+?laser 6 h after surgery (n?=?5), and medullar lesion?+?laser 48 h after surgery (n?=?5). The assessment of the motor function was performed using Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale and adapted Sciatic Functional Index (aSFI). The assessment of urinary dysfunction was clinically performed. After 21 days postoperative, the animals were euthanized for histological and histomorphometric analysis of the spinal cord. The results showed faster motor evolution in rats with spinal contusion treated with LILT, maintenance of the effectiveness of the urinary system, and preservation of nerve tissue in the lesion area, with a notorious inflammation control and increased number of nerve cells and connections. In conclusion, positive effects on spinal cord recovery after moderate traumatic spinal cord injury were shown after LILT.

J Cereb Blood Flow Metab.  2014 May 21. doi: 10.1038/jcbfm.2014.95. [Epub ahead of print]

Low-level laser therapy effectively prevents secondary brain injury induced by immediate early responsive gene X-1 deficiency.

Author information

  • 11] Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 21] Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [3] Affiliated faculty member of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

A mild insult to the brain can sometimes trigger secondary brain injury, causing severe postconcussion syndrome, but the underlying mechanism is ill understood. We show here that secondary brain injury occurs consistently in mice lacking immediate early responsive gene X-1 (IEX-1), after a gentle impact to the head, which closely simulates mild traumatic brain injury in humans. The pathologic lesion was characterized by extensive cell death, widespread leukocyte infiltrates, and severe tissue loss. On the contrary, a similar insult did not induce any secondary injury in wild-type mice. Strikingly, noninvasive exposure of the injured head to a low-level laser at 4 hours after injury almost completely prevented the secondary brain injury in IEX-1 knockout mice. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) suppressed proinflammatory cytokine expression like interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 but upregulated TNF-?. Moreover, although lack of IEX-1 compromised ATP synthesis, LLLT elevated its production in injured brain. The protective effect of LLLT may be ascribed to enhanced ATP production and selective modulation of proinflammatory mediators. This new closed head injury model provides an excellent tool to investigate the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury as well as the mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of LLLT.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 21 May 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.95.

Alzheimers Res Ther. 2014; 6(1): 2.
Published online Jan 3, 2014. doi:  10.1186/alzrt232

Photobiomodulation with near infrared light mitigates Alzheimer’s disease- related pathology in cerebral cortex – evidence from two transgenic mouse models.

Sivaraman Purushothuman,1,2 Daniel M Johnstone,corresponding author1,2 Charith Nandasena,1,2 John Mitrofanis,1,3 and Jonathan Stone1,2
Author information ? Article notes ? Copyright and License information ?

Introduction

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic, debilitating neurodegenerative disease with limited therapeutic options; at present there are no treatments that prevent the physical deterioration of the brain and the consequent cognitive deficits. Histopathologically, AD is characterised by neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of hyperphosphorylated tau protein and amyloid-beta (A?) plaques [1,2]. The extent of these histopathological features is considered to vary with and to determine clinical disease severity [2]. While the initiating pathogenic events underlying AD are still debated, there is strong evidence to suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have important roles in the neurodegenerative cascade [35]. Therefore, it has been proposed that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction could prove valuable for AD therapeutics [6].

One safe, simple yet effective approach to the repair of damaged mitochondria is photobiomodulation with near-infrared light (NIr). This treatment, which involves the irradiation of tissue with low intensity light in the red to near-infrared wavelength range (600 to 1000 nm), was originally pioneered for the healing of superficial wounds [7] but has been recently shown to have efficacy in protecting the central nervous system. While the mechanism of action remains to be elucidated, there is evidence that NIr preserves and restores cellular function by reversing dysfunctional mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, thereby mitigating the production of reactive oxygen species and restoring ATP production to normal levels [8,9].

To date, NIr treatment has yielded neuroprotective outcomes in animal models of retinal damage [9,10], traumatic brain injury [11,12], Parkinson’s disease [1315] and AD [16,17]. Furthermore, NIr therapy has yielded beneficial outcomes in clinical trials of human patients with mild to moderate stroke [18] and depression [19]. This treatment represents a promising alternative to drug therapy because it is safe, easy to apply and has no known side-effects at levels even higher than optimal doses [20].

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of NIr in mitigating the brain pathology and associated cellular damage that characterise AD. We utilised two mouse models, each manifesting distinct AD-related pathologies: the K3 tau transgenic model, which develops NFTs [21,22]; and the APP/PS1 transgenic model, which develops amyloid plaques [23]. Here, we present histochemical evidence that NIr treatment over a period of 1 month reduces the severity of AD-related pathology and oxidative stress and restores mitochondrial function in brain regions susceptible to neurodegeneration in AD, specifically the neocortex and hippocampus. The findings extend our previous NIr work in models of acute neurodegeneration [13,14] to demonstrate that NIr is also effective in protecting the brain against chronic insults due to AD-related genetic aberrations, a pathogenic mechanism that is likely to more closely model the human neurodegenerative condition.

Methods

Mouse models

The K3 transgenic mouse model, originally generated as a model of frontotemporal dementia [21,22], harbours a human tau gene with the pathogenic K369I mutation; expression is driven by the neuron-specific mThy1.2 promoter. This model manifests high levels of hyperphosphorylated tau and NFTs by 2 to 3 months of age and cognitive deficits by about 4 months of age [21,22]. We commenced our experiments on K3 mice and matched C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) controls at 5 months of age, when significant neuropathology is already present.

The APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mouse model, obtained from the Jackson Laboratory (Stock number 004462; Bar Harbor, ME, USA), harbours two human transgenes: the amyloid beta precursor protein gene (APP) containing the Swedish mutation; and the presenilin-1 gene (PS1) containing a deletion of exon 9 [23]. The APP/PS1 mice exhibit increased A? and amyloid plaques by 4 months of age [24] and cognitive deficits by 6 months of age [25]. We commenced our experiments on APP/PS1 mice and matched C57BL/6 × C3H WT controls at 7 months of age, when numerous amyloid plaques and associated cognitive deficits are present.

Genotyping of mice was achieved by extracting DNA from tail tips through a modified version of the Hot Shot preparation method [26] and amplifying the transgene sequence by polymerase chain reaction. As reported previously, K3 mice were identified using the primers 5-GGGTGTCTCCAATGCCTGCTTCTTCAG-3 (forward) and 5-AAGTCACCCAGCAGGGAGGTGCTCAG-3 (reverse) [21,22] and APP/PS1 mice were genotyped using primers 5-AGGACTGACCACTCGACCAG-3 (forward) and 5-CGGGGGTCTAGTTCTGCAT-3 (reverse) [23].

Experimental design

For each series of experiments on K3 mice (aged 5 months) or APP/PS1 mice (aged 7 months) there were three experimental groups: untreated WT mice, untreated transgenic mice and NIr-treated transgenic mice (n = 5 mice per experimental group for the K3 series, 15 mice in total; n = 6 mice per experimental group for the APP/PS1 series, 18 mice in total). Our design did not include a WT control group exposed to NIr because NIr has no detectable impact on the survival and function of cells in normal healthy brain [1315]. Given the consistency of the previous results, use of animals for this extra control group did not seem justified [27].

Mice in the NIr-treated groups were exposed to one 90-second cycle of NIr (670 nm) from a light-emitting device (LED) (WARP 10; Quantum Devices, Barneveld, WI, USA) for 5 days per week over 4 consecutive weeks. Light energy emitted from the LED during each 90-second treatment equates to 4 Joule/cm2; a total of 80 Joule/cm2 was delivered to the skull over the 4 weeks. Our measurements of NIr penetration across the fur and skull of a C57BL/6 mouse indicate that ~2.5% of transmitted light reaches the cortex.

For each treatment, the mouse was restrained by hand and the LED was held 1 to 2 cm above the head. The LED light generated no heat and reliable delivery of the radiation was achieved [1315]. For the sham-treated WT, K3 and APP/PS1 groups, animals were restrained in the same way and the device was held over the head, but the light was not switched on. This treatment regime is similar to that used in previous studies where beneficial changes to neuropathology and behavioural signs were reported [1315].

Experimental animals were housed two or more to a cage and kept in a 12-hour light (<5 lux)/dark cycle at 22°C; food pellets and water were available ad libitum. All protocols were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee of the University of Sydney.

Histology and immunohistochemistry

At the end of the experimental period, mice were anaesthetised by intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg) and perfused transcardially with 4% buffered paraformaldehyde. Brains were post fixed for 3 hours, washed with phosphate-buffered saline and cryoprotected in 30% sucrose/phosphate-buffered saline. Tissue was embedded in OCT compound (ProSciTech, Thuringowa, QLD, Australia) and coronal sections of the neocortex and the hippocampus (between bregma ?1.8 and ?2.1) were cut at 20 ?m thickness on a Leica cryostat (Nussloch, Germany).

Immunohistochemistry

For most antibodies, antigen retrieval was achieved using sodium citrate buffer with 0.1% Triton. Sections were blocked in 10% normal goat serum and then incubated overnight at 4°C with a mouse monoclonal antibody – paired helical filaments-tau AT8, 1:500 (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium); 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), 1:200 (JaICA, Fukuroi, Shizuoka, Japan); 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-OHDG), 1:200 (JaICA); COX, 1:200 (MitoSciences, Eugene, OR, USA) – and/or a rabbit polyclonal antibody (200 kDa neurofilament, 1:500; Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA). Sections were then incubated for 3 hours at room temperature in Alexa Fluor-488 (green) and/or Alexa Fluor-594 (red) tagged secondary antibodies specific to host species of the primary antibodies (1:1,000; Molecular Probes, Carlsbad, CA, USA). Sections were then counterstained for nuclear DNA with bisbenzimide (Sigma).

Two different but complementary antibodies were used to label A? peptide: 6E10, which recognises residues 1 to 16; and 4G8, which recognises residues 17 to 24. We have previously used these two antibodies in combination to validate A? labelling, demonstrating identical labelling patterns in the rat neocortex and hippocampus [28]. For double labelling using 6E10 antibodies (1:500; Covance, Princeton, NJ, USA) and anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies (1:1,000; DAKO, Glostrup, Denmark), antigen retrieval was achieved by incubation in 90% formic acid for 10 minutes, and primary antibody incubation was carried out overnight at room temperature. For labelling using the 4G8 (1:500; Covance) antibody, slides were treated with 3% H2O2 in 50% methanol, incubated in 90% formic acid and then washed several times in dH2O before the blocking step, as described previously [28]. After blocking, sections were incubated overnight at room temperature with 4G8 antibody. Sections were then incubated in biotinylated goat anti-mouse IgG for 1 hour followed by ExtrAvidin peroxidase for 2.5 hours. The sections were then washed and developed with 3,3?-Diaminobenzidine.

Negative control sections were processed in the same fashion as described above except that primary antibodies were omitted. These control sections were immunonegative. Fluorescent images were taken using a Zeiss Apotome 2, Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany. Brightfield images were taken using a Nikon Eclipse E800, Nikon Instruments, Melville, NY, USA.

Histology

NFTs were assessed using the Bielschowsky silver staining method, as described previously [21,22]. Briefly, sections were placed in prewarmed 10% silver nitrate solution for 15 minutes, washed and then placed in ammonium silver nitrate solution at 40°C for a further 30 minutes. Sections were subsequently developed for 1 minute and then transferred to 1% ammonium hydroxide solution for 1 minute to stop the reaction. Sections were then washed in dH2O, placed in 5% sodium thiosulphate solution for 5 minutes, washed, cleared and mounted in dibutyl phathalate xylene.

As described previously [28], A? plaques were studied by staining with Congo red, a histological dye that binds preferentially to compacted amyloid with a ?-sheet secondary structure [29]. Briefly, sections were treated with 2.9 M sodium chloride in 0.01 M NaOH for 20 minutes and were subsequently stained in filtered alkaline 0.2% Congo red solution for 1 hour.

Morphological analysis

Staining intensity and area measurements

To quantify the average intensity and area of antibody labelling within the neocortex and hippocampal regions, an integrated morphology analysis was undertaken using MetaMorph software. For each section, the level of nonspecific staining (using an adjacent region of unstained midbrain) was adjusted to a set level to ensure a standard background across different groups. Next, outlines of retrosplenial cortex area 29 and hippocampal CA1 region were traced and the average intensity and area of immunostaining were calculated by the program. Measurements were conducted on ?4 representative sections per animal and ?3 animals per experimental group. Statistical analyses were performed in Prism 5.0 (Graphpad, La Jolla, CA, USA) using one-way analysis of variance with Tukey’s multiple comparison post test. All values are given as mean ± standard error of mean.

Amyloid-beta plaque measurements

Digital brightfield images of 4G8 staining in the neocortical and hippocampal regions (between bregma ?1.8 and ?2.1) were taken at 4× magnification and analysed with Metamorph, Molecular Devices LLC, Sunnyvale, CA, USA. The software was programmed to measure the number of plaques and the average size of plaques after thresholding for colour. The percentage of area covered by plaques (plaque burden) was calculated by multiplying the number of plaques by the average size of plaques, divided by the area of interest, as described previously [30]. The average number of Congo red-positive plaques in the APP/PS1 brain regions was estimated using the optical fractionator method (StereoInvestigator; MBF Science, Williston, VT, USA), as outlined previously [14]. Briefly, systematic random sampling of sites was undertaken using an unbiased counting frame (100 ?m × 100 ?m). All plaques that came into focus within the frame were counted. Measurements were conducted on ?4 representative sections per animal and ?3 animals per experimental group. Plaque numbers and size were analysed using a two-tailed unpaired t test (when variances were equal) or Welch’s t test (when variances were unequal). All values are given as mean ± standard error of mean. For all analyses, investigators were blinded to the experimental groups.

Results

Evidence of NIr-induced neuroprotection is presented from the neocortex (retrosplenial area) and the hippocampus (CA1 and subiculum), two cortical regions affected in the early stages of human AD [2].

Near-infrared light mitigates the tau pathology of K3 cortex

Hyperphosphorylation of the neuronal microtubule stabilising protein tau and the resulting NFTs are much studied features of dementia pathology [2,31]. The K3 mouse model manifests hyperphosphorylated tau and NFTs by 2 to 3 months of age and cognitive deficits by about 4 months of age [21,22]. We observe strong labelling for hyperphosphorylated tau in the neocortex and the hippocampus at 6 months of age; expression appears to plateau after this age, with similar labelling observed in 12-month-old mice (Figure 1A,B,C,D,E,F).

Figure 1

Figure 1

Time course of the natural development of cortical pathology in K3 and APP/PS1 mice. (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), (F) Micrographs of hyperphosphorylated tau labelling (red), using the AT8 antibody, in the neocortex (A to C) and hippocampus (D toF) of untreated 

In the retrosplenial area of the neocortex there was a significant overall difference in AT8 immunolabelling for tau between the experimental groups, both when considering average intensity of labelling (P < 0.01 by analysis of variance; Figure 2A) and labelled area (P < 0.01; Figure 2B). Tukeypost hoc testing revealed significant differences between the untreated K3 group and the other two groups; labelling was much stronger and more widespread in K3 mice than WT controls (17-fold higher intensity, P < 0.01), and this labelling was reduced by over 70% in NIr-treated mice (P < 0.05). Interestingly, there was no significant difference between the WT and K3-NIr groups, suggesting that NIr treatment had reduced hyperphosphorylated tau to control levels in K3 mice. A similar trend was observed when considering the NFT pathology (Figure 2C,D,E). In contrast to WT brain, which showed no NFT-like lesions (Figure 2C), the K3 brain contained many ovoid shaped NFT-like lesions (that is, spheroids; Figure 2D). Such structures were less frequent in the K3-NIr brain (Figure 2E).

Figure 2

Figure 2

Effect of near-infrared light treatment on hyperphosphorylated tau and neurofibrillary tangles in the neocortex of K3 mice. (A), (B) Quantification of tau AT8 immunolabelling, based on average labelling intensity (A) and labelled area (B). All error bars 

Similar effects were observed in the hippocampus (Figure 3). There was a significant overall difference between the experimental groups in AT8 immunolabelling of the CA1 pyramidal cells (P < 0.01). As for the neocortex, K3 mice showed far greater labelling than WT mice (17-fold higher intensity, P < 0.01) and this was reduced over 65% by NIr treatment (P < 0.01). Again, there were no significant differences between the WT and K3-NIr groups (P > 0.05). Bielschowsky silver staining of the subiculum (Figure 3C,D,E) revealed axonal swellings and spheroids in the hippocampal region of K3 mice (Figure 3D), which were less pronounced in mice from the K3-NIr group (Figure 3E). No pathology was observed in the hippocampus of WT mice (Figure 3C).

Figure 3

Figure 3

Effect of near-infrared light treatment on hyperphosphorylated tau and neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus of K3 mice. (A), (B) Quantification of tau AT8 immunolabelling, based on average labelling intensity (A) and labelled area (B). All error 

One should note that the large white matter pathways associated with the hippocampus were labelled intensely by silver staining in all three groups (Figure 3C,D,E). This labelling has been described previously and is not associated with any neuropathology [32].

Near-infrared light reduces oxidative stress in K3 cortex

Oxidative stress and damage are common features of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, and may be a precursor to neuronal death [35]. We assessed two common markers of oxidative stress: 4-HNE, a toxic end-product of lipid peroxidation that may bind to proteins that then trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular apoptosis in AD [33]; and 8-OHDG, a marker for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA oxidation, which is elevated in AD brains [34].

Overall, 4-HNE immunoreactivity in the neocortex was significantly different between the experimental groups (Figure 4), by both average labelling intensity (P < 0.01) and labelled area (P < 0.001). As with AT8 labelling above, the K3 group showed a much higher average 4-HNE labelling intensity and area than the WT group (fivefold and 20-fold, respectively) and this labelling was significantly reduced (by 50% and 80%, respectively) in the K3-NIr group. Again, these measures showed no significant differences between the WT and K3-NIr groups (P > 0.05).

Figure 4

Figure 4

Effect of near-infrared light treatment on oxidative stress markers in the neocortex of K3 mice. (A), (B), (F), (G)Quantification of immunolabelling of two oxidative stress markers, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE; A, B) and 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine 

Similar patterns were observed for 8-OHDG immunoreactivity. Overall, there was a significant difference between the groups for 8-OHDG immunolabelling, by both average intensity (P < 0.0001) and labelled area (P < 0.0001). Again the K3 group showed significantly higher 8-OHDG labelling intensity and area than the WT group (sixfold and 17-fold, respectively), and the 8-OHDG labelling intensity and area were significantly reduced in the K3-NIr group relative to untreated K3 (65% and 85% reduction, respectively). The intensity and area of 8-OHDG labelling did not differ significantly between the WT and the K3-NIr groups (P > 0.05), suggesting that NIr treatment reduces markers of oxidative stress to control levels. The representative photomicrographs of 8-OHDG immunoreactivity in the retrosplenial area (Figure 4H,I,J) reflect the quantitative data, with many 8-OHDG+ structures in the K3 group (Figure 4I) but not in the WT and K3-NIr groups (Figure 4H,J)

Near-infrared light mitigates mitochondrial dysfunction in K3 cortex

We assessed expression patterns of the mitochondrial enzyme COX in the neocortex and the hippocampus as a marker of mitochondrial function. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in the patterns of COX immunoreactivity between the different experimental groups, both in the neocortex and the hippocampus (both P < 0.0001; Figure 5). Relative to WT mice, the COX labelling intensity and area were reduced in K3 mice in both the neocortex and the hippocampus (>70% and >75% reductions, respectively). The K3-NIr mice showed a significant recovery of COX immunoreactivity relative to untreated K3 mice in both the neocortex (>1.7-fold increase, P < 0.05) and the hippocampus (>3.4-fold increase, P < 0.001). However, recovery was not complete, with K3-NIr mice having significantly lower COX immunoreactivity than WT mice in the neocortex (~50%, P < 0.001) and significantly lower COX labelling intensity (~20%, P < 0.05) in the hippocampus. These two groups did not differ significantly in COX labelling area in the hippocampus (P > 0.05).

Figure 5

Figure 5

Effect of near-infrared light treatment on cytochrome coxidase labelling in the neocortex and hippocampus of K3 mice. (A), (B), (F), (G) Quantification of immunolabelling of the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in the neocortex retrosplenial 

Near-infrared mitigates amyloid pathology in APP/PS1 cortex

Along with NFTs, A? plaques are considered a primary pathological hallmark of AD and A? load is often used as a marker of AD severity [1,35]. We assessed the distribution of A? plaques and more immature forms of the A? peptide in the neocortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice aged 7 months; this age is after the first signs of intracellular A? within cells (at 3 months; Figure 1G) and extracellular A? plaques (at 4.5 and 12 months; Figure 1H and ?and1I,1I, respectively).

Three quantitative measures of plaque pathology were used: percentage plaque burden, average plaque size and number of plaques. Immunohistochemical labelling with the anti-A? antibody 4G8 revealed a significant reduction in percentage plaque burden (Figure 6A,D), average plaque size (Figure 6B,E) and number of plaques (Figure 6C,F) in both the neocortex and the hippocampus of NIr-treated APP/PS1 mice relative to untreated APP/PS1 controls. Percentage plaque burden was reduced by over 40% in the neocortex (Figure 6A; P < 0.001) and over 70% in the hippocampus (Figure 6D; P < 0.01), average plaque size was reduced 25% in the neocortex (Figure 6B) and 30% in the hippocampus (Figure 6E), and the number of plaques was reduced by over 20% in the neocortex (Figure 6C) and by over 55% in the hippocampus (Figure 6F; all P < 0.05).

Figure 6

Figure 6

Effect of near-infrared light on amyloid-beta and plaque pathology in APP/PS1 mice. (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), (F)Quantification of amyloid-beta (A?) 4G8 immunolabelling of amyloid plaques in the neocortex (A, B, C) and hippocampus (D, E, F), based 

The photomicrographs of the 4G8 immunoreactivity in Figure 6 reflect the quantitative data described earlier. The WT brain is free of plaques (Figure 6H,K); many 4G8+ plaques (arrows) are present in the neocortex (Figure 6I) and the hippocampus (Figure 6L) of untreated APP/PS1 mice, and fewer plaques are present in NIr-treated APP/PS1 mice (Figure 6J,M). Comparable immunolabelling was achieved using the 6E10 anti-A? antibody (data not shown).

A similar but less pronounced trend was observed when staining with Congo red (Figure 7), which stains only mature plaques. Mean counts of plaques in the neocortex (Figure 7A) and the hippocampus (Figure 7B) of NIr-treated APP/PS1 brains were lower than mean counts in untreated APP/PS1 brains (reductions >30%). However, the differences did not reach statistical significance; given the findings described above with the 4G8 and 6E10 anti-A? antibodies, this suggests that NIr may have greatest effect on recently formed A? deposits. The micrographs in Figure 7 show that mature plaques were absent from the WT brain (Figure 7C,D) but were present in the neocortex (Figure 7E) and hippocampus (Figure 7F) of untreated APP/PS1 brains. There appeared to be fewer plaques in the NIr-treated APP/PS1 brains (Figure 7G,H).

Figure 7

Figure 7

Effect of near-infrared light on Congo red-positive plaque numbers in APP/PS1 mice. (A), (B) Quantification of Congo red-positive plaque counts in the neocortex (A) and hippocampus(B). All error bars indicate standard error of the mean. (C), (D), (E), 

Discussion

Using two mouse models with distinct AD-related pathologies (tau pathology in K3, amyloid pathology in APP/PS1), we report evidence that NIr treatment can mitigate the pathology characteristic of AD as well as reduce oxidative stress and restore mitochondrial function in brain regions affected early in the disease. Further, the extent of mitigation – to levels less than at the start of treatment – suggests that NIr can reverse some elements of AD-related pathology.

The present results add to our previous findings of NIr-induced neuroprotection in models of toxin-induced acute neurodegeneration (that is, MPTP-induced parkinsonism). When incorporated into the growing body of evidence that NIr can also protect against CNS damage in models of stroke, traumatic brain injury and retinal degeneration [912,36], the findings provide a basis for trialling NIr treatment as a strategy for protection against neurodegeneration from a range of causes. Present evidence is based on the use of multiple methods, immunohistochemical and histological, to demonstrate pathological features (for example, 4G8 antibody labelling and Congo red staining for amyloid plaques, AT8 antibody labelling and Bielschowsky silver staining for NFTs).

Relationship to previous studies

The present study focused on pathological features considered characteristic of AD, as well as on signs of cellular damage (for example, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction) that have been demonstrated in AD and in animal models [24]. Our observations in the K3 strain add to previous studies by providing the first evidence in this strain of extensive oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction [27].

Our findings are consistent with previous reports of the effects of red to infrared light on AD pathology in animal models. De Taboada and colleagues assessed the capacity of 808 nm laser-sourced infrared radiation, delivered three times per week over 6 months, to reduce pathology in an APP transgenic model of A? amyloidosis [17]. Treatment led to a reduction in plaque number, amyloid load and inflammatory markers, an increase in ATP levels and mitochondrial function, and mitigation of behavioural deficits. De Taboada and colleagues commenced treatment at 3 months of age, before the expected onset of amyloid pathology and cognitive effects. Similarly, Grillo and colleagues reported that 1,072 nm infrared light, applied 4 days per week for 5 months, reduces AD-related pathology in another APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model (TASTPM) [16]. These investigators also initiated light treatment before the onset of pathology, at 2 months of age. Both studies thus provide evidence that infrared radiation can slow the progression of cerebral degeneration in these models. The present results confirm these observations, in two distinct transgenic strains; they also confirm that the wound-healing and neuroprotective effects of red-infrared length do not vary qualitatively with wavelength, over a wide range.

Evidence of reversal of pathology

Previous reports have described the natural history of the K3 [21,22] and APP/PS1 transgenic models [24,37]. Based on these previous reports and our own baseline data (Figure 1), significant brain pathology and functional deficits are present in both models at the ages when we commenced treatment. Our results therefore suggest that significant reversal of pathology has been induced by the NIr treatment. This has implications for clinical practice, where most patients are not diagnosed until pathogenic mechanisms have already been initiated and resultant neurologic symptoms manifest [15,27].

This evidence that AD-related neuropathology can be transient – appear then disappear – is not novel. Garcia-Alloza and colleagues described evidence of the transient deposition of A?, including the formation of plaque-like structures, in a transgenic model of A? deposition [24]. Reversal of such pathology, by interventions such as NIr treatment, may therefore be possible. However our results suggest that reversal may also be limited to recently formed, immature plaques, as we observed a significant NIr-induced reduction in immunolabelling with the 4G8 and 6E10 antibodies but no significant difference in Congo red staining. Because the 4G8 and 6E10 antibodies recognise various forms of A?, while Congo red stains only mature, compacted plaques, a reasonable deduction is that NIr treatment reduces only the transient, recently formed A? deposits, with no substantial effect on mature plaques. As there is still no consensus as to the pathogenic roles of different forms of A?, it is unclear how this might impact on the therapeutic potential of NIr in a clinical setting.

Mechanisms

The mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective actions of red to infrared light are not completely understood. There is considerable evidence that NIr photobiomodulation enhances mitochondrial function and ATP synthesis by activating photoacceptors such as COX and increasing electron transfer in the respiratory chain, while also reducing harmful reactive oxygen species [3840]. NIr photobiomodulation could also upregulate protective factors such as nerve growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor [41,42] and mesenchymal stem cells [43] that could target specific areas of degeneration.

The ability of NIr to reduce the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau, which in turn reduces oxidative stress [44], may be key to its neuroprotective effect. Oxidative stress and free radicals increase the severity of cerebrovascular lesions [45,46], mitochondrial dysfunction [4,47], oligomerisation of A? [5,48] and tauopathies and cell death [48,49] in AD. Considering the brain’s high consumption of oxygen and consequent susceptibility to oxidative stress, mitigating such stressors would probably have a pronounced protective effect [50].

 Conclusions

Overall, our results in two transgenic mouse models with existing AD-related pathology suggest that low-energy NIr treatment can reduce characteristic pathology, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in susceptible regions of the brain. These results, when taken together with those in other models of neurodegeneration, strengthen the notion that NIr is a viable neuroprotective treatment for a range of neurodegenerative conditions. We believe this growing body of work provides the impetus to begin trialling NIr treatment as a broad-based therapy for AD and other neurodegenerations.

 Abbreviations

A: Amyloid-beta; AD: Alzheimer’s disease; APP: Amyloid beta precursor protein gene; COX: Cytochrome c oxidase; 4-HNE: 4-hydroxynonenal; LED: Light-emitting diode; NFT: Neurofibrillary tangle; NIr: Near-infrared light; 8-OHDG: 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine; PS1: Presenilin 1; WT: Wildtype.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

 Authors’ contributions

SP undertook the bulk of the experimental work and analysis and wrote the manuscript. DMJ and JM were involved with the analysis of the data and the writing of the manuscript. CN was involved with genotyping and treating the animals. JS was involved in conceiving and designing the study and the writing of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Tenix Corporation, Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund and Bluesand Foundation for funding. They are grateful to Prof. Lars Ittner for providing the breeding litter for K369I mice, and to Dr Louise Cole and the Bosch Advanced Microscopy facility for the help with MetaMorph. Sharon Spana was splendid for her technical help. DMJ is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship.:

References

  • Hardy J, Selkoe DJ. The amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease: progress and problems on the road to therapeutics. Science. 2002;6:353–356. doi: 10.1126/science.1072994. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • Braak H, Braak E. Staging of Alzheimer’s disease-related neurofibrillary changes. Neurobiol Aging. 1995;6:271–278. doi: 10.1016/0197-4580(95)00021-6. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Nunomura A, Perry G, Aliev G, Hirai K, Takeda A, Balraj EK, Jones PK, Ghanbari H, Wataya T, Shimohama S, Chiba S, Atwood CS, Petersen RB, Smith MA. Oxidative damage is the earliest event in Alzheimer disease. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2001;6:759–767. [PubMed]
  • Yao J, Irwin RW, Zhao L, Nilsen J, Hamilton RT, Brinton RD. Mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit precedes Alzheimer’s pathology in female mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2009;6:14670–14675. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0903563106. [PMC free article][PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Stone J. What initiates the formation of senile plaques? The origin of Alzheimer-like dementias in capillary haemorrhages. Med Hypotheses. 2008;6:347–359. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.04.007. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Calabrese V, Guagliano E, Sapienza M, Panebianco M, Calafato S, Puleo E, Pennisi G, Mancuso C, Butterfield DA, Stella AG. Redox regulation of cellular stress response in aging and neurodegenerative disorders: role of vitagenes. Neurochem Res. 2007;6:757–773. doi: 10.1007/s11064-006-9203-y. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Whelan HT, Smits RL Jr, Buchman EV, Whelan NT, Turner SG, Margolis DA, Cevenini V, Stinson H, Ignatius R, Martin T, Martin T, Cwiklinski J, Philippi AF, Graf WR, Hodgson B, Gould L, Kane M, Chen G, Caviness J. Effect of NASA light-emitting diode irradiation on wound healing. J Clin Laser Med Surg. 2001;6:305–314. doi: 10.1089/104454701753342758.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Desmet KD, Paz DA, Corry JJ, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT, Henry MM, Buchmann EV, Connelly MP, Dovi JV, Liang HL, Henshel DS, Yeager RL, Millsap DS, Lim J, Gould LJ, Das R, Jett M, Hodgson BD, Margolis D, Whelan HT. Clinical and experimental applications of NIR-LED photobiomodulation. Photomed Laser Surg. 2006;6:121–128. doi: 10.1089/pho.2006.24.121.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT, VerHoeve J, Henry M, Buchman EV, Kane MP, Gould LJ, Das R, Jett M, Hodgson BD, Margolis D, Whelan HT. Mitochondrial signal transduction in accelerated wound and retinal healing by near-infrared light therapy. Mitochondrion. 2004;6:559–567. doi: 10.1016/j.mito.2004.07.033. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Natoli R, Zhu Y, Valter K, Bisti S, Eells J, Stone J. Gene and noncoding RNA regulation underlying photoreceptor protection: microarray study of dietary antioxidant saffron and photobiomodulation in rat retina. Mol Vis. 2010;6:1801–1822. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Xuan W, Vatansever F, Huang L, Wu Q, Xuan Y, Dai T, Ando T, Xu T, Huang YY, Hamblin MR. Transcranial low-level laser therapy improves neurological performance in traumatic brain injury in mice: effect of treatment repetition regimen. PLoS One. 2013;6:e53454. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053454. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Oron A, Oron U, Streeter J, de Taboada L, Alexandrovich A, Trembovler V, Shohami E. Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. J Neurotrauma. 2007;6:651–656. doi: 10.1089/neu.2006.0198. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Moro C, Torres N, El Massri N, Ratel D, Johnstone DM, Stone J, Mitrofanis J, Benabid AL. Photobiomodulation preserves behaviour and midbrain dopaminergic cells from MPTP toxicity: evidence from two mouse strains. BMC Neurosci. 2013;6:40. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-14-40.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Shaw VE, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J. Neuroprotection of midbrain dopaminergic cells in MPTP-treated mice after near-infrared light treatment. J Comp Neurol. 2010;6:25–40. doi: 10.1002/cne.22207. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Peoples C, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J. Photobiomodulation enhances nigral dopaminergic cell survival in a chronic MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2012;6:469–476. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2012.01.005. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Grillo SL, Duggett NA, Ennaceur A, Chazot PL. Non-invasive infra-red therapy (1072 nm) reduces beta-amyloid protein levels in the brain of an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model, TASTPM. J Photochem Photobiol B. 2013;6:13–22. [PubMed]
  • De Taboada L, Yu J, El-Amouri S, Gattoni-Celli S, Richieri S, McCarthy T, Streeter J, Kindy MS. Transcranial laser therapy attenuates amyloid-beta peptide neuropathology in amyloid-beta protein precursor transgenic mice. J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;6:521–535. [PubMed]
  • Lampl Y, Zivin JA, Fisher M, Lew R, Welin L, Dahlof B, Borenstein P, Andersson B, Perez J, Caparo C, Ilic S, Oron U. Infrared laser therapy for ischemic stroke: a new treatment strategy: results of the NeuroThera Effectiveness and Safety Trial-1 (NEST-1) Stroke. 2007;6:1843–1849. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.106.478230. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Schiffer F, Johnston AL, Ravichandran C, Polcari A, Teicher MH, Webb RH, Hamblin MR. Psychological benefits 2 and 4 weeks after a single treatment with near infrared light to the forehead: a pilot study of 10 patients with major depression and anxiety. Behav Brain Funct.2009;6:46. doi: 10.1186/1744-9081-5-46. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Tuby H, Hertzberg E, Maltz L, Oron U. Long-term safety of low-level laser therapy at different power densities and single or multiple applications to the bone marrow in mice. Photomed Laser Surg. 2013;6:269–273. doi: 10.1089/pho.2012.3395. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Ittner LM, Fath T, Ke YD, Bi M, van Eersel J, Li KM, Gunning P, Gotz J. Parkinsonism and impaired axonal transport in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2008;6:15997–16002. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0808084105. [PMC free article] [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • van Eersel J, Ke YD, Liu X, Delerue F, Kril JJ, Gotz J, Ittner LM. Sodium selenate mitigates tau pathology, neurodegeneration, and functional deficits in Alzheimer’s disease models. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2010;6:13888–13893. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1009038107. [PMC free article][PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Jankowsky JL, Fadale DJ, Anderson J, Xu GM, Gonzales V, Jenkins NA, Copeland NG, Lee MK, Younkin LH, Wagner SL, Younkin SG, Borchelt DR. Mutant presenilins specifically elevate the levels of the 42 residue beta-amyloid peptide in vivo: evidence for augmentation of a 42-specific gamma secretase. Hum Mol Genet. 2004;6:159–170. [PubMed]
  • Garcia-Alloza M, Robbins EM, Zhang-Nunes SX, Purcell SM, Betensky RA, Raju S, Prada C, Greenberg SM, Bacskai BJ, Frosch MP. Characterization of amyloid deposition in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Neurobiol Dis. 2006;6:516–524. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2006.08.017. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L. Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.J Biol Chem. 2007;6:36275–36282. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M703561200. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Truett GE, Heeger P, Mynatt RL, Truett AA, Walker JA, Warman ML. Preparation of PCR-quality mouse genomic DNA with hot sodium hydroxide and tris (HotSHOT) Biotechniques.2000;6:52–54. [PubMed]
  • Purushothuman S, Nandasena C, Johnstone DM, Stone J, Mitrofanis J. The impact of near-infrared light on dopaminergic cell survival in a transgenic mouse model of parkinsonism. Brain Res. 2013;6:61–70. [PubMed]
  • Purushothuman S, Marotte L, Stowe S, Johnstone DM, Stone J. The response of cerebral cortex to haemorrhagic damage: experimental evidence from a penetrating injury model. PLoS One.2013;6:e59740. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059740. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Wilcock DM, Gordon MN, Morgan D. Quantification of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and parenchymal amyloid plaques with Congo red histochemical stain. Nat Protoc. 2006;6:1591–1595. doi: 10.1038/nprot.2006.277. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Yan Q, Zhang J, Liu H, Babu-Khan S, Vassar R, Biere AL, Citron M, Landreth G. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy alters beta-amyloid processing and deposition in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. J Neurosci. 2003;6:7504–7509. [PubMed]
  • Augustinack JC, Schneider A, Mandelkow EM, Hyman BT. Specific tau phosphorylation sites correlate with severity of neuronal cytopathology in Alzheimer’s disease. Acta Neuropathol.2002;6:26–35. doi: 10.1007/s004010100423. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Bruck W, Bitsch A, Kolenda H, Bruck Y, Stiefel M, Lassmann H. Inflammatory central nervous system demyelination: correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with lesion pathology. Ann Neurol. 1997;6:783–793. doi: 10.1002/ana.410420515. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Sayre LM, Zelasko DA, Harris PL, Perry G, Salomon RG, Smith MA. 4-Hydroxynonenal-derived advanced lipid peroxidation end products are increased in Alzheimer’s disease. J Neurochem. 1997;6:2092–2097. [PubMed]
  • Mecocci P, MacGarvey U, Beal MF. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA is increased in Alzheimer’s disease. Ann Neurol. 1994;6:747–751. doi: 10.1002/ana.410360510. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • Trinchese F, Liu S, Battaglia F, Walter S, Mathews PM, Arancio O. Progressive age-related development of Alzheimer-like pathology in APP/PS1 mice. Ann Neurol. 2004;6:801–814. doi: 10.1002/ana.20101. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Oron A, Oron U, Chen J, Eilam A, Zhang C, Sadeh M, Lampl Y, Streeter J, DeTaboada L, Chopp M. Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to rats after induction of stroke significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits. Stroke. 2006;6:2620–2624. doi: 10.1161/01.STR.0000242775.14642.b8. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Blanchard V, Moussaoui S, Czech C, Touchet N, Bonici B, Planche M, Canton T, Jedidi I, Gohin M, Wirths O, Bayer TA, Langui D, Duyckaerts C, Tremp G, Pradier L. Time sequence of maturation of dystrophic neurites associated with A? deposits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exp Neurol. 2003;6:247–263. doi: 10.1016/S0014-4886(03)00252-8. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Karu T. Mitochondrial mechanisms of photobiomodulation in context of new data about multiple roles of ATP. Photomed Laser Surg. 2010;6:159–160. doi: 10.1089/pho.2010.2789.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Wilden L, Karthein R. Import of radiation phenomena of electrons and therapeutic low-level laser in regard to the mitochondrial energy transfer. J Clin Laser Med Surg. 1998;6:159–165.[PubMed]
  • Wong-Riley MT, Bai X, Buchmann E, Whelan HT. Light-emitting diode treatment reverses the effect of TTX on cytochrome oxidase in neurons. Neuroreport. 2001;6:3033–3037. doi: 10.1097/00001756-200110080-00011. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Hou JF, Zhang H, Yuan X, Li J, Wei YJ, Hu SS. In vitro effects of low-level laser irradiation for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: proliferation, growth factors secretion and myogenic differentiation. Lasers Surg Med. 2008;6:726–733. doi: 10.1002/lsm.20709. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • Tuby H, Maltz L, Oron U. Modulations of VEGF and iNOS in the rat heart by low level laser therapy are associated with cardioprotection and enhanced angiogenesis. Lasers Surg Med.2006;6:682–688. doi: 10.1002/lsm.20377. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Tuby H, Maltz L, Oron U. Induction of autologous mesenchymal stem cells in the bone marrow by low-level laser therapy has profound beneficial effects on the infarcted rat heart. Lasers Surg Med. 2011;6:401–409. doi: 10.1002/lsm.21063. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Stamer K, Vogel R, Thies E, Mandelkow E, Mandelkow EM. Tau blocks traffic of organelles, neurofilaments, and APP vesicles in neurons and enhances oxidative stress. J Cell Biol.2002;6:1051–1063. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200108057. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Aliev G, Smith MA, Seyidov D, Neal ML, Lamb BT, Nunomura A, Gasimov EK, Vinters HV, Perry G, LaManna JC, Friedland RP. The role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular lesions in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain Pathol. 2002;6:21–35. [PubMed]
  • Hamel E, Nicolakakis N, Aboulkassim T, Ongali B, Tong XK. Oxidative stress and cerebrovascular dysfunction in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. Exp Physiol. 2008;6:116–120. [PubMed]
  • Zhu X, Perry G, Moreira PI, Aliev G, Cash AD, Hirai K, Smith MA. Mitochondrial abnormalities and oxidative imbalance in Alzheimer disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006;6:147–153. [PubMed]
  • Zhang X, Le W. Pathological role of hypoxia in Alzheimer’s disease. Exp Neurol. 2010;6:299–303. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2009.07.033. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Wen Y, Yang S, Liu R, Brun-Zinkernagel AM, Koulen P, Simpkins JW. Transient cerebral ischemia induces aberrant neuronal cell cycle re-entry and Alzheimer’s disease-like tauopathy in female rats. J Biol Chem. 2004;6:22684–22692. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M311768200. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • Uttara B, Singh AV, Zamboni P, Mahajan RT. Oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases: a review of upstream and downstream antioxidant therapeutic options. Curr Neuropharmacol.2009;6:65–74. doi: 10.2174/157015909787602823. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
Rev Neurosci.  2013;24(2):205-26. doi: 10.1515/revneuro-2012-0086.

Red/near-infrared irradiation therapy for treatment of central nervous system injuries and disorders.

Fitzgerald M1, Hodgetts S, Van Den Heuvel C, Natoli R, Hart NS, Valter K, Harvey AR, Vink R, Provis J, Dunlop SA.
  • 1School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. lindy.fitzgerald@uwa.edu.au

Abstract

Irradiation in the red/near-infrared spectrum (R/NIR, 630-1000 nm) has been used to treat a wide range of clinical conditions, including disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), with several clinical trials currently underway for stroke and macular degeneration. However, R/NIR irradiation therapy (R/NIR-IT) has not been widely adopted in clinical practice for CNS injury or disease for a number of reasons, which include the following. The mechanism/s of action and implications of penetration have not been thoroughly addressed. The large range of treatment intensities, wavelengths and devices that have been assessed make comparisons difficult, and a consensus paradigm for treatment has not yet emerged. Furthermore, the lack of consistent positive outcomes in randomised controlled trials, perhaps due to sub-optimal treatment regimens, has contributed to scepticism. This review provides a balanced précis of outcomes described in the literature regarding treatment modalities and efficacy of R/NIR-IT for injury and disease in the CNS. We have addressed the important issues of specification of treatment parameters, penetration of R/NIR irradiation to CNS tissues and mechanism/s, and provided the necessary detail to demonstrate the potential of R/NIR-IT for the treatment of retinal degeneration, damage to white matter tracts of the CNS, stroke and Parkinson’s disease.

BMC Neurosci. 2013; 14: 40.
Published online Mar 27, 2013. doi:  10.1186/1471-2202-14-40
Cécile Moro,1 Napoleon Torres,1 Nabil El Massri,2 David Ratel,1 Daniel M Johnstone,3 Jonathan Stone,3 John Mitrofanis,corresponding author2 and Alim-Louis Benabid1
Author information ? Article notes ? Copyright and License information ?

Background

Parkinson’s disease is a major movement disorder characterised by the distinct signs of resting tremor, akinesia and/or lead pipe rigidity [1,2]. These arise after a substantial loss of dopaminergic cells, mainly within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of the midbrain [3,4]. The factors that generate this cell loss are not entirely clear, but there is evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction as a result of exposure to an environmental toxin (eg MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)) [5] and/or the presence of a defective gene [6].

Many previous studies have shown that some substances, such as anti-oxidants like CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10) [7] and melatonin [8], help neuroprotect dopaminergic cells in the SNc against degeneration in animal models of Parkinson’s disease. These substances are thought to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction by lessening the oxidative stress caused by free radicals generated by defective mitochondria present in Parkinson’s disease. In addition to these substances, recent studies have reported on the neuroprotective properties of low intensity light therapy, known also as photobiomodulation or near infra-red light (NIr) treatment, after parkinsonian insult. For example, NIr treatment protects neural cells in vitro against parkinsonian toxins such as MPTP and rotenone [9,10]. Further, we have shown that NIr treatment offers in vivo protection for dopaminergic cells in the SNc in an acute [11] and chronic [12] MPTP mouse (Balb/c) model. There is also a brief report indicating that NIr treatment improves the locomotor activity of mice after MPTP insult [13]. Although the mechanism of neuroprotection by NIr is not entirely clear, work on other systems indicate that NIr improves mitochondrial function and ATP synthesis in the damaged cells by increasing electron transfer in the respiratory chain and activating photoacceptors, such as cytochrome oxidase, within the mitochondria. Further, NIr has been shown to reduce the production of reactive oxygen species that are harmful to cells [14,15].

In this study, we sought to extend our earlier anatomical [11,12] and functional [16] studies by exploring the changes in locomotive behaviour of MPTP-treated mice after NIr treatment. Hitherto, this feature has not been reported extensively [13]. We undertook this behavioural analysis, together with a stereological account of SNc cell number, in two strains of mice, Balb/c (albino) and C57BL/6 (pigmented). This was done because there are reports that MPTP has differential effects on behaviour and dopamine levels in the basal ganglia in different strains of mice [17,18], as well as rats [19]. We wanted to determine whether there were mouse strain differences in the effect of NIr treatment after MPTP insult.

Methods

Subjects

Male BALB/c (albino; n=40) and C57BL/6 mice (pigmented; n=40) mice were housed on a 12 hr light/dark cycle with unlimited access to food and water. Animals were 8–10 weeks old. All experiments were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee of the University of Sydney and COMETH (Grenoble).

Experimental design

We set up four experimental groups (see Figure 1). Mice received intraperitoneal injections of either MPTP or saline, combined with simultaneous NIr treatments or not. The different groups were; (1) Saline: saline injections with no NIr (2) Saline-NIr: saline injections with NIr (3) MPTP: MPTP injections with no NIr (4) MPTP-NIr: MPTP injections with NIr. Each experimental group comprised ten mice of each strain.

Figure 1

Figure 1

Outline of the different experimental groups used in this study, namely Saline, Saline-NIr, MPTP, MPTP-NIr. The experimental time-line and behaviour time-points are shown. For the experimental time-line, there were two injections (saline or MPTP) and 

Following our previous work, we used an acute MPTP mouse model [11,16]. The acute model is a well-accepted model of the disease [20,21] and has revealed many aspects of the mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease over the years. Although it does not provide information on the chronic progressive nature of the disease, it does generate mitochondrial dysfunction, dopaminergic cell death and a reduction in locomotive activity [20,21]. The latter two issues were central in this study, making the acute model most appropriate for our use. Briefly, we made two MPTP (25 mg/kg injections; total of 50 mg/kg per mouse) or saline injections over a 24 hour period. Following each injection, mice in the MPTP-NIr and Saline-NIr groups were treated to one cycle of NIr (670 nm) of 90 seconds from a light-emitting device (LED; Quantum Devices WARP 10). This treatment equated to ~0.5 Joule/cm2 to the brain [11]. Approximately 6 hours after each injection and first NIr treatment, mice in these groups received a second NIr treatment, but no MPTP or saline injection. Hence, each mouse in these groups received four NIr treatments, equalling ~2 joules/cm2 reaching the brain. This NIr treatment regime was similar to that used by previous studies, in particular, those reporting changes after trans-cranial irradiation [11,12,1416]. For each treatment, the mouse was restrained by hand and the LED was held 1–2 cm above the head [11,12,16]. The LED generated no heat and reliable delivery of the radiation was achieved. For the Saline and MPTP groups, mice were held under the LED as described above, but the device was not turned on. After the last treatment, mice were allowed to survive for six days (Figure 1). This MPTP/NIr dose regime and survival period has been shown to furnish TH+ cell loss by MPTP and neuroprotection by NIr [8,11,16]. We also made some measurements of NIr penetration across the skin and fur of the two mouse strains. Skin was excised from the back of each mouse and positioned over a foil-coated vessel, with a calibrated light sensor at the bottom. NIr from the WARP-LED was then shone onto the skin and the penetration was recorded by the sensor (distance from WARP-LED to skin was ~4 cm and distance from skin to sensor was ~3 cm). For each strain, we compared the NIr penetration in cases where the fur was shaved from the skin to those that were unshaved. Each of the values obtained were compared to (and expressed as a percentage of) the values we recorded of NIr through the air, with no intervening skin.

Our experimental paradigm of simultaneous administration of parkinsonian insult and therapeutic application was similar to that of previous studies on animal models of Parkinson’s disease [8,11,12,16,2224]. This paradigm is unlike the clinical reality where there is cell loss prior to therapeutic intervention. However, in our experimental study we hoped to determine the maximum effect of NIr neuroprotection.

Immunocytochemistry and cell analysis

Following the survival period, mice were anaesthetised with an intraperitoneal injection of chloral hydrate (4%; 1 ml/100 g). They were then perfused transcardially with 4% buffered paraformaldehyde. The brains were removed and post-fixed overnight in the same solution. Next, brains were placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with the addition of 30% sucrose until the block sank. The midbrain was then sectioned coronally and serially (at 50 ?m) using a freezing microtome. All sections were collected in PBS and then immersed in a solution of 1% Triton (Sigma) and 10% normal goat serum (Sigma) at room temperature for ~1 hour. Sections were then incubated in anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (Sigma; 1:1000) for 48 hours (at 4°C), followed by biotinylated anti-rabbit IgG (Bioscientific; 1:200) for three hours (at room temperature) and then streptavidin-peroxidase complex (Bioscientific; 1:200) for two hours (at room temperature). To visualise the bound antibody, sections were reacted in a 3,3?– diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (Sigma) – PBS solution. Sections were mounted onto gelatinised slides, air dried overnight, dehydrated in ascending alcohols, cleared in Histoclear and coverslipped using DPX. Most of our immunostained sections were counterstained lightly with neutral red as well. In order to test the specificity of the primary antibody, some sections were processed as described above, except that there was no primary antibody used. These control sections were immunonegative.

In this study, we used TH immunocytochemistry to describe patterns of cell death and protection. As with many previous studies, we interpreted a change in TH+ cell number after experimental manipulation as an index of cell survival [8,11,12,22,23,25]. If cells lose TH expression, then they are likely to undergo death subsequently [25], which then leads to a reduction in Nissl-stained (and TH+) cell number [8,23]. Notwithstanding a small number of cells that may have transient loss of TH expression [26], a key aspect of our study was whether NIr treatment saved TH expression during a period when MPTP treatment alone would have abolished it [11,12]. In terms of analysis, the number of TH+ cells within the SNc was estimated using the optical fractionator method (StereoInvestigator, MBF Science), as outlined previously [8,11,12,23]. Briefly, systematic random sampling of sites – with an unbiased counting frame (100×100 ?m) – within defined boundaries of SNc was undertaken. Counts were made from every second section, and for consistency, the right hand side of the brain was counted in all cases. All cells (nucleated only) that came into focus within the frame were counted and at least five sites were sampled per section.

Digital images were constructed using Adobe Photoshop (brightness and contrast levels were adjusted on individual images in order to achieve consistency (eg, illumination) across the entire plate) and Microsoft PowerPoint programmes.

Behavioural analysis

During the experimental period, we performed a standard open-field test [17]. Mice were placed in white boxes (~20×20×20 cm) for C57BL/6 mice and black boxes for the Balb/c mice (this was important for software detection of contrast changes). Behavioural activity was measured and videotaped using a high definition camera (25000 images/sec) that detected changes in contrast and hence movement of mice. Mice were not acclimatised to the boxes prior to testing and boxes were cleaned thoroughly to avoid olfactory clues. Animal detection was made comparing a reference image that contained no subject with the live image containing the subject; the differences between the two were identified as subject pixel. Subject pixels changes were computed (Noldus, Ethovision, XT 8.5 version) to obtain different parameters of locomotor activity, for example velocity and mobility. Velocity was the mean speed of the mouse during trials (cm/sec) measured from the centre of gravity of the animal. To avoid “jittering”, a threshold of minimal distance moved of 0.3 cm was established. Mobility calculates the duration (in sec) during which the complete area detected as animal is changing even if the centre of gravity remains the same. High mobility refers to 10% or more of changes in percentage of body area detected between two samples, and immobility refers to less than 2% of changes. Each animal was tested at four time points (Figure 1); (T1) after first MPTP or saline injection and NIr (or no) treatment; (T2) after second NIr (or no) treatment; (T3) after second MPTP or saline injection and third NIr (or no) treatment; (T4) after fourth NIr (or no) treatment. Mice were tested for ~20 minutes at each time point. We tested locomotive activity at these points, particularly T1 and T3, because we wanted to explore the effects of NIr during a time when the MPTP was most effective (eg, immediately after injections), when the mice were most immobile and “sick” [17].

For comparisons between groups in the cell analysis, a one-way ANOVA test was performed, in conjunction with a Tukey-Kramer post-hoc multiple comparison test. For the behavioural analysis, groups were compared for time (T1,T2,T3,T4), drug (MPTP or not) and light (NIr or not) conditions using a three-way ANOVA test with a Bonferroni post-hoc test (using GraphPad Prism programme).

 Results

The results that follow will consider the cell and behavioural analyses for each strain separately.

Cell analysis

Figure 2 shows the estimated number of TH+ cells in the SNc of the four groups in the Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice. Overall, the variations in number were significant for both Balb/c (ANOVA: F=4.9; p<0.001) and C57BL/6 (ANOVA: F=3.8; p<0.01) mice. For the Saline and Saline-NIr groups of both strains, the number of TH+ cells was similar; no significant differences were evident between these groups (Tukey test: p>0.05). For the MPTP groups, TH+ cell number was reduced compared to the saline control groups in both strains (~30%). These reductions were significant (Tukey test: p<0.05). In the MPTP-NIr groups, TH+ cell number was higher than in the MPTP groups of both strains, but more so in the Balb/c (~30%) compared to the C57BL/6 (~20%) mice. This increase reached statistical significance for the Balb/c group (Tukey test: p<0.05) but not the C57BL/6 group. Unlike the MPTP groups, the number of TH+ cells in the MPTP-NIr groups of both strains was not significantly different to the saline groups (Tukey test: p>0.05).

Figure 2

Figure 2

Graph showing TH+ cell number in the SNc in the four experimental groups, in either the Balb/c (grey columns) or C57BL/6 (black columns) mice. Columns show the mean ± standard error of the total number (of one side) in each group. There were 
These patterns are illustrated further in Figure 3 for both Balb/c (Figure 3A,C,E,G) and C57BL/6 (Figure 3B,D,F,H) in each of the Saline (Figure 3A,B), Saline-NIr (Figure 3C,D), MPTP (Figure 3E,F) and MPTP-NIr (Figure 3G,H) groups. Similar patterns of immunostaining were seen in both strains. Although there were fewer TH+ somata in the MPTP group (Figure 3E,F), those remaining were similar in overall appearance to those seen in the Saline (Figure 3A,B), Saline-NIr (Figure 3C,D) and MPTP-NIr (Figure 3G,H) groups. They had round or oval-shaped somata with one to two labelled dendrites.

Figure 3

Figure 3

Photomicrographs of TH+ cells in the SNc of Balb/c (A,C,E,G) and C57BL/6 (B,D,F,H) in each of the Saline (A,B), Saline-NIr (C,D), MPTP (E,F) and MPTP-NIr (G,H) groups. Similar patterns of immunostaining were seen in both strains. There were fewer TH 

Behavioural analysis

Figure 4 shows recorded values of locomotor activity in Balb/c (Figure 4A,B,C) and C57BL/6 (Figure 4A’,B’,C’) mice, in terms of velocity (Figure 4A,A’), high mobility (Figure 4B,B’) and immobility (Figure 4C,C’). Overall, there were significant interactions for time and drug conditions for velocity, high mobility and immobility in both Balb/c (ANOVA: F range=7.5-13.6; p<0.05) and C57BL/6 (ANOVA: F range=16.8-40.5; p<0.05) mice, while significant interactions for time, drug and light conditions were evident for these locomotive activities in Balb/c (ANOVA: F range=11.7-24.2; p<0.05), but not in C57BL/6 (ANOVA: F range=0.4-0.8; p>0.05) mice.

Figure 4

Figure 4

Graphs showing the results of behavioural analysis of Balb/c (A,B,C) or C57BL/6 (A’,B’,C’) mice. The behaviouralanalysis included the locomotor activities of velocity (A,A’), high mobility (B,B’) and immobility 

The patterns of locomotor activity in the Saline and Saline-NIr groups were similar in both strains of mice. There was no significant effect of the light in the different time conditions (T1-T4) in the saline-treated cases (Bonferroni test: p>0.05). Hence, for clarity, the values of these groups were pooled and are represented as a dotted line across each of the graphs. By contrast, distinct changes in locomotor activity were evident between the MPTP and MPTP-NIr groups; their values are hence represented as individual columns at each time point (Figure 4). The results for each locomotor activity in the two strains will be considered separately below.

For Balb/c mice, at T1 (after first MPTP injection and NIr treatment) and T2 (after second NIr treatment) the locomotor activities in the MPTP and MPTP-NIr groups were similar. There were no significant effects of the light in these two time conditions in the MPTP-treated cases (Bonferroni test: p>0.05; Figure 4A,B,C). The effects of MPTP were immediate; compared to the saline control groups, both groups showed less velocity (Figure 4A) and high mobility (Figure 4B) and greater immobility (Figure 4C) at T1. By T2, there was considerable recovery of each locomotor activity in both MPTP and MPTP-NIr groups, with their values returning to control levels (Figure 4A,B,C). At T3 (after second MPTP injection and third NIr treatment) and T4 (after fourth NIr treatment), unlike at T1 and T2, there were significant effects of the light in the MPTP-treated cases (Bonferroni test: p<0.05; Figure 4A,B,C). At T3 and T4, the MPTP-NIr group had greater velocity (Figure 4A) and high mobility (Figure 4B) and less immobility (Figure 4C) than the MPTP group. Compared to the saline control groups, the MPTP-NIr group had similar locomotor activities at T3 and in particular, at T4 (Figure 4A,B,C). By contrast, the MPTP group at both T3 and T4, still had considerably less velocity (Figure 4A) and high mobility (Figure 4B) and greater immobility (Figure 4C) than the saline controls.

For C57BL/6 mice, there were distinct differences in locomotor activity compared to Balb/c mice. First, in C57BL/6 mice, there were no significant effects of the light at all time conditions (T1-T4) in the MPTP-treated cases (Bonferroni test: p>0.05; Figure 4A’,B’,C’); for Balb/c mice, there was no effect of the light in the MPTP-treated cases at T1 and T2 only (Figure 4A,B,C). Second, the MPTP and MPTP-NIr groups had considerably less velocity (Figure 4A’) and high mobility (Figure 4B’) and greater immobility (Figure 4C’) than the saline controls at the majority of the time points. In contrast to Balb/c mice, there was no evidence of NIr-specific recovery of function at T3 and T4; instead MPTP-treated mice appeared to have some recovery after the second MPTP injection (T4; Figure 4A’,B’,C’) irrespective of whether or not they received NIr treatment. Finally, control C57BL/6 mice showed lower baseline velocity (Figure 4A’) and high mobility (Figure 4B’), but also less immobility (Figure 4C’), than Balb/c mice.

In order to explore whether these behavioural (and cellular) differences between the two strains was due to pigmentation, we compared the degree of NIr penetration across the skin and fur in the different strains. In the Balb/c mice, we found that NIr penetration in the unshaved cases was 16% while in the shaved cases, it was 28%. In the C57BL/6 mice, NIr penetration was less, being 19% in the shaved cases and, quite remarkably, only 0.2% in the unshaved cases. Hence, these measurements indicated that the pigmented fur of the C57BL/6 mice absorbed almost all the NIr, hence limiting severely its penetration through to the brain.

 Discussion

We have two main findings. First, the MPTP-NIr group of Balb/c mice had greater locomotor activity and, as shown previously (Shaw et al. 2010), more surviving dopaminergic cells than the MPTP group. Second, these differences in cell survival and locomotor activity between the two groups were not as clear in C57BL/6 mice. Overall, our results indicated that Balb/c mice were a better model for exploring the neuroprotective effects of NIr after MPTP treatment than C57BL/6 mice.

Comparison with previous studies

This study offers the first detailed description of changes in locomotor activity in MPTP-treated mice after NIr treatment. Whelan and colleagues [13] described briefly that NIr pre-treatment, but not post-treatment, improved locomotor activity in an acute MPTP mouse model (strain was not mentioned in that report). Our results in Balb/c mice confirms, at least in part, the results of that study.

There have been several previous reports on the behavioural and cellular changes in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice after MPTP insult [17,18]. We confirm the findings of these reports in that there were fewer TH+ cells in the SNc of C57BL/6 mice than Balb/c mice (eg, saline controls) and that MPTP had a greater effect on locomotor activity in C57BL/6 than in Balb/c mice; further that Balb/c mice had some NIr-induced recovery of activity while C57BL/6 mice did not. Our results offered some differences to the previous studies, however. In particular, previous studies using non-stereological methods have reported a greater MPTP-induced cell loss in C57BL/6 compared to Balb/c mice [17,18]; our stereological analysis, by contrast, revealed a comparable loss in the two strains (~30%). The reason for these differences is not clear but they may reflect, for example, differences in our MPTP regimes (eg 50 mg/kg over 24 hrs vs. 60 mg/kg over 8 hrs) [17], methods of MPTP delivery (eg, intraperitoneal vs. intraventricular) [18] and methods of cell analysis (stereological vs. non-stereological) [17,18]. Finally, our control Balb/c mice had slightly better locomotor activity at baseline than the C57BL/6 mice, while Sedelis and colleagues [17] have reported the opposite. This discrepancy may reflect differences in the behavioural tests used and our measures of locomotor activity. For example, we measured velocity, high mobility and immobility using contrast changes, while the previous study recorded distance travelled with laser beam technology. Despite these differences in our studies, the key issue is that our MPTP regime was effective in generating TH+ cell loss and behavioural changes in the two strains, thereby allowing an assessment of neuroprotection by NIr treatment.

It should be noted that in this study, we did not undertake an analysis of the density of TH+ terminals in the striatum, nor of the locomotive activity of the mice after six days, the end of the experimental period. Previous studies have shown a complete recovery of TH+ terminal density in the striatum [18] and locomotive activity after six days in Balb/c mice using an acute model [19]; in C57BL/6 mice, although there are fewer TH+ terminals in the striatum of MPTP-treated animals compared to controls at this stage [18], the locomotive activity has been shown to return to control levels [19]. Hence, from these data, there would have been no point for us to explore these issues, mainly because any impact of NIr treatment – the central issue considered in the present study – would not have been elucidated.

NIr treatment improved locomotor activity after MPTP insult in Balb/c mice

Our results showed that NIr treatment improved locomotor activity after MPTP insult in Balb/c mice, hence confirming the histological findings that there were more dopaminergic cells in MPTP-NIr than in MPTP groups [11,12]. The beneficial effect of NIr treatment was not immediate. It was only after the second MPTP injection (and subsequent NIr treatments; T3 and T4) that a clear difference in locomotor activity was recorded between the MPTP-NIr and MPTP groups. Before then (T1 and T2), no differences were evident between these two groups (with the MPTP effect being similar and immediate in both groups). Hence, it appears that it takes several doses of NIr treatment to elicit a beneficial outcome. The mitochondria of the dopaminergic cells, after the third and fourth NIr treatment, may have been stimulated further to increase ATP synthesis and reduce the production of reactive oxygen species [14,15], thereby being better prepared to protect against the second MPTP insult. It is noteworthy that Whelan and colleagues [13] reported improvement of locomotor activity in MPTP-treated mice after several NIr pre-treatments, but not after a single post-treatment. Indeed, previous studies reporting beneficial results in the majority of systems have used multiple NIr treatments of ~4 J/cm2[14,15]. There may well be a therapeutic window for NIr treatment and this may vary for different animals and systems [15].

Strain differences in the effectiveness of NIr treatment after MPTP insult

Somewhat surprisingly, the beneficial effects of NIr treatment after MPTP insult were not as clear in the C57BL/6 mice. When compared to the Balb/c mice, the C57BL/6 mice had a smaller increase in dopaminergic cell number (20% vs 30%) and no clear improvement in locomotor activity in the MPTP-NIr compared to the MPTP group, at least over the later part of the survival period used in this study. Future studies may explore if there is a linear correlation between cell pathology and behavioural decline (and recovery) [28] in different strains of MPTP-treated mice after NIr treatment in the long-term; further, it would be of interest to examine if the finer details of motor disturbances in mice after MPTP treatment are improved after NIr treatment in the different mouse strains [29].

The reason for this strain difference was likely to be due to the pigmented fur of the C57BL/6 mice absorbing the majority of the NIr, preventing penetration into the brain. Our measurements indicated that in unshaved C57BL/6 mice, unlike in the shaved C57BL/6 and Balb/c (shaved and unshaved), there was very little NIr penetration (>1%). Melanin is certainly capable of absorbing the 670 nm wavelength [30] and that seemed sufficient to limit neuroprotection in the C57BL/6 mice. It is of course possible that, in addition to these penetration issues, the albino and pigmented strains have distinct cellular enzyme differences also, responsible for the different responses to NIr-induced metabolic (and therefore therapeutic) changes.

Conclusions

In summary, although our results are in an animal model of the disease, a key point is that NIr appeared to have neuroprotective effects on structures deep in the brain. Our findings that NIr treatment reduced MPTP-induced degeneration among midbrain dopaminergic cells and improved locomotor activity in Balb/c mice, due to greater NIr penetration through skin and fur, form templates for future endeavour. It remains to be determined if NIr, when applied from an external device, is able to penetrate the thicker skull and meningeal layers, together with the greater mass of brain parenchyma to reach the SNc of humans.

Abbreviations

CoQ10: Coenzyme Q10; ATP: Adenosine-5?-triphosphate; LED: Light emitting device; MPTP: 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine; NIr: Near-infrared light; PBS: Phosphate buffered saline; SNc: Substantia nigra pars compacta; SNr: Substantia nigra pars reticulata; TH: Tyrosine hydroxylase.

Competing interest

There was no conflict of interest for any of the authors: CM,NT, DR, DJ, JS, ALB and JM are full-time members of staff at their respective institutions, while CP and NEM are undergraduate students.

Authors’ contribution

All authors contributed to the analysis of the data and the writing of the manuscript. CM, NT, NEM, DR and JM contributed to the experimental work. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Acknowledgements

We are forever grateful to Tenix corp, Salteri family, Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund, Fondation Philanthropique Edmond J Safra, France Parkinson and the French National Research Agency (ANR Carnot Institute) for funding this work. We thank Sharon Spana, Vincente Di Calogero, Christophe Gaude, Caroline Meunier and Leti-DTBS staff for excellent technical assistance. We thank Sarah-Jane Leigh and Kevin Keay for their invaluable assistance with the statistics.

References

  • Blandini F, Nappi G, Tassorelli C, Martignoni E. Functional changes of the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson’s disease. Prog Neurobiol. 2000;14:63–88. [PubMed]
  • Bergman H, Deuschl G. Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease: from clinical neurology to basic neuroscience and back. Mov Disord. 2002;14:S28–S40. doi: 10.1002/mds.10140.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Rinne JO. Nigral degeneration in Parkinson’s disease. Mov Disord 8 Suppl. 1993;14:S31–S35.[PubMed]
  • McRitchie DA, Cartwright HR, Halliday GM. Specific A10 dopaminergic nuclei in the midbrain degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Exp Neurol. 1997;14:202–213. doi: 10.1006/exnr.1997.6418.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Langston JW. The etiology of Parkinson’s disease with emphasis on the MPTP story. Neurology.1996;14:S153–S160. doi: 10.1212/WNL.47.6_Suppl_3.153S. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Kruger R, Kuhn W, Muller T, Woitalla D, Graeber M, Kosel S, Przuntek H, Epplen JT, Schols L, Riess O. Ala30Pro mutation in the gene encoding alpha-synuclein in Parkinson’s disease. Nat Genet. 1998;14:106–118. doi: 10.1038/ng0298-106. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • LeWitt PA. Neuroprotection for Parkinson’s disease. J Neural Transm Suppl. 2006;14:113–122. doi: 10.1007/978-3-211-33328-0_13. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Ma J, Shaw VE, Mitrofanis J. Does melatonin help save dopaminergic cells in MPTP-treated mice? Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2009;14:307–314. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2008.07.008.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Liang HL, Whelan HT, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT. Near-infrared light via light-emitting diode treatment is therapeutic against rotenone- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity. Neurosci. 2008;14:963–974. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2008.03.042.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Ying R, Liang HL, Whelan HT, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT. Pretreatment with near-infrared light via light-emitting diode provides added benefit against rotenone – and MPP+– induced neurotoxicity. Brain Res. 2008;14:167–173. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Shaw VE, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J. Neuroprotection of midbrain dopaminergic cells in MPTP-treated mice after near-infrared light treatment. J Comp Neurol. 2010;14:25–40. [PubMed]
  • Peoples CL, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J. Photobiomodulation enhances nigral dopaminergic cell survival in a chronic MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2012;14:469–476. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2012.01.005. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Whelan HT, DeSmet KD, Buchmann E, Henry M, Wong-Riley M, Eells JT, Verhoeve J. Harnessing the cell’s own ability to repair and prevent neurodegenerative disease. SPIE Newsroom. 2008. pp. 1–3. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Desmet KD, Paz DA, Corry JJ, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT, Henry MM, Buchmann EV, Connelly MP, Dovi JV, Liang HL, Henshel DS, Yeager RL, Millsap DS, Lim J, Gould LJ, Das R, Jett M, Hodgson BD, Margolis D, Whelan HT. Clinical and experimental applications of NIR-LED photobiomodulation. Photomed Laser Surg. 2006;14:121–128. doi: 10.1089/pho.2006.24.121.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Hamblin MR, Demidova TN. In: Mechanisms for low-light therapy. Hamblin MR, Waynart RW, Anders J, editor. San Jose, CA, USA: Proc SPIE; 2006. Mechanisms of low level light therapy; p. 6140.
  • Shaw VE, Peoples CL, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J. Patterns of cell activity in the subthalamic region associated with the neuroprotective action of near-infrared light treatment in MPTP-treated mice. Parkinson’s disease. 2012.[PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Sedelis M, Hofele K, Auburger GW, Morgan S, Huston JP, Schwarting RKW. MPTP Susceptibility in the Mouse: Behavioural, Neurochemical, and Histological Analysis of Gender and Strain Differences. Behav Gen. 2000;14:171–182. doi: 10.1023/A:1001958023096.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Ito T, Suzuki K, Uchida K, Nakayama H. Different susceptibility to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridium (MPP+)-induced nigro-striatal dopaminergic cell loss between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice is not related to the difference of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) Exp Toxic Path. 2011. EPub.[PubMed]
  • Riachi NJ, Behmand RA, Harik SI. Correlation of MPTP neurotoxicity in vivo with oxidation of MPTP by the brain and blood–brain barrier in vitro in five rat strains. Brain Res. 1991;14:19–24. doi: 10.1016/0006-8993(91)90854-O. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Schober A. Classic toxin-induced animal models of Parkinson’s disease: 6OHDA and MPTP. Cell Tissue Res. 2004;14:215–24. doi: 10.1007/s00441-004-0938-y. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Bové J, Perier C. Neurotoxin-based models of Parkinson’s disease. Neurosci. 2012;14:51–76.[PubMed]
  • Piallat B, Benazzouz A, Benabid AL. Subthalamic nucleus lesion in rats prevents dopaminergic nigral neuron degeneration after striatal 6-OHDA injection: behavioural and immunohistochemical studies. Eur J Neurosci. 1996;14:1408–1414. doi: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.1996.tb01603.x. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Wallace BA, Ashkan K, Heise CE, Foote KD, Torres N, Mitrofanis J, Benabid AL. Survival of midbrain dopaminergic cells after lesion or deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated monkeys. Brain. 2007;14:2129–2145. doi: 10.1093/brain/awm137. [PubMed][Cross Ref]
  • Luquin N, Mitrofanis J. Does the cerebral cortex exacerbate dopamineric cell death in the substantia nigra of 6OHDA-lesioned rats? Parkinson Related Disord. 2008;14:213–223. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2007.08.010. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Björklund A, Rosenblad C, Winkler C, Kirik D. Studies on neuroprotective and regenerative effects of GDNF in a partial lesion model of Parkinson’s disease. Neurobiol Dis. 1997;14:186–200. doi: 10.1006/nbdi.1997.0151. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Huot P, Lévesque M, Parent A. The fate of striatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea. Brain. 2007;14:222–32. [PubMed]
  • Paxinos G, Franklin BJ. The mouse brain in stereotaxic coordinates. 2. San Diego, CA, USA: Academic Press California USA; 2001.
  • Bezard E, Dovero S, Bioulac B, Gross C. Effects of different schedules of MPTP administration on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice. Exp Neurol. 1997;14:288–292. doi: 10.1006/exnr.1997.6648. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  • Goldberg NR, Haack AK, Lim NS, Janson OK, Meshul CK. Dopaminergic and behavioural correlates of progressive lesioning of the nigrostriatal pathway with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Neurosci. 2011;14:256–271. [PubMed]
  • Meredith P, Powell BJ, Riesz J, Nighswander-Rempel S, Pederson MR, Moore E. Towards structure–property-function relationships for eumelanin. Soft Matter. 2006;14:37.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013; 2013: 594906.
Published online 2013 December 2. doi:  10.1155/2013/594906

Low-Level Laser Stimulation on Adipose-Tissue-Derived Stem Cell Treatments for Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

Chiung-Chyi Shen, 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 Yi-Chin Yang, 1 Ming-Tsang Chiao, 1 Shiuh-Chuan Chan, 5 and Bai-Shuan Liu 6 ,*
Author information  Article notes  Copyright and License information
Copyright © 2013 Chiung-Chyi Shen et al.
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of large-area irradiation from a low-level laser on the proliferation and differentiation of i-ADSCs in neuronal cells. MTT assays indicated no significant difference between the amount of cells with (LS+) and without (LS) laser treatment (P > 0.05). However, immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis results indicated a significant increase in the neural stem-cell marker, nestin, following exposure to low-level laser irradiation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, stem cell implantation was applied to treat rats suffering from stroke. At 28 days posttreatment, the motor functions of the rats treated using i-ADSCs (LS+) did not differ greatly from those in the sham group and HE-stained brain tissue samples exhibited near-complete recovery with nearly no brain tissue damage. However, the motor functions of the rats treated using i-ADSCs (LS?) remained somewhat dysfunctional and tissue displayed necrotic scarring and voids. The western blot analysis also revealed significant expression of oligo-2 in the rats treated using i-ADSCs (LS+) as well as in the sham group (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated that low-level laser irradiation exerts a positive effect on the differentiation of i-ADSCs and can be employed to treat rats suffering from ischemic stroke to regain motor functions.

1. Introduction

Stroke has become a common disease and has been shown to be associated with the consumption of high amounts of oil and salt. These dietary habits cause blood vessels to narrow and become prone to occlusion, which can lead to stroke. Strokes can be broadly classified into 2 categories: ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Differing treatment methods are used according to stroke type and lesion location. Therefore, at stroke onset, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used for diagnosis to provide physicians with a basis of treatment [1]. The treatment methods used for the 2 types of stroke are different. (1) Ischemic stroke is caused by thrombosis or blood clots in the brain vessels, which prevent blood flow into the brain tissues. Anticoagulants or antiplatelet medications must be administered to patients as soon as possible. (2) Hemorrhagic stroke is caused by the rupture or hemorrhaging of brain vessels caused by peripheral brain trauma (subarachnoid hemorrhage). The majority of cases of hemorrhagic stroke are caused by brain trauma (e.g., car and workplace accidents). Treating these patients often requires neurosurgical interventions [2]. Ischemic strokes constitute the majority of stroke cases. When patients suffer from ischemic stroke, the brain tissues necrotize gradually because of the lack of nutrients if anticoagulants or antiplatelet medications are not administered within 3 h of the stroke. After necrosis occurs, necrotic brain tissue cannot regenerate or recover its functions even if blood-vessel reperfusion occurs [3]. In recent years, stem cell treatment has become an innovative therapy for brain tissues that cannot regenerate.

Body fat extraction (e.g., abdomen, thigh, or buttock fat) has been used for body shaping procedures in the past, and the extracted fat was discarded as medical waste. Presently, medical experts have confirmed that adipose tissues contain large amounts of mesenchymal stem cells that exhibit in vitro proliferation and multiple differentiation ability, characteristics that facilitate the repair and regeneration of damaged tissues or organs [4]. In addition, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) possess several characteristics: (1) they can be easily harvested in abundant quantities without invasiveness, (2) they can proliferate in in vitro cultures, and (3) they can be applied to a wide range of body tissue types because these cells migrate to lesion sites automatically to repair damage. Studies have shown that ADSCs can differentiate into many different cell types, such as adipose, bone, cartilage, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, endothelial, blood, liver, and even neuronal cells [5]. Because of these characteristics, ADSCs will likely be one of the major sources of autologous stem cells in the future.

The effectiveness of laser therapy on biological bodies has been confirmed, and laser therapy has been successfully applied in new technological applications such as microsurgery. Lasers can be classified as high or low power, depending on the energy levels used. High-power lasers involve using high energy levels to provoke blood coagulation, stop bleeding, cut tissues, and even damage cells, whereas low-level lasers involve using electromagnetic or photochemical processes to achieve therapeutic effects [6]. A low-level laser is defined as a laser with extremely low power and energy too low to destroy the molecular bonding capacity (e.g., hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces) of tissues. Therefore, low-level lasers do not cause molecular structural change, protein denaturation, or cell death. Irradiation from low-level lasers on tissue does not cause an obvious temperature increase at the treatment site (less than 0.1 to 0.5°C); thus, any physiological responses of the tissues are produced by the stimulation of the laser itself, and this mechanism is described by the theory of laser biostimulation [7]. In addition, by using an appropriate energy level, low-level lasers are primarily used to stimulate biological cells to induce or strengthen physiological responses for facilitating local blood circulation, regulating cell functions, promoting immunological functions, and facilitating cell metabolism and proliferation. Using lasers to generate these physiological changes enables treatment goals such as anti-inflammation and wound-healing promotion to be met [89]. Many studies have shown that low-level laser irradiation exerts beneficial biological effects on bone, neuronal, and skin healing [1012]. However, the type, wavelength, power, and energy level of lasers used in previous studies have varied, and various effects have been observed in different cells when differing levels of laser energy were applied. Previous studies have shown that using a low-level laser with an 820–830 nm wavelength can reduce neural damage, facilitate neuronal healing, and accelerate neural recovery after an osteotomy [1314]. Using a low-level laser with a 660 nm wavelength has been demonstrated to exert healing effects on musculoskeletal injuries and inflammation [15]. In addition, many studies have indicated that a low-level laser with a 660 nm wavelength can effectively promote neural regeneration and accelerate the reinnervation of muscle fibers to promote the recovery of motor functions [1618]. Recent evidence has suggested that protein aggregates such as ?-amyloid- (A?) associated neurotoxicity and dendrite atrophy might be a consequence of brain-derived neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) deficiency. Meng et al. observed that the upregulation of BDNF caused by using low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway can ameliorate A?-induced neuron loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway through which LLLT protects against A?-induced neurotoxicity [19].

Currently, most low-level laser therapies in practical clinical applications emphasize treatment courses covering an extensive tissue area in a relatively short period. Multichannel-laser hair treatment, which is currently available for the physical treatment of alopecia, is one such example. Therefore, we used a large-area LLLT that differs from the irradiation methods previously reported in the literature (such as single-spot low-energy laser exposure or the scanning method) to increase the local area of exposure [18]. In this study, stem cells were extracted from adipose tissues, and neural-stem-cell- (NSC-) differentiating agents were used to culture these ADSCs to transform them into induced adipose-derived stem cells (i-ADSCs), which were used as experimental cells. First, we investigated the effects of large-area irradiation from a low-level laser on the proliferation and differentiation of i-ADSCs into neuronal cells. We then investigated whether i-ADSCs treated with laser irradiation and injected via an intravenous route could integrate and survive in various locations in rat brains. We investigated if this treatment could improve the neurological dysfunctions caused by ischemic brain damage in rats and if rats could produce BDNF, using this treatment. Studies using intravenous injection to transplant i-ADSC for the treatment of ischemic stroke with protocols similar to that used in the current study are rare. In this study, we further combined the biostimulation theory from large-area LLLT with transplantation of i-ADSCs to induce neural differentiation to investigate the effectiveness of ischemic stroke treatment. In a previous study [20], we established a transient ischemia-reperfusion stroke rodent model by using right-sided middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to simulate acute clinical insults. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by comparing HE-staining and western blot analysis, as well as the evaluation of motor skill indices by using the rotarod and grip-strength tests. Our protocol has the potential to be developed for application in the clinical treatment of patients with ischemic stroke.

2. Materials and Methods

2.1. Isolation and Culture of ADSCs

A flowchart illustrating the experimental design of the study is shown in Figure 1. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used for isolating rat ADSCs. The ADSCs were harvested from the rats’ subcutaneous anterior abdominal wall. Inguinal fat pads were excised, washed sequentially in serial dilutions of betadine, and finely minced as tissues in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The tissues were digested with 0.3% of Type I collagenase (Sigma) at 37°C for 60 min. The digested tissue/cell suspension was filtered through a 100-mesh filter to remove the debris, and the filtrate was centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 10 min. The cellular pellet was resuspended using DMEM/F12 (10% FBS, 1% P/S) and then cultured for 24 h at 37°C in 5% CO2. Unattached cells and debris were then removed and the adherent cells were cultured using fresh medium. The cells were cultured to 80% confluency before being released with 0.05% trypsin and then subcultured.

Figure 1

A flowchart illustrating the experimental design. Detailed procedures are described in Section 2.

2.2. ADSC Neuronal Predifferentiation

In this study, i-ADSCs obtained from culturing ADSCs by adding NSC-differentiating agents were used as experimental cells. ADSCs within 3–5 passages were detached and induced using NSC media supplementation. ADSCs were resuspended in a serum-free DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with an N2 supplement (Sigma), 20 ng/mL of epidermal growth factor (Gibco, NY, USA), and fibroblast growth factor (Gibco, NY, USA).

2.3. Setup of a Low-Level Laser Application Method

The probe of the laser irradiation device was fixed vertically on a clean, open experimental bench. The distance between the probe and the cell culture dish was 30 cm. Laser irradiation was applied in a 25°C environment by using an AlGaInP-diode laser (Konftec Co., Taipei, Taiwan) with a wavelength of 660 nm at an output power of 50 mW and frequency of 50 Hz. In the control group, the cells that did not receive laser irradiation treatment, i-ADSCs (LS) (n = 10), were compared with the experimental cells, i-ADSCs (LS+) (n = 10), which were subjected to a laser irradiation treatment of 10 min. The cells in the i-ADSCs (LS) group were cultured for 7 days, whereas the cells in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group were treated using low-level lasers on the following day for 10 min and then cultured for 6 days. The cells receiving laser irradiation were collected at various times for analysis according to the purposes of the experimental protocols. After the completion of the cultures, an optical microscope was used for observing cell morphology.

2.4. MTT Assay

The principle of the MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1]-2,4-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay is that the mitochondria of living cells can transform the yellow chemical substance MTT tetrazolium into the purple non-water-soluble substance MTT formazan through the effect of succinate dehydrogenase. DMSO can be used to dissolve the purple-colored products. No such response occurs in dead cells. An optical absorbance of 570 nm was measured using an enzyme immunoassay analyzer. A higher absorbance value indicates a larger amount of cells. In this study, ADSCs neuronal predifferentiation was first distributed in a 96-well plate with approximately 10000 cells per well. The cells in the i-ADSCs (LS) group were then cultured in a 37°C environment and a 5% CO2 environment for 5 days and 7 days, respectively. The cells in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group were cultured in a 37°C environment and a 5% CO2 environment for 4 days and 6 days, respectively. After the completion of the cultures, the medium was removed by several rinses with PBS. An MTT solution of 100 ?L was added to each well of a 96-well plate in the dark (1 mL of MTT reagent was added to 9 mL of phenol-red-free, serum-free medium) and incubated in a 37°C, 5% CO2 environment for 2 h. The MTT solution was then removed and the cells were dissolved using DMSO. An optical absorbance of 570 nm was measured using an enzyme immunoassay analyzer to compare the values between the different groups.

2.5. Immunocytochemistry of i-ADSCs

After 7 days in culture, the subcultured neurospheres were washed using 0.1 M PBS 3 times and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for 1 h. Following the fixation, the cells were permeated with 0.1% of Triton X-100 for 10 min and then blocked with 5% nonfat milk for 30 min. The phenotypic expression of these neurospheres was examined by implementing immunocytochemical staining accompanied by antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic proteins (GFAPs) for astrocytes, mouse monoclonal antinestins for NSCs, and doublecortin (DCX), which has recently been used as a marker for neurogenesis. Briefly, the fixed cells were washed 3 times in cold PBS. After washing with PBS, the aforementioned primary antibodies were added and the slides were maintained at room temperature overnight. In the following day, the primary antibodies were removed by washing 3 times with PBS and the secondary antibodies were added before incubating the cells for 1 h. After washing off the secondary antibodies, the cells were incubated with tertiary antibodies tagged with peroxidase-antiperoxidase for 1 h. The tertiary antibodies were washed off using PBS. The cells were incubated with DAPI (Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA) diluted with the cell culture medium for 10 min. Finally, the cells were mounted with 90% glycerol and examined using fluorescent microscopy (Olympus IX-71, Inc., Trenton, NJ, USA).

2.6. Animals and Induction of the MCAO Model

In a previous study [20], we established a transient ischemia-reperfusion stroke rodent model, using right-sided middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to simulate acute clinical insults. All of the experimental procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Taichung Veteran General Hospital, Taiwan. Thirty-two adult male SD rats were randomly allocated to 3 groups: the i-ADSCs (LS) therapy group (n = 12), the i-ADSCs (LS+) therapy group (n = 12), and a sham group (n = 8). The rats in all 3 groups were euthanized on the 28th day after MCAO was performed. For MCAO procedures, anesthesia was induced using 4% isoflurane (Baxter, USA) and maintained using 2% isoflurane. A midline cervical incision was made to isolate the right bilateral common carotid artery. A 25 mm-long 3-0 nylon surgical thread was then inserted into the right carotid bifurcation. In this study, 2 rounds were used to provide a more complete blockage of blood flow in the artery. When the blunted distal end met resistance, the proximal end of the thread was tightened at the carotid bifurcation. The right common, internal, and external carotid arteries were carefully separated from the adjacent vagal nerve, and the distal portions of the external and common carotid arteries were ligated. A small incision was subsequently made at the proximal portion of the external carotid artery, and a 3-0 nylon monofilament suture was gently inserted (approximately 18 mm) into the internal carotid artery. After 60 min of MCAO, the nylon surgical thread was removed to allow complete reperfusion of the ischemic area. During ischemia, rectal temperature was monitored and maintained at approximately 37°C by using a heating pad and an overhead lamp. The anesthetized rats intravenously received i-ADSCs at a concentration of 2 × 107 mL 1 via their femoral veins. The rats in the sham group underwent the same surgical procedures except that the right-sided middle cerebral artery was not occluded.

2.7. Rotarod Test

An accelerating rotarod test was performed for each rat before and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was induced. Before the ischemia-reperfusion experiment was conducted, the animals were subjected to 3 training sessions per day for 3 days on the accelerating rotarod to obtain stable duration on the rotarod spindle. The diameter of the rotarod spindle was 7 cm. The surface of the rotarod spindle was made of knurled Perspex to provide an adequate grip, which prevented animals from slipping off the spindle. The speed of the spindle was increased from 4 to 40 rpm over a period of 5 min and the duration that the animal stayed on the device was recorded. The rats that were capable of staying on the rotarod longer than 150 s after 3 training sessions were selected for the experiments. On the testing days, the animals were tested twice, and the longest durations on the rotarod were recorded.

2.8. Grip Strength Test

Each rat was supported in a horizontal position approximately parallel to a grip bar (Model DPS-5R: range 0–5 kgf, Japan). The researcher set the rat’s forepaws on the grip bar and pulled the animal horizontally away from the bar by the base of its tail until the rat released its grip. The pulling motion was smooth and continuous. The researcher supported the rat by the abdomen when the grip was released. The reading on the strain gauge remained constant at the point of maximal value, which was recorded as the measure of forepaw grip strength. The researcher supported the rat body by both the chest and the base of the tail at an angle of ?45° down the tail. The rat was facing away from the grip bar. The rat was encouraged to grasp the bar by moving its hind paw to the bar. When the rat grasped the bar with both hind paws, establishing a “full” grip, the upper body of the rat was lowered so that the rat was in a nearly horizontal position. The rat was pulled horizontally by the base of the tail until it released its grip and was supported as previously described. The reading on the strain gauge remained constant at the point of maximal value (force was measured in grams), which was recorded as the measurement of forepaw grip strength. Three values were obtained in succession, and the median value was used as the daily score. The data were expressed as the percentage of the baseline (preischemic) value.

2.9. Hematoxylin-Eosin Staining of the Cerebellum

The SD rats were anesthetized using 10% chloral hydrate (4 ?L/kg), administered intraperitoneally, and were euthanized on the 28th day after the MCAO operation and sham treatment. For each rat, the left cerebellum was rapidly removed and postfixed in formalin for 24 h. The postfixed tissues were embedded in paraffin wax and 6-?m-thick serial coronal sections were obtained and mounted on poly-L-lysine-coated glass slices. To assess the histological changes in the MCAO and sham groups, the paraffin-embedded left cerebellum sections were stained using hematoxylin-eosin (HE), according to standard protocol before the assay was performed.

2.10. Western Blot Analysis

Proteins were extracted from the rat brains by using a cold lysis buffer (10 mM of tetra sodium pyrophosphate, 20 mM of Hepes, 1% Triton X-100, 100 mM NaCl, 2 ?g/mL of aprotinin, 2 ?g/mL of leupeptin, and 100 ?g/mL of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride). The protein concentrations from tissue extracts or ADSC-conditioned medium were determined using the Bradford protein assay. Equal amounts of protein were placed in a 2× sample buffer (0.125 M Tris-HCl, pH 6.8, 2% glycerol, 0.2 mg/mL of bromophenol blue dye, 2% SDS, and 10% ?-mercaptoethanol) and electrophoresed through 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gel. The proteins were then transferred onto a nitrocellulose membrane by using electroblotting. The membranes were blocked for 1 h at room temperature in a Tris-buffered saline with Tween-20 (TBST) and 5% nonfat milk. The primary antibodies (1 : 1000) with appropriate dilutions were incubated for 1 h at room temperature in TBST and 5% nonfat milk. The blots were then washed and incubated with a peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody (1 : 2000) for 1 h in TBST. The chemiluminescent substrate for the secondary antibody was developed using the ECL detection system (Amersham, UK). The blots were exposed to film for 3–5 min and then developed.

2.11. Statistical Analysis

The data were expressed as the mean value ± standard error of the mean. The statistical significance of the differences between the groups was determined using a one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s test. An alpha level of less than 0.05 (P < 0.05) was considered statistically significant.

3. Results

3.1. Effects of the Low-Level Laser on Cell Morphology

The ADSCs were passaged 3–5 times after the initial plating of the primary culture. Rat ADSCs appeared to be a monolayer of large and flat cells (Figure 2(a)). Many cells in the i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups induced a neuronal phenotype and exhibited, among one another, bipolar and multipolar elongations of neuronally induced cell-forming networks. The results show that the stem cells in both i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups developed tentacles, indicating that ADSCs were facilitating the induction of differentiation into neuronal cells. Comparative optical micrographs revealed that some attached cells exhibited a spread-out shape with a spindle-like and fibroblastic phenotype in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group (Figure 2(b)). However, most of i-ADSCs-expressing neurites extended radially, connecting like bridges with those from adjacent cells in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group (Figure 2(c)).

Figure 2

The morphology of inductions of adipose-derived stem cell (i-ADSC) differentiation into neuronal cells after low-level laser irradiation. (a) Undifferentiated ADSCs; (b) i-ADSCs (LS?); (c) i-ADSCs (LS+). The arrow denotes the neuronal-like cells. 

3.2. Effects of the Low-Level Laser on Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

In this study, MTT assays were performed on Day 5 and Day 7 to evaluate the effects of large-area low-level laser irradiation on the facilitation of cell proliferation. After analyzing the optical absorbance values, the results showed that, on Day 5, cell activity was slightly higher in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group compared with that in the i-ADSCs (LS) group. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). On Day 7, the cell amounts in both the i-ADSCs (LS+) and i-ADSCs (LS?) groups were larger than the amounts on Day 5. However, the cell proliferation rates were similar on Day 5 without major differences (P > 0.05) (Figure 3).

Figure 3

The cell activity of inductions of adipose-derived stem cell (i-ADSC) differentiation into neuronal cells in both the i-ADSCs (LS) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups on Days 5 and 7 after culture.

In this study, immunofluorescent staining and western blots were used to evaluate the effects of large-area low-level laser irradiation on the facilitation of cell differentiation. Immunofluorescent staining was performed for the NSC marker, nestin, glial cell marker, GFAP antibody, and neuronal precursor-cell-marker protein, DCX. After the staining was completed, fluorescent microscopy was used to observe the amount of fluorescence expression of each antibody. The results showed that the fluorescence expression of the nestin was higher in the cells in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than that in the cells in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. These results indicated that ADSC differentiation into neuronal cells was facilitated after large-area low-level laser irradiation (Figure 4(a)). For GFAP, no difference was observed in the amount of fluorescence expression of GFAP between the i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups (Figure 4(b)). Furthermore, for DCX, no difference was observed between the 2 groups because the cells in both groups still exhibited stem cell morphology (Figure 4(c)).

Figure 4

The immunofluorescent staining for (a) nestin; (b) GFAP; and (c) DCX of inductions of adipose-derived stem cell (i-ADSC) differentiation into neuronal cells in both the i-ADSCs (LS?) (left) and i-ADSCs (LS+) (right) groups. The scale bar represents 

Western blot is used to quantify the expression of marker proteins. Therefore, western blot analysis was used to compare the amount of nestin expression between the i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups in this study. The results showed that cells in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group exhibited a substantially higher nestin expression compared with the cells in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group (P < 0.05) (Figure 5). Regarding the results of GFAP and DCX, no difference was observed in the fluorescence expressions of the i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups. Therefore, western blot analyses were not shown for GFAP and DCX. This result is consistent with the findings obtained using immunofluorescent staining.

Figure 5

The cell growth of inductions of adipose-derived stem cell (i-ADSC) differentiation into neuronal cells with or without laser irradiation. (a) The amount of nestin expression. (b) The figure showing the quantification. GAPDH served as the internal reference.

3.3. Evaluation of Behavior Recovery after Stroke in the Animals

In this study, treadmill and forepaw-grip tests were used to evaluate motor function recovery after stem-cell transplantation treatment in rats with ischemic stroke. The treadmill test was performed on Day 7 after stem-cell transplantation was performed on the rats with stroke. The rats from either the i-ADSCs (LS+) group or the i-ADSCs (LS) group were unable to run as quickly as the rats in the sham group. From Day 14, the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group gradually recovered the ability to run. By contrast, it was observed that the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group recovered slightly; however, the degree of recovery was lower than that in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group. On Day 21 after stem-cell transplantation, the recovery of running function was still more satisfactory in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than in the i-ADSCs (LS) group. On Day 28, the motor function of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group was approaching the level of the rats in the sham group, whereas the performance of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group was still considerably weaker than that of the sham group (Figure 6).

Figure 6

The treadmill test for evaluating the recovery of the motor function of running in rats with ischemic stroke with i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) transplantation.

Grip-strength tests were performed on Day 7 after stem-cell transplantation. The findings were similar to the treadmill test results; the grip behavior of the rats in both the i-ADSCs (LS+) group and the i-ADSCs (LS) group was worse than that of the rats in the sham group. On Day 14, the grip strength of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group was considerably recovered. By contrast, although the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS) group showed some progress, the improvement was minimal. On Day 21, the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group continued to recover, whereas it was observed that the animals in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group were not recovering as quickly. On Day 28, grip strength recovery in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group approached that of the sham group, whereas grip strength in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group was still lower (Figure 7).

Figure 7

The grip test for evaluating the recovery of grip strength in rats with ischemic stroke treated with i-ADSCs (LS) and i-ADSCs (LS+) transplantation.

 

3.4. Repair of Brain Tissues after Treatment in Animals

After euthanizing the rats, the brain specimens were treated with paraffin and then sliced. The HE-immunostaining method was used to observe the repair of brain tissues after stem-cell transplantation was performed. An upright microscope (10x) was used to macroscopically observe the brain tissue, and the results showed that brain tissue was completely repaired in the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group with nearly no necrotic brain tissue. By contrast, obvious necrotic scars were observed at the ischemic sites of the brain tissue from the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group (Figure 8(a)). Observed under a microscope and magnified 200 times, the results showed that the brain tissue from the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group was as dense as normal brain tissues, whereas numerous cavities were observed in the brain tissue from rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group (Figure 8(b)).

Figure 8

The observation of brain tissue necrosis in rats with ischemic stroke treated with i-ADSCs (LS) (left) and i-ADSCs (LS+) (right) transplantation: (a) 10x; (b) 200x.

Oligodendrocytes, which are glial cells found in normal brains, form myelin in the central nervous system. Oligodendrocytes substantially decrease after brain cells are damaged, leading to myelin collapse and the loss of neural-signal conduction. Therefore, a western blot was used to analyze the amount of expression of the oligodendrocyte cell protein, oligo-2, to confirm the repair of brain tissues after stem-cell transplantation was performed in rats with stroke. The results showed that the amount of oligo-2 protein response in the brain tissues of the i-ADSCs (LS+) group was as high as that in the sham group. By contrast, the oligo-2 protein response in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group was substantially lower (P < 0.05). These results indicated that stem-cell transplantation treatments can repair brain tissues damaged by ischemia (Figure 9).

Figure 9

The observation of brain tissue repair in rats with ischemic stroke treated with i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) transplantation. (a) The amount oligo-2 expression. (b) Quantification. GAPDH served as the internal reference. *Significance (P < 

4. Discussion

Stem cells possess the ability to proliferate, regenerate, differentiate, and secrete cytokines. Previous studies have proven that stem-cell therapy substantially improves the damage caused by stroke. Stem cells are derived from various sites. Most previous studies have used bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells; however, we used adipose stem cells in the present study, which are easily accessible, and abundant and exhibit high differentiation and proliferation activity. Moreover, adipose stem cells do not trigger strong immune reactions (resulting in low exclusion) and rarely form teratomas. In the literature, it has been demonstrated that adipose stem cells are essential adult stem cells that differentiate into various mesoderm tissues similarly to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells [2123]. Furthermore, adipose stem cells are more easily accessible than mesenchymal stem cells; therefore, adipose stem cells can be used as a substitute for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repairing damaged tissues in the future. Adipose stem cells are generally more practical than bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for use in research [2326].

In this study, we used large-area low-level laser irradiation to induce ADSCs to differentiate into neuronal cells. The MTT assay analysis showed that the cell activity of the i-ADSCs increased on Days 5 and 7 of culture after large-area low-level laser irradiation [2728]. However, although cell activity increased on both Days 5 and 7, the activity was also increased for the group that did not receive laser irradiation treatment. No significant difference was observed between the groups with or without laser treatment (P > 0.05). Previous studies have shown that, depending on irradiation parameters, various types of cell respond differently to laser irradiation [29]. Although the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains obscure, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanism of laser action [30]. We speculate that the lack of significant effects might be attributable to the short duration of low-level laser irradiation, which might not provide sufficient energy to the ADSCs for them to facilitate proliferation. Alternatively, using low-level lasers on the ADSCs might not sufficiently enhance cell proliferation. Therefore, future studies should investigate the appropriate duration of low-level laser irradiation and determine how much energy is required to accelerate cell proliferation [31,32].

To understand if using large-area low-level lasers exerted a positive effect on cell differentiation, we used immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis to evaluate whether these lasers were capable of accelerating the induction of cell differentiation [33]. The immunofluorescent staining results showed that the nestin level in the group with i-ADSCs treated using large-area low-level laser irradiation increased substantially compared with that of the group that did not receive laser treatment. This result indicated that large-area low-level laser can accelerate the differentiation of ADSCs into neuronal cells [3435]. LLLT has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have reported that laser treatments accelerated nerve cell sprouting and cell migration, which begin within 24 h of seeding. During the first week of cultivation, irradiated cultures contain a high number of neurons exhibiting large perikaria and branched neuronal fibers, which interconnect to form networks [36]. The possible mechanism of LLLT at the cellular level has been attributed to the acceleration of electron transfer reactions, resulting in the increase of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+as versatile second messengers [37]. Previous studies have shown that applying LLLT could influence cellular processes by altering DNA synthesis and protein expression [38], biomodulating cytoskeletal organization [39], and stimulating cellular proliferation [38]. Such properties suggest that LLLT, or interventions with similar neurobiological effects, can be used to treat neurodegeneration, a phenomenon that underlies debilitating clinical conditions.

However, no obvious differences were observed for GFAP and DCX in the test results. This can be explained by the differentiation agent used in this study, which exerts its effects primarily by inducing ADSCs to differentiate into NSCs. Therefore, although the ADSCs were treated using a low-level laser, they still did not differentiate into neural glia cells. The DCX protein can only be discovered after neurons have been formed from NSCs, which demonstrates that DCX is a late-stage protein that cannot be expressed when cells still exhibit the morphology of NSCs. Therefore, the amount of DCX expression is not affected by low-level laser exposure. Western blot analysis was used to determine the amount of nestin expression after i-ADSCs were exposed to large-area low-level laser irradiation and culture for 7 days. The results showed that the amount of nestin was higher with laser treatment. This is similar to the findings from the immunofluorescent-staining method, indicating that laser irradiation can accelerate the differentiation of ADSCs into neuronal cells. These results indicated that ADSCs can be induced to differentiate into neuronal cells after treatment by large-area laser irradiation for 10 min. Future studies should establish the precise duration of large-area LLLT required to achieve improved results.

In this study, treadmill and forepaws grip tests were used to evaluate motor function recovery after stem cell transplantation treatments in rats with stroke. The treadmill test results showed that the running function was weaker for the rats in the sham group on Day 7 after treatment. We speculate that this might have been because the brain-tissue lesion area from ischemia was too large; therefore, the transplanted stem cells did not have sufficient time to noticeably repair brain tissue. Therefore, the motor functions of the rats remained impaired on Day 7. When tested on Day 14, recoveries in motor functions were observed in both the i-ADSCs (LS?) and i-ADSCs (LS+) groups, with superior recovery in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group, indicating that the damaged brain tissue was repaired. On Day 21, the recovery of the rats’ running function was more satisfactory in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group, indicating that the brain tissue repair capability was superior to that in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group. When tested on Day 28, the running function of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group was close to that of the rats in the sham group. However, the motor function of the i-ADSCs (LS?) group remained impaired, indicating that hind-paw motor function recovery was accelerated after i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment.

The grip test results were similar to the treadmill test results. On Day 7 after stem-cell transplantation treatment of the rats with stroke, grip strength was low for both the i-ADSCs (LS+) group and i-ADSCs (LS?) groups because the damaged brain tissues were just about to be repaired; therefore, the forepaws of the rats remained weak. When tested on Day 14, no major improvement was observed in the grip strength of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. By contrast, the grip strength improved considerably in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group, indicating that the brain tissue repair capability was more satisfactory in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. On Days 21 and 28, the tests showed that grip strength recovery was more satisfactory in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. On Day 28, the grip strength in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group recovered to a level close to that of the sham group, indicating that, after i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment, the damaged brain tissues of the rats with stroke were repaired quickly, enabling the recovery of forepaw-grip strength. Based on these results, we concluded that damaged brain tissues can be repaired faster and motor function can be recovered efficiently in rats with stroke after i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment.

The i-ADSCs could differentiate into neuronal cells after transplantation into the brain. As a result, they moved and repaired damaged cerebral tissue selectively and improved cerebral functions by enhancing angiogenesis, renewal of neurons, and proliferation of nerve cells [4041]. In this study, we used the HE-immunostaining method and western blot analysis to evaluate brain tissue repair on Day 28 after stem cell transplantation treatment was performed in rats with stroke. The results of immunostaining were observed using a microscope. The structures were magnified 200 times, which showed that the brain tissue in the stroke lesion was dense and similar to that of normal brain tissue in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group. By contrast, numerous cavities were observed in the ischemic lesions of the brain tissues of the rats in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. These results indicated that necrotizing brain tissue after ischemia was quickly repaired when i-ADSCs (LS+) was used to treat the rats with stroke. We speculate that using i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment can accelerate the induction of ADSCs to differentiate into neuronal cells. Therefore, although the same number of stem cells was transplanted for treatment, a greater number of NSCs were observed in the i-ADSCs (LS+) group than in the i-ADSCs (LS?) group. Furthermore, because NSCs can protect damaged brain tissues from continuous deterioration, they can also help brain tissues to repair. Therefore, transplanting a greater amount of NSCs would likely assist in repairing brain tissues more effectively.

Regarding the results of the western blot analysis, the oligo-2 amounts after stem-cell transplantation treatment were analyzed. Because oligodendrocytes form myelin in the central nervous system, myelin levels collapse when oligodendrocytes die. Nerve conduction is delayed or interrupted after the death of oligodendrocytes, leading to limb disabilities. Therefore, the evaluation of oligo-2 could be a crucial reference in assessing the degree of brain tissue recovery after stem-cell transplantation treatments in rats with stroke. In this study, using western blot analysis showed that the amount of expression of oligo-2 in brain tissues treated with i-ADSCs (LS+) was similar to that in normal brain tissues. By contrast, brain tissues treated with i-ADSCs (LS?) exhibited a lower oligo-2 expression, indicating that using i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment in rats with stroke can repair myelin in the central nervous system, leading to the recovery of neural-signal conduction and motor function. Based on these experimental results, we concluded that using i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment in rats with stroke cannot only accelerate the repair of damaged brain tissues for the partial recovery of motor functions, but also enable the central nervous system to recover the velocity of neural-signal conduction. These results confirm that the transplantation of i-ADSCs (LS+) can accelerate repairs in rats with ischemic stroke because i-ADSCs (LS+) can more efficiently differentiate into NSCs.

5. Conclusion

In this study, we used i-ADSCs treated with large-area low-level laser irradiation to evaluate the effects of a low-level laser on cell proliferation and differentiation. The results showed that although a low-level laser cannot facilitate cell proliferation, it can accelerate the induction of ADSCs differentiating into NSCs. In this study, we successfully created large-area cell and tissue damage in rat brains by using an embolic stroke animal model. Stem-cell transplantation with either i-ADSCs (LS+) or i-ADSCs (LS?) was performed to evaluate the degree of repair after stroke in the animals. Because large-area low-level laser irradiation can accelerate the differentiation of ADSCs into NSCs, and NSCs can protect damaged brain tissues to prevent continuous deterioration from damage and to help with repair, the motor function recovery was thus superior in the rats treated using i-ADSCs (LS+) compared with that in the rats treated using i-ADSCs (LS?). From the brain tissue slices from each group of rats, we discovered that i-ADSCs (LS+) treatment more effectively repaired necrotizing brain tissues after ischemia in rat brains. Furthermore, the western blot analysis also showed that the amount of oligo-2 increased in i-ADSCs (LS+)-treated rats with stroke, confirming the repair of myelin in cerebral neurons to further assist in the recovery of neural-signal conduction in the central nervous system.

Therefore, in the present study we demonstrated that using large-area low-level lasers exerts positive effects on inducing ADSCs differentiation, and it effectively treated ischemic stroke in rats, regarding motor function recovery. In future studies, the effects of large-area low-level laser irradiation time and the appropriate dosage for the proliferation and differentiation of ADSCs should be evaluated. If the optimal irradiation time and dosage for ADSC proliferation and differentiation can be discovered in animal experiments similar to those in this study, we believe that superior experimental results can be obtained. Furthermore, if primate or canine experimental animals can be used to conduct the experimental protocols described herein, the concerns associated with individual animal differences and errors associated with motor function assessments can be minimized to obtain more reliable experimental data. Therefore, the findings of this study contribute to the development of cell therapy, which can benefit patients with stroke.

Conflict of Interests

There is no conflict of interests.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the Taichung Veterans General Hospital and Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Grant. TCVGH-CTUST 1027701) and the National Science Council (Grant. NSC 102-2314-B-075A-019-MY2), Taiwan.

References
1. Chalela JA, Kidwell CS, Nentwich LM, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison. The Lancet.2007;369(9558):293–298. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
2. Hackam DG, Spence JD. Combining multiple approaches for the secondary prevention of vascular events after stroke: a quantitative modeling study. Stroke. 2007;38(6):1881–1885. [PubMed]
3. Shen C-C, Lin C-H, Yang Y-C, Chiao M-T, Cheng W-Y, Ko J-L. Intravenous implanted neural stem cells migrate to injury site, reduce infarct volume, and improve behavior after cerebral ischemia.Current Neurovascular Research. 2010;7(3):167–179. [PubMed]
4. Yang Y-C, Liu B-S, Shen C-C, Lin C-H, Chiao M-T, Cheng H-C. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells for treatment of focal cerebral ischemia. Current Neurovascular Research.2011;8(1):1–13. [PubMed]
5. Zuk PA, Zhu M, Ashjian P, et al. Human adipose tissue is a source of multipotent stem cells.Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2002;13(12):4279–4295. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
6. Karu TI, Pyatibrat LV, Kalendo GS. Esenaliev RO. Effects of monochromatic low-intensity light and laser irradiation on adhesion of cells in vitro. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 1996;18:171–177.[PubMed]
7. Gaida K, Koller R, Isler C, et al. Low level laser therapy—a conservative approach to the burn scar?Burns. 2004;30(4):362–367. [PubMed]
8. Karu T. Photobiology of low-power laser effects. Health Physics. 1989;56(5):691–704. [PubMed]
9. Mester E, Mester AF, Mester A. The biomedical effects of laser application. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 1985;5(1):31–39. [PubMed]
10. Conlan MJ, Rapley JW, Cobb CM. Biostimulation of wound healing by low-energy laser irradiation. A review. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 1996;3:492–496. [PubMed]
11. Yaakobi T, Maltz L, Oron U. Promotion of bone repair in the cortical bone of the tibia in rats by low energy laser (He-Ne) irradiation. Calcified Tissue International. 1996;59(4):297–300. [PubMed]
12. Ozen T, Orhan K, Gorur I, Ozturk A. Efficacy of low level laser therapy on neurosensory recovery after injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. Head & Face Medicine. 2006;2, article 3 [PMC free article][PubMed]
13. Miloro M, Halkias LE, Mallery S, Travers S, Rashid RG. Low-level laser effect on neural regeneration in Gore-Tex tubes. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics.2002;93(1):27–34. [PubMed]
14. Khullar SM, Emami B, Westermark A, Haanæs HR. Effect of low-level laser treatment on neurosensory deficits subsequent to saggittal split ramus osteotomy. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. 1996;82(2):132–138. [PubMed]
15. Dos Reis FA, Belchior ACG, De Carvalho PDTC, et al. Effect of laser therapy (660 nm) on recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats after injury through neurotmesis followed by epineural anastomosis. Lasers in Medical Science. 2009;24(5):741–747. [PubMed]
16. Belchior ACG, Dos Reis FA, Nicolau RA, Silva IS, Perreira DM, De Carvalho PDTC. Influence of laser (660 nm) on functional recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats following crushing lesion. Lasers in Medical Science. 2009;24(6):893–899. [PubMed]
17. Barbosa RI, Marcolino AM, De Jesus Guirro RR, Mazzer N, Barbieri CH, De Cássia Registro Fonseca M. Comparative effects of wavelengths of low-power laser in regeneration of sciatic nerve in rats following crushing lesion. Lasers in Medical Science. 2010;25(3):423–430. [PubMed]
18. Gigo-Benato D, Russo TL, Tanaka EH, Assis L, Salvini TF, Parizotto NA. Effects of 660 and 780 nm low-level laser therapy on neuromuscular recovery after crush injury in rat sciatic nerve. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2010;42(9):673–682. [PubMed]
19. Meng C, He Z, Xing D. Low-level laser therapy rescues dendrite atrophy via upregulating BDNF expression: implications for Alzheimer’s disease. The Journal of Neuroscience. 2013;33:13505–13517.[PubMed]
20. Shen C-C, Yang Y-C, Chiao M-T, Cheng W-Y, Tsuei Y-S, Ko J-L. Characterization of endogenous neural progenitor cells after experimental ischemic stroke. Current Neurovascular Research.2010;7(1):6–14. [PubMed]
21. Banas A, Teratani T, Yamamoto Y, et al. IFATS collection: in vivo therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation into mice with liver injury. Stem Cells.2008;26(10):2705–2712. [PubMed]
22. Sanchez PL, Sanz-Ruiz R, Fernandez-Santos ME, Fernandez-Aviles F. Cultured and freshly isolated adipose tissue-derived cells: fat years for cardiac stem cell therapy. European Heart Journal.2010;31(4):394–397. [PubMed]
23. Taha MF, Hedayati V. Isolation, identification and multipotential differentiation of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Tissue and Cell. 2010;42(4):211–216. [PubMed]
24. Fraser JK, Zhu M, Wulur I, Alfonso Z. Adipose-derived stem cells. Methods in Molecular Biology.2008;449:59–67. [PubMed]
25. Ishikawa T, Banas A, Hagiwara K, Iwaguro H, Ochiya T. Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy.2010;5(2):182–189. [PubMed]
26. Yukawa H, Noguchi H, Oishi K, et al. Cell transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in combination with heparin attenuated acute liver failure in mice. Cell Transplantation. 2009;18(5-6):611–618. [PubMed]
27. Wu JY, Chen CH, Yeh LY, Yeh ML, Ting CC, Wang YH. Low-power laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells via cyclic adenosine monophosphate. International Journal of Oral Science. 2013;5(2):85–91. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
28. Ang FY, Fukuzaki Y, Yamanoha B, Kogure S. Immunocytochemical studies on the effect of 405-nm low-power laser irradiation on human-derived A-172 glioblastoma cells. Lasers in Medical Science.2012;27(5):935–942. [PubMed]
29. Peplow PV, Chung T-Y, Baxter GD. Laser photobiomodulation of proliferation of cells in culture: a review of human and animal studies. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. 2010;28(1):p. S3, p. S40.[PubMed]
30. Vladimirov YA, Osipov AN, Klebanov GI. Photobiological principles of therapeutic applications of laser radiation. Biochemistry. 2004;69(1):81–90. [PubMed]
31. Tuby H, Hertzberg E, Maltz L, Oron U. Long-term safety of low-level laser therapy at different power densities and single or multiple applications to the bone marrow in mice. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. 2013;31(6):269–273. [PubMed]
32. Usumez A, Cengiz B, Oztuzcu S, Demir T, Aras MH, Gutknecht N. Effects of laser irradiation at different wavelengths (660, 810, 980, and 1.064 nm) on mucositis in an animal model of wound healing. Lasers in Medical Science. 2013 [PubMed]
33. Shen CC, Yang YC, Huang TB, Chan SC, Liu BS. Neural regeneration in a novel nerve conduit across a large gap of the transected sciatic nerve in rats with low-level laser phototherapy. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 2013;101(10):2763–2777. [PubMed]
34. Baratto L, Calzà L, Capra R, et al. Ultra-low-level laser therapy. Lasers in Medical Science.2011;26(1):103–112. [PubMed]
35. Rochkind S, Geuna S, Shainberg A. Chapter 25: Phototherapy in peripheral nerve injury: effects on muscle preservation and nerve regeneration. International Review of Neurobiology. 2009;87:445–464.[PubMed]
36. Rochklnd S, El-Ani D, Nevo Z, Shahar A. Increase of neuronal sprouting and migration using 780 nm laser phototherapy as procedure for cell therapy. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 2009;41(4):277–281. [PubMed]
37. Lan C-CE, Wu S-B, Wu C-S, et al. Induction of primitive pigment cell differentiation by visible light (helium-neon laser): a photoacceptor-specific response not replicable by UVB irradiation. Journal of Molecular Medicine. 2012;90:321–330. [PubMed]
38. Feng J, Zhang Y, Xing D. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) promotes VEGF expression and vascular endothelial cell proliferation through the activation of ERK/Sp1 pathway. Cellular Signalling.2012;24(6):1116–1125. [PubMed]
39. Song S, Zhou F, Chen WR. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases. Journal of Neuroinflammation. 2012;9, article 219 [PMC free article] [PubMed]
40. Valina C, Pinkernell K, Song Y-H, et al. Intracoronary administration of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells improves left ventricular function, perfusion, and remodelling after acute myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal. 2007;28(21):2667–2677. [PubMed]
41. DU H-W, Liu N, Wang J-H, Zhang Y-X, Chen R-H, Xiao Y-C. The effects of adipose-derived stem cell transplantation on the expression of IL-10 and TNF-alpha after cerebral ischaemia in rats. Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 2009;25(11):998–1001. [PubMed]

J Neuroinflammation.  2012 Sep 18;9(1):219. [Epub ahead of print]

Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

Song S, Zhou F, Chen WR, Xing D.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND:

Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2) low-level laser therapy (LLLT), a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses.

METHODS:

To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For the LLLT-induced neuroprotective study, neuronal cells with activated microglial cells in a Transwell[trade mark sign] cell-culture system were used. For the phagocytosis study, fluorescence-labeled microspheres were added into the treated microglial cells to confirm the role of LLLT.

RESULTS:

Our results showed that LLLT (20 J/cm2) could attenuate toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated proinflammatory responses in microglia, characterized by down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression and nitric oxide (NO) production. LLLT-triggered TLR signaling inhibition was achieved by activating tyrosine kinases Src and Syk, which led to MyD88 tyrosine phosphorylation, thus impairing MyD88-dependent proinflammatory signaling cascade. In addition, we found that Src activation could enhance Rac1 activity and F-actin accumulation that typify microglial phagocytic activity. We also found that Src/PI3K/Akt inhibitors prevented LLLT-stimulated Akt (Ser473 and Thr308) phosphorylation and blocked Rac1 activity and actin-based microglial phagocytosis, indicating the activation of Src/PI3K/Akt/Rac1 signaling pathway.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study underlines the importance of Src in suppressing inflammation and enhancing microglial phagocytic function in activated microglia during LLLT stimulation. We have identified a new and important neuroprotective signaling pathway that consists of regulation of microglial phagocytosis and inflammation under LLLT treatment. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

Front Biosci (Elite Ed).  2012 Jan 1;4:818-23.

Therapeutic effect of near infrared (NIR) light on Parkinson’s disease models.

Quirk BJ, Desmet KD, Henry M, Buchmann E, Wong-Riley M, Eells JT, Whelan HT.

Source

Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 W. Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects large numbers of people, particularly those of a more advanced age. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in PD, especially in the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial role allows the use of inhibitors of complex I and IV in PD models, and enhancers of complex IV activity, such as NIR light, to be used as possible therapy. PD models fall into two main categories; cell cultures and animal models. In cell cultures, primary neurons, mutant neuroblastoma cells, and cell cybrids have been studied in conjunction with NIR light. Primary neurons show protection or recovery of function and morphology by NIR light after toxic insult. Neuroblastoma cells, with a gene for mutant alpha-synuclein, show similar results. Cell cybrids, containing mtDNA from PD patients, show restoration of mitochondrial transport and complex I and IV assembly. Animal models include toxin-insulted mice, and alpha-synuclein transgenic mice. Functional recovery of the animals, chemical and histological evidence, and delayed disease progression show the potential of NIR light in treating Parkinson’s disease.

J Neurotrauma. 2012 Jan 20;29(2):401-7. doi: 10.1089/neu.2011.2062. Epub 2012 Jan 4.

Near infrared transcranial laser therapy applied at various modes to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits.

Oron A, Oron U, Streeter J, De Taboada L, Alexandrovich A, Trembovler V, Shohami E.

Source

Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel. oronu@post.tau.ac.il

Abstract

Near-infrared transcranial laser therapy (TLT) has been found to modulate various biological processes including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Following TBI in mice, in this study we assessed the possibility of various near-infrared TLT modes (pulsed versus continuous) in producing a beneficial effect on the long-term neurobehavioral outcome and brain lesions of these mice. TBI was induced by a weight-drop device, and neurobehavioral function was assessed from 1 h to 56 days post-trauma using the Neurological Severity Score (NSS). The extent of recovery is expressed as the difference in NSS (dNSS), the difference between the initial score and that at any other later time point. An 808-nm Ga-Al-As diode laser was employed transcranially 4, 6, or 8 h post-trauma to illuminate the entire cortex of the brain. Mice were divided into several groups of 6-8 mice: one control group that received a sham treatment and experimental groups that received either TLT continuous wave (CW) or pulsed wave (PW) mode transcranially. MRI was taken prior to sacrifice at 56 days post-injury. From 5-28 days post-TBI, the NSS of the laser-treated mice were significantly lower (p<0.05) than those of the non-laser-treated control mice. The percentage of surviving mice that demonstrated full recovery at 56 days post-CHI (NSS=0, as in intact mice) was the highest (63%) in the group that had received TLT in the PW mode at 100 Hz. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis demonstrated significantly smaller infarct lesion volumes in laser-treated mice compared to controls. Our data suggest that non-invasive TLT of mice post-TBI provides a significant long-term functional neurological benefit, and that the pulsed laser mode at 100 Hz is the preferred mode for such treatment.

J Neurotrauma. 2012 Jan 20;29(2):408-17. doi: 10.1089/neu.2010.1745. Epub 2011 Sep 21.

Low-level laser light therapy improves cognitive deficits and inhibits microglial activation after controlled cortical impact in mice.

Khuman J, Zhang J, Park J, Carroll JD, Donahue C, Whalen MJ.

Source

Neuroscience Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level laser light (800 nm) was applied directly to the contused parenchyma or transcranially in mice beginning 60-80 min after CCI. Injured mice treated with 60 J/cm² (500 mW/cm²×2 min) either transcranially or via an open craniotomy had modestly improved latency to the hidden platform (p<0.05 for group), and probe trial performance (p<0.01) compared to non-treated controls. The beneficial effects of LLLT in open craniotomy mice were associated with reduced microgliosis at 48 h (21.8±2.3 versus 39.2±4.2 IbA-1+ cells/200×field, p<0.05). Little or no effect of LLLT on post-injury cognitive function was observed using the other doses, a 4-h administration time point and 7-day administration of 60 J/cm². No effect of LLLT (60 J/cm² open craniotomy) was observed on post-injury motor function (days 1-7), brain edema (24 h), nitrosative stress (24 h), or lesion volume (14 days). Although further dose optimization and mechanism studies are needed, the data suggest that LLLT might be a therapeutic option to improve cognitive recovery and limit inflammation after TBI.

J Neurotrauma. 2011 Sep 21. [Epub ahead of print]

Low-Level Laser Light Therapy Improves Cognitive Deficits and Inhibits Microglial Activation after Controlled Cortical Impact in Mice.

Khuman J, Zhang J, Park J, Carroll JD, Donahue C, Whalen MJ.

Source

1 Neuroscience Center, Massachusetts General Hospital , Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Abstract

Abstract Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level laser light (800?nm) was applied directly to the contused parenchyma or transcranially in mice beginning 60-80?min after CCI. Injured mice treated with 60?J/cm(2) (500?mW/cm(2)×2?min) either transcranially or via an open craniotomy had modestly improved latency to the hidden platform (p<0.05 for group), and probe trial performance (p<0.01) compared to non-treated controls. The beneficial effects of LLLT in open craniotomy mice were associated with reduced microgliosis at 48?h (21.8±2.3 versus 39.2±4.2 IbA-1+ cells/200×field, p<0.05). Little or no effect of LLLT on post-injury cognitive function was observed using the other doses, a 4-h administration time point and 7-day administration of 60?J/cm(2). No effect of LLLT (60?J/cm(2) open craniotomy) was observed on post-injury motor function (days 1-7), brain edema (24?h), nitrosative stress (24?h), or lesion volume (14 days). Although further dose optimization and mechanism studies are needed, the data suggest that LLLT might be a therapeutic option to improve cognitive recovery and limit inflammation after TBI.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2011 May;29(5):351-8. doi: 10.1089/pho.2010.2814. Epub 2010 Dec 23.

Improved cognitive function after transcranial, light-emitting diode treatments in chronic, traumatic brain injury: two case reports.

Naeser MA1, Saltmarche A, Krengel MH, Hamblin MR, Knight JA.

Author information

  • 1VA Boston Healthcare System , Boston, Massachusetts. mnaeser@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are presented.

BACKGROUND:

Significant benefits have been reported following application of transcranial, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to humans with acute stroke and mice with acute TBI. These are the first case reports documenting improved cognitive function in chronic, TBI patients treated with transcranial LED.

METHODS:

Treatments were applied bilaterally and to midline sagittal areas using LED cluster heads [2.1? diameter, 61 diodes (9?×?633?nm, 52?×?870?nm); 12-15?mW per diode; total power: 500?mW; 22.2?mW/cm(2); 13.3?J/cm(2) at scalp (estimated 0.4?J/cm(2) to cortex)].

RESULTS:

Seven years after closed-head TBI from a motor vehicle accident, Patient 1 began transcranial LED treatments. Pre-LED, her ability for sustained attention (computer work) lasted 20 min. After eight weekly LED treatments, her sustained attention time increased to 3 h. The patient performs nightly home treatments (5 years); if she stops treating for more than 2 weeks, she regresses. Patient 2 had a history of closed-head trauma (sports/military, and recent fall), and magnetic resonance imaging showed frontoparietal atrophy. Pre-LED, she was on medical disability for 5 months. After 4 months of nightly LED treatments at home, medical disability discontinued; she returned to working full-time as an executive consultant with an international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing after 9 months of transcranial LED indicated significant improvement (+1, +2SD) in executive function (inhibition, inhibition accuracy) and memory, as well as reduction in post-traumatic stress disorder. If she stops treating for more than 1 week, she regresses. At the time of this report, both patients are continuing treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Transcranial LED may improve cognition, reduce costs in TBI treatment, and be applied at home. Controlled studies are warranted

Postepy High Med Dosw (Online).  2011 Feb 17;65:73-92.

The role of biological sciences in understanding the genesis and a new therapeutic approach to Alzheimer’s disease.

T?gowska E, Wosi?ska A.

Zak?ad Toksykologii Zwierz?t, Wydzia? Biologii i Nauk o Ziemi, Uniwersytet Miko?aja Kopernika w Toruniu.

Abstract

The paper contrasts the historical view on causal factors in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with the modern concept of the symptoms’ origin. Biological sciences dealing with cell structure and physiology enabled comprehension of the role of mitochondrial defects in the processes of formation of neurofibrillary tangles and ?-amyloid, which in turn gives hope for developing a new, more effective therapeutic strategy for AD. It has been established that although mitochondria constantly generate free radicals, from which they are protected by their own defensive systems, in some situations these systems become deregulated, which leads to free radical-based mitochondrial defects. This causes an energetic deficit in neurons and a further increase in the free radical pool. As a result, due to compensation processes, formation of tangles and/or acceleration of ?-amyloid production takes place. The nature of these processes is initially a protective one, due to their anti-oxidative action, but as the amount of the formations increases, their beneficial effect wanes. They become a storage place for substances enhancing free radical processes, which makes them toxic themselves. It is such an approach to the primary causal factor for AD which lies at the roots of the new view on AD therapy, suggesting the use of methylene blue-based drugs, laser or intranasally applied insulin. A necessary condition, however, for these methods’ effectiveness is definitely an earlier diagnosis of the disease. Although there are numerous diagnostic methods for AD, their low specificity and high price, often accompanied by a considerable level of patient discomfort, make them unsuitable for early, prodromal screening. In this matter a promising method may be provided using an olfactory test, which is an inexpensive and non-invasive method and thus suitable for screening, although as a test of low specificity, it should be combined with other methods. Introducing new methods of AD treatment does not mean abandoning the traditional ones, based on enhancing cholinergic transmission. They are valuable as long as the therapy starts when abundant brain inclusions disturb the transmissions.

J Comp Neurol. 2010 Jan 1;518(1):25-40.

Neuroprotection of midbrain dopaminergic cells in MPTP-treated mice after near-infrared light treatment.

Shaw VE, Spana S, Ashkan K, Benabid AL, Stone J, Baker GE, Mitrofanis J.

Discipline of Anatomy & Histology F13, University of Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

This study explores whether near-infrared (NIr) light treatment neuroprotects dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and the zona incerta-hypothalamus (ZI-Hyp) from degeneration in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice. BALB/c albino mice were divided into four groups: 1) Saline, 2) Saline-NIr, 3) MPTP, 4) MPTP-NIr. The injections were intraperitoneal and they were followed immediately by NIr light treatment (or not). Two doses of MPTP, mild (50 mg/kg) and strong (100 mg/kg), were used. Mice were perfused transcardially with aldehyde fixative 6 days after their MPTP treatment. Brains were processed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunochemistry. The number of TH(+) cells was estimated using the optical fractionator method. Our major finding was that in the SNc there were significantly more dopaminergic cells in the MPTP-NIr compared to the MPTP group (35%-45%). By contrast, in the ZI-Hyp there was no significant difference in the numbers of cells in these two groups. In addition, our results indicated that survival in the two regions after MPTP insult was dose-dependent. In the stronger MPTP regime, the magnitude of loss was similar in the two regions ( approximately 60%), while in the milder regime cell loss was greater in the SNc (45%) than ZI-Hyp ( approximately 30%). In summary, our results indicate that NIr light treatment offers neuroprotection against MPTP toxicity for dopaminergic cells in the SNc, but not in the ZI-Hyp.

J Photochem Photobiol B. 2009 Dec 2;97(3):145-51. Epub 2009 Sep 11.

Effect of phototherapy with low intensity laser on local and systemic immodulation following focal brain damage in rat.

Moreira MS, Velasco IT, Ferreira LS, Ariga SK, Barbeiro DF, Meneguzzo DT, Abatepaulo F, Marques MM.

LIM-51, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Brain injury is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in trauma patients, but controversy still exists over therapeutic management for these patients. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of phototherapy with low intensity lasers on local and systemic immunomodulation following cryogenic brain injury. Laser phototherapy was applied (or not-controls) immediately after cryogenic brain injury performed in 51 adult male Wistar rats. The animals were irradiated twice (3 h interval), with continuous diode laser (gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs), 780 nm, or indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide (InGaAlP), 660 nm) in two points and contact mode, 40 mW, spot size 0.042 cm(2), 3 J/cm(2) and 5 J/cm(2) (3 s and 5 s, respectively). The experimental groups were: Control (non-irradiated), RL3 (visible red laser/ 3 J/cm(2)), RL5 (visible red laser/5 J/cm(2)), IRL3 (infrared laser/3 J/cm(2)), IRL5 (infrared laser/5 J/cm(2)). The production of interleukin-1IL-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was analyzed by enzyme immunoassay technique (ELISA) test in brain and blood samples. The IL-1beta concentration in brain of the control group was significantly reduced in 24 h (p<0.01). This reduction was also observed in the RL5 and IRL3 groups. The TNF-alpha and IL-6 concentrations increased significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) in the blood of all groups, except by the IRL3 group. The IL-6 levels in RL3 group were significantly smaller than in control group in both experimental times. IL-10 concentration was maintained stable in all groups in brain and blood. Under the conditions of this study, it is possible to conclude that the laser phototherapy can affect TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 levels in the brain and in circulation in the first 24 h following cryogenic brain injury.

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):3-11.

Many-level polysensory stimulation of brain functions by physical therapeutic agents.

[Article in Russian]

Tyshkevich TG, Ponomarenko GN.

A combination of physiotherapeutic methods for neurorehabilitative treatment has been developed and applied to the treatment of 576 patients with neurosurgical problems including the loss of brain functions as a sequel to nervous system lesions of traumatic, vascular, and other origin. Methodologically, this complex is adapted to the level and extent of the lesion and the character of regeneration of the nervous tissues. It implies many-level stimulation of neuroregeneration by syndromically and pathogenetically substantiated application of physical factors in the early post-injury and postoperative periods. The proposed approach allows the brain function to be completely restored by virtue of persistent compensatory changes in the nervous system. A combination of many-level magnetic, electrical, and laser stimulation is recommended to manage lesions in the speech, motor, and visual analyzers. Combined laser and differential electrostimulation may be prescribed to patients with nerve lesions, extremely high frequency therapy to those with epileptic syndrome, combined microwave therapy to cases with impairment of consciousness, and a variant of systemic UV irradiation with underwater shower-massaging for the treatment of vegetative and asthenic disturbances. Selected physiological aspects of the action of the above physical factors are specified. This physiotherapeutic system is protected by 20 RF patents of invention.

Mol Neurodegener. 2009 Jun 17;4:26.

Reduced axonal transport in Parkinson’s disease cybrid neurites is restored by light therapy.

Trimmer PA, Schwartz KM, Borland MK, De Taboada L, Streeter J, Oron U.

University of Virginia, Morris K Udall Parkinson’s Research Center of Excellence and Department of Neurology, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. pat5q@virginia.edu.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that reduced axonal transport contributes to the degeneration of neuronal processes in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Mitochondria supply the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed to support axonal transport and contribute to many other cellular functions essential for the survival of neuronal cells. Furthermore, mitochondria in PD tissues are metabolically and functionally compromised. To address this hypothesis, we measured the velocity of mitochondrial movement in human transmitochondrial cybrid “cytoplasmic hybrid” neuronal cells bearing mitochondrial DNA from patients with sporadic PD and disease-free age-matched volunteer controls (CNT). The absorption of low level, near-infrared laser light by components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC) enhances mitochondrial metabolism, stimulates oxidative phosphorylation and improves redox capacity. PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells were exposed to near-infrared laser light to determine if the velocity of mitochondrial movement can be restored by low level light therapy (LLLT). Axonal transport of labeled mitochondria was documented by time lapse microscopy in dopaminergic PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells before and after illumination with an 810 nm diode laser (50 mW/cm2) for 40 seconds. Oxygen utilization and assembly of mtETC complexes were also determined.

RESULTS: The velocity of mitochondrial movement in PD cybrid neuronal cells (0.175 +/- 0.005 SEM) was significantly reduced (p < 0.02) compared to mitochondrial movement in disease free CNT cybrid neuronal cells (0.232 +/- 0.017 SEM). For two hours after LLLT, the average velocity of mitochondrial movement in PD cybrid neurites was significantly (p < 0.003) increased (to 0.224 +/- 0.02 SEM) and restored to levels comparable to CNT. Mitochondrial movement in CNT cybrid neurites was unaltered by LLLT (0.232 +/- 0.017 SEM). Assembly of complexes in the mtETC was reduced and oxygen utilization was altered in PD cybrid neuronal cells. PD cybrid neuronal cell lines with the most dysfunctional mtETC assembly and oxygen utilization profiles were least responsive to LLLT.

CONCLUSION: The results from this study support our proposal that axonal transport is reduced in sporadic PD and that a single, brief treatment with near-infrared light can restore axonal transport to control levels. These results are the first demonstration that LLLT can increase axonal transport in model human dopaminergic neuronal cells and they suggest that LLLT could be developed as a novel treatment to improve neuronal function in patients with PD.

Lasers Surg Med. 2009 Apr;41(4):277-81.

Increase of neuronal sprouting and migration using 780 nm laser phototherapy as procedure for cell therapy.

Rochkind S, El-Ani D, Nevo Z, Shahar A.

Division of Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. rochkind@zahav.net.il

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The present study focuses on the effect of 780 nm laser irradiation on the growth of embryonic rat brain cultures embedded in NVR-Gel (cross-linked hyaluronic acid with adhesive molecule laminin and several growth factors). Dissociated neuronal cells were first grown in suspension attached to cylindrical microcarriers (MCs). The formed floating cell-MC aggregates were subsequently transferred into stationary cultures in gel and then laser treated. The response of neuronal growth following laser irradiation was investigated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Whole brains were dissected from 16 days Sprague-Dawley rat embryos. Cells were mechanically dissociated, using narrow pipettes, and seeded on positively charged cylindrical MCs. After 4-14 days in suspension, the formed floating cell-MC aggregates were seeded as stationary cultures in NVR-Gel. Single cell-MC aggregates were either irradiated with near-infrared 780 nm laser beam for 1, 4, or 7 minutes, or cultured without irradiation. Laser powers were 10, 30, 50, 110, 160, 200, and 250 mW.

RESULTS: 780 nm laser irradiation accelerated fiber sprouting and neuronal cell migration from the aggregates. Furthermore, unlike control cultures, the irradiated cultures (mainly after 1 minute irradiation of 50 mW) were already established after a short time of cultivation. They contained a much higher number of large size neurons (P<0.01), which formed dense branched interconnected networks of thick neuronal fibers.

CONCLUSIONS: 780 nm laser phototherapy of embryonic rat brain cultures embedded in hyaluronic acid-laminin gel and attached to positively charged cylindrical MCs, stimulated migration and fiber sprouting of neuronal cells aggregates, developed large size neurons with dense branched interconnected network of neuronal fibers and, therefore, can be considered as potential procedure for cell therapy of neuronal injury or disease.

Lasers Surg Med. 2009 Jan;41(1):52-9.

Light therapy and supplementary Riboflavin in the SOD1 transgenic mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS).

Moges H, Vasconcelos OM, Campbell WW, Borke RC, McCoy JA, Kaczmarczyk L, Feng J, Anders JJ.

Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons and death. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play an important role in motor neuron loss in ALS. Light therapy (LT) has biomodulatory effects on mitochondria. Riboflavin improves energy efficiency in mitochondria and reduces oxidative injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the synergistic effect of LT and riboflavin on the survival of motor neurons in a mouse model of FALS.

STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: G93A SOD1 transgenic mice were divided into four groups: Control, Riboflavin, Light, and Riboflavin+Light (combination). Mice were treated from 51 days of age until death. A single set of LT parameters was used: 810 nm diode laser, 140-mW output power, 1.4 cm(2) spot area, 120 seconds treatment duration, and 12 J/cm(2) energy density. Behavioral tests and weight monitoring were done weekly. At end stage of the disease, mice were euthanized, survival data was collected and immunohistochemistry and motor neuron counts were performed.

RESULTS: There was no difference in survival between groups. Motor function was not significantly improved with the exception of the rotarod test which showed significant improvement in the Light group in the early stage of the disease. Immunohistochemical expression of the astrocyte marker, glial fibrilary acidic protein, was significantly reduced in the cervical and lumbar enlargements of the spinal cord as a result of LT. There was no difference in the number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the lumbar enlargement between groups.

CONCLUSIONS: The lack of significant improvement in survival and motor performance indicates study interventions were ineffective in altering disease progression in the G93A SOD1 mice. Our findings have potential implications for the conceptual use of light to treat other neurodegenerative diseases that have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction.

Brain Res. 2008 Dec 3;1243:167-73. Epub 2008 Sep 30.

Pretreatment with near-infrared light via light-emitting diode provides added benefit against rotenone- and MPP+-induced neurotoxicity.

Ying R, Liang HL, Whelan HT, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT.

Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a movement disorder caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, leading to nigrostriatal degeneration. The inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and oxidative stress-induced damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. The present study used these specific mitochondrial complex I inhibitors (rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium or MPP(+)) on striatal and cortical neurons in culture. The goal was to test our hypothesis that pretreatment with near-infrared light (NIR) via light-emitting diode (LED) had a greater beneficial effect on primary neurons grown in media with rotenone or MPP(+) than those with or without LED treatment during exposure to poisons. Striatal and visual cortical neurons from newborn rats were cultured in a media with or without 200 nM of rotenone or 250 microM of MPP(+) for 48 h. They were treated with NIR-LED twice a day before, during, and both before and during the exposure to the poison. Results indicate that pretreatment with NIR-LED significantly suppressed rotenone- or MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in both striatal and cortical neurons (P<0.001), and that pretreatment plus LED treatment during neurotoxin exposure was significantly better than LED treatment alone during exposure to neurotoxins. In addition, MPP(+) induced a decrease in neuronal ATP levels (to 48% of control level) that was reversed significantly to 70% of control by NIR-LED pretreatment. These data suggest that LED pretreatment is an effective adjunct preventative therapy in rescuing neurons from neurotoxins linked to PD.

Neuroscience. 2008 Jun 2;153(4):963-74. Epub 2008 Mar 26.

Near-infrared light via light-emitting diode treatment is therapeutic against rotenone- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity.

Liang HL, Whelan HT, Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT.

Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Parkinson’s disease is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Thus, therapeutic approaches that improve mitochondrial function may prove to be beneficial. Previously, we have documented that near-infrared light via light-emitting diode (LED) treatment was therapeutic to neurons functionally inactivated by tetrodotoxin, potassium cyanide (KCN), or methanol intoxication, and LED pretreatment rescued neurons from KCN-induced apoptotic cell death. The current study tested our hypothesis that LED treatment can protect neurons from both rotenone- and MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. Primary cultures of postnatal rat striatal and cortical neurons served as models, and the optimal frequency of LED treatment per day was also determined. Results indicated that LED treatments twice a day significantly increased cellular adenosine triphosphate content, decreased the number of neurons undergoing cell death, and significantly reduced the expressions of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in rotenone- or MPP(+)-exposed neurons as compared with untreated ones. These results strongly suggest that LED treatment may be therapeutic to neurons damaged by neurotoxins linked to Parkinson’s disease by energizing the cells and increasing their viability.

J Neurotrauma. 2007 Apr;24(4):651-6.

Low-level laser therapy applied transcranially to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits.

Oron A, Oron U, Streeter J, de Taboada L, Alexandrovich A, Trembovler V, Shohami E.

Department of Orthopedics, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel. amiroronmd@gmail.com

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been evaluated in this study as a potential therapy for traumatic brain injury (TBI). LLLT has been found to modulate various biological processes. Following TBI in mice, we assessed the hypothesis that LLLT might have a beneficial effect on their neurobehavioral and histological outcome. TBI was induced by a weight-drop device, and motor function was assessed 1 h post-trauma using a neurological severity score (NSS). Mice were then divided into three groups of eight mice each: one control group that received a sham LLLT procedure and was not irradiated; and two groups that received LLLT at two different doses (10 and 20 mW/cm(2) ) transcranially. An 808-nm Ga-As diode laser was employed transcranially 4 h post-trauma to illuminate the entire cortex of the brain. Motor function was assessed up to 4 weeks, and lesion volume was measured. There were no significant changes in NSS at 24 and 48 h between the laser-treated and non-treated mice. Yet, from 5 days and up to 28 days, the NSS of the laser-treated mice were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the traumatized control mice that were not treated with the laser. The lesion volume of the laser treated mice was significantly lower (1.4%) than the non-treated group (12.1%). Our data suggest that a non-invasive transcranial application of LLLT given 4 h following TBI provides a significant long-term functional neurological benefit. Further confirmatory trials are warranted.

Photomed Laser Surg. 2006 Aug;24(4):458-66

Effects of power densities, continuous and pulse frequencies, and number of sessions of low-level laser therapy on intact rat brain.

Ilic S, Leichliter S, Streeter J, Oron A, DeTaboada L, Oron U.

Photothera Inc., Carlsbad, California, USA.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible short- and long-term adverse neurological effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) given at different power densities, frequencies, and modalities on the intact rat brain.

BACKGROUND DATA: LLLT has been shown to modulate biological processes depending on power density, wavelength, and frequency. To date, few well-controlled safety studies on LLLT are available. METHODS: One hundred and eighteen rats were used in the study. Diode laser (808 nm, wavelength) was used to deliver power densities of 7.5, 75, and 750 mW/cm2 transcranially to the brain cortex of mature rats, in either continuous wave (CW) or pulse (Pu) modes. Multiple doses of 7.5 mW/cm2 were also applied. Standard neurological examination of the rats was performed during the follow-up periods after laser irradiation. Histology was performed at light and electron microscopy levels.

RESULTS: Both the scores from standard neurological tests and the histopathological examination indicated that there was no long-term difference between laser-treated and control groups up to 70 days post-treatment. The only rats showing an adverse neurological effect were those in the 750 mW/cm2 (about 100-fold optimal dose), CW mode group. In Pu mode, there was much less heating, and no tissue damage was noted. CONCLUSION: Long-term safety tests lasting 30 and 70 days at optimal 10x and 100x doses, as well as at multiple doses at the same power densities, indicate that the tested laser energy doses are safe under this treatment regime. Neurological deficits and histopathological damage to 750 mW/cm2 CW laser irradiation are attributed to thermal damage and not due to tissue-photon interactions.

Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2005 Mar;3(2):128-31.

Protective effect of low-level irradiation on acupuncture points combined with iontophoresis against focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

[Article in Chinese]

Dai JY, Ge LB, Zhou YL, Wang L.

Acupuncture Clinic, Institute of Qigong, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200030, China. djysh2002@yahoo.com.cn

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on acupuncture points combined with iontophoresis against brain damage after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats.

METHODS: Sixty-nine SD rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal group, sham operation group, model group, electro-acupuncture group and low-level laser irradiation on acupuncture points combined with iontophoresis group (LLLI group). The cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) model was established by thread embolism of middle cerebral artery. The rats in the LLLI group, as well as the electro-acupuncture group were given treatment as soon as the occlusion finished (0 hour) and 12, 24 hours after the occlusion. We observed the changes of neurological deficit scores and the body weight of the rats at different time. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the ratos brain tissue were tested.

RESULTS: The neurological deficit score of the LLLI group was significantly lower than that of the model group. The body weight and the activity of SOD of the rats decreased slightly, and the content of MDA decreased significantly after the treatment.

CONCLUSION: The low-level laser irradiation on acupuncture points combined with iontophoresis can prevent focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. One of its mechanisms may be increasing the activity of SOD and decreasing the damage of the oxidation products to the body.

Mitochondrion. 2004 Sep;4(5-6):559-67.

Mitochondrial signal transduction in accelerated wound and retinal healing by near-infrared light therapy.

Eells JT, Wong-Riley MT, VerHoeve J, Henry M, Buchman EV, Kane MP, Gould LJ, Das R, Jett M, Hodgson BD, Margolis D, Whelan HT.

Department of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA. jeells@uwm.edu

Photobiomodulation by light in the red to near infrared range (630-1000 nm) using low energy lasers or light-emitting diode (LED) arrays has been shown to accelerate wound healing, improve recovery from ischemic injury in the heart and attenuate degeneration in the injured optic nerve. Recent evidence indicates that the therapeutic effects of red to near infrared light result, in part, from intracellular signaling mechanisms triggered by the interaction of NIR light with the mitochondrial photoacceptor molecule cytochrome c oxidase. We have demonstrated that NIR-LED photo-irradiation increases the production of cytochrome oxidase in cultured primary neurons and reverses the reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity produced by metabolic inhibitors. We have also shown that NIR-LED treatment prevents the development of oral mucositis in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients. Photobiomodulation improves wound healing in genetically diabetic mice by upregulating genes important in the promotion of wound healing. More recent studies have provided evidence for the therapeutic benefit of NIR-LED treatment in the survival and functional recovery of the retina and optic nerve in vivo after acute injury by the mitochondrial toxin, formic acid generated in the course of methanol intoxication. Gene discovery studies conducted using microarray technology documented a significant upregulation of gene expression in pathways involved in mitochondrial energy production and antioxidant cellular protection. These findings provide a link between the actions of red to near infrared light on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in vitro and cell injury in vivo. Based on these findings and the strong evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases processes, we propose that NIR-LED photobiomodulation represents an innovative and non-invasive therapeutic approach for the treatment of tissue injury and disease processes in which mitochondrial dysfunction is postulated to play a role including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy and Parkinson’s disease.

Patol Fiziol Eksp Ter. 2004 Jan-Mar;(1):15-8.

Biochemical and immunological indices of the blood in Parkinson’s disease and their correction with the help of laser therapy.

[Article in Russian]

Komel’kova LV, Vitreshchak TV, Zhirnova IG, Poleshchuk VV, Stvolinskii SL, Mikhailov VV, Gannushkina IV, Piradov MA.

The influence of laser therapy on the course of Parkinson’s disease (PD) was studied in 70 patients. This influence appeared adaptogenic both in the group with elevated and low MAO B and Cu/Zn SOD activity. Laser therapy resulted in reduction of neurological deficit, normalization of the activity of MAO B, Cu/Zn-SOD and immune indices. There was a correlation between humoral immunity and activity of the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase). This justifies pathogenetically the use of laser therapy in PD.

Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 May;135(5):430-2.

Laser modification of the blood in vitro and in vivo in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Vitreshchak TV, Mikhailov VV, Piradov MA, Poleshchuk VV, Stvolinskii SL, Boldyrev AA.

Institute of Neurology of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.

The effect of He-Ne laser radiation on activity of MAO B, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, and catalase in blood cells from patients with Parkinson’s disease was studied in vivo and in vitro. The effects of intravenous in vivo irradiation (intravenous laser therapy) were more pronounced than those observed in similar in vitro experiments. It is concluded that generalized effect of laser therapy involves interaction between blood cells.

Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 5229, pp. 97-103 (2003). Laser Technology VII: Applications of Lasers. DOI: 10.1117/12.520611

Laser biostimulation of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis in respect to the biological influence of laser light.

Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Klimek, Andrzej; Sopinski, Marek; Obrzejta, Dominik

AA (Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland)), AB (Copernicus Hospital (Poland)), AC(Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland)), AD (Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland))

The authors discuss the results, obtained so far during three years’ clinical examination, of laser therapy in the treatment of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. They regard both the results of former laboratory experiments and so far discovered mechanisms of biological influence of laser light as an objective explanation of high effectiveness of laser therapy in the case of this so far incurable disease. They discuss wide range of biological mechanisms of laser therapy, examined so far on different levels (cell, tissue, organ), allowing the explanation of beneficial influence of laser light in pathogenetically different morbidities.

Neurol Res. 2002 Jn;24(4):355-60.

Transplantation of embryonal spinal cord nerve cells cultured on biodegradable microcarriers followed by low power laser irradiation for the treatment of traumatic paraplegia in rats.

Rochkind S, Shahar A, Amon M, Nevo Z.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. rochkind@zahav.net.il

This pilot study examined the effects of composite implants of cultured embryonal nerve cells and laser irradiation on the regeneration and repair of the completely transected spinal cord. Embryonal spinal cord nerve cells dissociated from rat fetuses and cultured on biodegradable microcarriers and embedded in hyaluronic acid were implanted in the completely transected spinal cords of 24 adult rats. For 14 consecutive post-operative days, 15 rats underwent low power laser irradiation (780 nm, 250 mW), 30 min daily. Eleven of the 15 (73%) showed different degrees of active leg movements and gait performance, compared to 4 (44%) of the 9 rats with implantation alone. In a controlgroup of seven rats with spinal cord transection and no transplantation or laser, six (86%) remained completely paralyzed. Three months after transection, implantation and laser irradiation, SSEPs were elicited in 69% of rats (p = 0.0237) compared to 37.5% in the nonirradiated group. The control group had no SSEPs response. Intensive axonal sprouting occurred in the group with implantation and laser. In the control group, the transected area contained proliferating fibroblasts and blood capillaries only. This suggests: 1. These in vitro composite implants are a regenerative and reparative source for reconstructing the transected spinal cord. 2. Post-operative low power laser irradiation enhances axonal sprouting and spinal cord repair.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2002 Jan;93(1):27-34.

Low-level laser effect on neural regeneration in Gore-Tex tubes.

Miloro M, Halkias LE, Mallery S, Travers S, Rashid RG.

Department of Surgery, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha 68198-5180, USA.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of low-level laser (LLL) irradiation on neural regeneration in surgically created defects in the rabbit inferior alveolar nerve.

STUDY DESIGN: Five adult female New Zealand White rabbits underwent bilateral exposure of the inferior alveolar nerve. A 6-mm segment of nerve was resected, and the nerve gap was repaired via entubulation by using a Gore-Tex conduit. The experimental side received 10 postoperative LLL treatments with a 70-mW gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode at 4 sites per treatment. At 15 weeks after surgery, the nerve segments were harvested bilaterally and prepared for light microscopy. Basic fuchsin and toluidine blue were used to highlight myelinated axons. The segments were examined histomorphometrically by using computer analysis to determine mean axonal diameter, total fascicular surface area, and axonal density along the repair sites.

RESULTS: Gross examination of all nerves showed intact neural bundles with variable degrees of osseous remodeling. Light microscopic evaluation revealed organized regenerated neural tissue in both groups with more intrafascicular perineural tissue in the control group. Histomorphometric evaluation revealed increased axonal density in the laser treated group as compared with the control.

CONCLUSIONS: LLL irradiation may be a useful noninvasive adjunct to promote neuronal wound healing in surgically created defects repaired with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene entubulation.

ACTA LASER BIOLOGY SINICA Vol. 8, No.2, 1999

Vascular Low Level Laser Irradiation Therapy in Treatment of Brain Injury

WANG Yu ZHU Jing, et al

(Department of Neurosurgery, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Second Medical University, Shanghai Medical Centre for laser Research ,200001)

Abstract: To evaluate the effect and mechanism of Vascular Low Level Laser Irradiation Therapy on brain injury. In this study thirty-eight SpragueDawley rats received Feeney’s brain impact through a left lateral craniectomy under anesthesia. Control and treatment group are set up. According to the time exposed to laser and irradiating postinjury, the treatment group is divided in four subgroups by design. Semiconductor laser was used with a power of 5mW to irridate straightly Rat’s femur venous. The Y Water maze was used to assess cognitive performance. Superoxide dismutase(SOD) activity and the level of metabolic production of free radical MDA in Brain and erythrocyte were measured to determinate the level of free radical. We find Vascular Low Level Laser Irradiation Therapy can improve posttraumatic memory deficits. SOD activity is higher in treatment groups than the control group meanwhile the level of MDA is lower. These findings suggest that Vascular Low Level Laser Irradiation produced a significant reduction in free radical’s damage to the brain postinjury.

INFARED LASER RADIATION IN THE TREATMENT OF BRAIN INJURY CONSEQUENCES

E.L. Macheret, A.O. Korkushko, T.N. Kalishchuk, M.N. Matyash

Medical Academy of Post-Diploma Education, Kiev, Ukraine

The examination of 198 patients aged 16-47 has revealed a high fre­quency of progressive pathologic states in a form of asthenia, vegeto-vascular dystonia, hypertensive, somato-vegetative, vestibular syndroms. Taking into account the changes in cortico-undercortical interrelations and expansion of pathologic process in hypothalamic area during the head trauma, we have developed effective treating methods by means of laseropuncture. Laser rays influence on acupuncture points (AP) leads to a convergence of the afferent messages upon the neurones of spinal cord, reticular formation, thalamus, hypothalamus and brain cor­tex. As a result of that a dynamic balance between the inhibition and excitation processes in the structures of central nervous system leading vegetative function and endocrine secretion recovers.  Use of infrared laser radiation is the most perspective. It docs not cause the direct photochemical reactions in biological tissues, but influences on physico-chemical structure of AP biomolecules. For laseropuncture we used an apparatus “BIOMED-01? with a wavelength of 0.89 nm. The work regime is impulsive-continuous with a modulation of frequency – from 0.1 to 1000 Hz. The middle power is up to 20 mW. The total time of the action for one sitting is till 20 min. The points selections was carried out on the grounds of the methods of acupuncture diagnosis, imagesking out the dominant clinical syndromes and including points of vascular, vegetotroimages, sedative orientation. Our clinical results, which were confirmed by paraclinical methods (EEG, dopplerography) and methods of acupuncture diagnosis have shown a high effectiveness of this therapy decreasing the drugs load and having no contradictions.

LASER-THERAPY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON HEMODYNAMICS WITH PATIENTS SUFFERED FROM GRAVE CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

Y.V. Kurako

Medical Academy, Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine

Despite the maximal dosage of different medications taken for curing of grave craniocerebral trauma the resistance to the treatment carried out was observed. This fact stimulated the search of new methods and ways of therapy. One of the possible methods is a non-medicamental treatment based on blood irradiation with low-active helium-neon laser. The present paper presents some data concerning the laser-therapy influence in hemodynamics in the case of craniocerebral trauma. The total number of patients examined is 45. Laser-therapy was carried out through the subclavian vein (37 cases) or cubital vein (8 cases). For primary irradiation the preferable access was the central one. It was used in the acute period of craniocerebral trauma. The periferal access was used for irradiation in the posthospital period. The course of laser therapy for in-hospital patients consisted of 3-5 everyday procedures of 30 minutes each. To define the hemodynamic changes with the patients suffered from craniocerebral trauma both clinical observation and ultrasonic transcranial dopplerography were used. The last one gave the possibility to identify the type of blood flow speed disorders.

Paper received 10 May 1999; accepted after revision 23 August 1999.

Specific Effects of Laserpuncture on the Cerebral Circulation

G. Litscher (1), L. Wang (1), M. Wiesner-Zechmeister (2)(1)

Biomedical Engineering, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Graz, Graz, Austria(2) European Forum for Lasertherapy and Fractal Medicine

Abstract . Acupuncture is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that has developed over thousands of years. We studied the effects of laser puncture, needle acupuncture, and light stimulation on cerebral blood flow in 15 healthy volunteers (mean age 25.0±1.9 years, 5 female, 10 male) with non-invasive transcranial Doppler sonography. In addition 40-Hz stimulus-induced brain oscillations, heart rate, blood pressure, peripheral and cerebral oxygen saturation, and the bispectral index of the EEG were recorded. Stimulation with light significantly increased blood flow velocity in the posterior cerebral artery (p<0.01, ANOVA). Similar but less pronounced effects were seen after needle acupuncture (p< 0.05, ANOVA) and laserpuncture (n.s.) of vision-related acupuncture points. Furthermore both, laserpuncture and needle acupuncture, led to a significant increase in the amplitudes of 40-Hz cerebral oscillations. Stimulation of vision-related acupuncture points with laser light or needle acupuncture elicits specific effects in specific areas of the brain. The results indicate that the brain plays a key intermediate role in acupuncture. However, brain activity of itself does not explain anything about the healing power of acupuncture.

Keywords: Acupuncture; Brain; 40 Hz brain oscillations; Cerebral blood flow velocity; Laserpuncture; Light stimulation; Middle cerebral artery (MCA); Posterior cerebral artery (PCA); Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)

Light Therapy (LLLT) alters gene expression after acute spinal cord injury

K.R. Byrnes 1, R.W. Waynant 2, I.K. Ilev 2, B. Johnson 1, Pollard H. 1, Srivastava M. 1, Eidelman O. 1, Huang, W. 1, J.J. Anders1

1. Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2. Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD, USA

Secondary injury in the spinal cord, which results in axonal degeneration, scar and cavity formation and cell death, occurs around the site of the initial trauma and is a primary cause for the lack of axonal regeneration observed after spinal cord injury (SCI). The immune response after SCI is under investigation as a potential mediator of secondary injury. Treatment of SCI with 810 nm light suppresses the immune response and improves axonal regeneration.

We hypothesize that these beneficial effects observed in the injured spinal cord are accompanied by alterations in gene expression within the spinal cord, particularly of those genes involved in secondary injury and the immune response. To test this hypothesis, a dorsal hemisection at vertebral level T9 was performed. The injured spinal cord from rat was then exposed to laser light (810nm, 150mW, 2,997 seconds, 0.3cm2 spot area, 1589 J/cm2) and spinal cord samples, including the injury site, were harvested at 6 and 48 hours and 4 days post-injury. Total RNA was extracted and purified from the lesioned spinal cord and cDNA copies were either labeled with [32P] for microarray analysis or amplified and analyzed with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

Microarray results revealed a suppression of genes involved in the immune response and excitotoxic cell death at 6 hours post-injury, as well as cell proliferation and scar formation at 48 hours post-injury in the light treated group. Analysis of the PCR products revealed that light treatment resulted in a significant suppression of expression of genes that normally peak between 6 and 24 hours post-injury, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL6), the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; p<0.05). Genes expressed earlier than 6 hours post-injury, such as IL1b, tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1a (MIP-1a) were not affected by light treatment.

Although the precise role some of these genes play in axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury is currently unclear, these data demonstrate that light therapy has an anti-inflammatory effect on the injured spinal cord, and may reduce secondary injury, thus providing a possible mechanism by which light therapy may result in axonal regeneration.

Laser Therapy.1997; 9 (4): 151.

An innovative approach to induce regeneration and the repair of spinal cord injury.

Rochkind S, Shahar A. Nevo Z.

An Israeli research group has investigated an innovative method of repairing injured spinal cords. In a rat model the spinal cords were transected in 31 animals (between T7/T8).  In vitro constructed composite implants were used in the transected area. These implants contained embryonal spinal cord neuronal cells dissociated from rat fetuses, cultured on biodegradable microcarriers. After being embedded in hyaluronic acid the implants were ready to be placed into the injured area. The whole lesion area was covered with a thin coagulated fibrin-based membrane. Control animals underwent the same laminectomy but did not receive any implant. In all animals the wound was closed normally. Laser therapy was started immediately after surgery. It was continued daily for two weeks using 780 nm, 200 mW, 30 minutes daily.  One group received the implant but no laser. During the 3-6 months follow up, 14 of the 15 animals that received laser (A) showed different degrees of active movements in one or both legs, compared to 4 of 9 animals in the group who had received implants but no laser (B). In the group receiving no implant and no laser (C), 1 out of 7 showed some motor movements in one leg. Somatosensory evoked potentials were elicited in 10 of the 15 rats in group A at three months, and on one side in one animal in group B. Axon sprouting was observed as soon as three days post surgery, in group A only.

Laser Therapy.1997; 9 (4): 151

New hope for patients with spinal cord injuries.

Rochkind S, Shahar A. Nevo Z.

An Israeli research group has investigated an innovative method of repairing injured spinal cords. In a rat model the spinal cords were transected in 31 animals (between T7/T8).  In vitro constructed composite implants were used in the transected area. These implants contained embryonal spinal cord neuronal cells dissociated from rat fetuses, cultured on biodegradable microcarriers. After being embedded in hyaluronic acid the implants were ready to be placed into the injured area. The whole lesion area was covered with a thin coagulated fibrin-based membrane. Control animals underwent the same laminectomy but did not receive any implant. In all animals the wound was closed normally. Laser therapy was started immediately after surgery. It was continued daily for two weeks using 780 nm, 200 mW, 30 minutes daily.  One group received the implant but no laser. During the 3-6 months follow up, 14 of the 15 animals that received laser (A) showed different degrees of active movements in one or both legs, compared to 4 of 9 animals in the group who had received implants but no laser (B). In the group receiving no implant and no laser (C), 1 out of 7 showed some motor movements in one leg. Somatosensory evoked potentials were elicited in 10 of the 15 rats in group A at three months, and on one side in one animal in group B. Axon sprouting was observed as soon as three days post surgery, in group A only.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1990 Jan;15(1):6-10.

Spinal cord response to laser treatment of injured peripheral nerve.

Rochkind S, Vogler I, Barr-Nea L.

Department of Neurosurgery, Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Israel.

Abstract

The authors describe the changes occurring in the spinal cord of rats subjected to crush injury of the sciatic nerve followed by low-power laser irradiation of the injured nerve. Such laser treatment of the crushed peripheral nerve has been found to mitigate the degenerative changes in the corresponding neurons of the spinal cord and induce proliferation of neuroglia both in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This suggests a higher metabolism in neurons and a better ability for myelin production under the influence of laser treatment.

Lasers Surg Med. 1989;9(2):174-82.

Systemic effects of low-power laser irradiation on the peripheral and central nervous system, cutaneous wounds, and burns.

Rochkind S, Rousso M, Nissan M, Villarreal M, Barr-Nea L, Rees DG.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Ichilov Hospital, Israel.

Abstract

In this paper, we direct attention to the systemic effect of low-power helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on the recovery of the injured peripheral and central nervous system, as well as healing of cutaneous wounds and burns. Laser irradiation on only the right side in bilaterally inflicted cutaneous wounds enhanced recovery in both sides compared to the nonirradiated control group (P less than .01). Similar results were obtained in bilateral burns: irradiating one of the burned sites also caused accelerated healing in the nonirradiated site (P less than .01). However, in the nonirradiated control group, all rats suffered advanced necrosis of the feet and bilateral gangrene. Low-power HeNe laser irradiation applied to a crushed injured sciatic nerve in the right leg in a bilaterally inflicted crush injury, significantly increased the compound action potential in the left nonirradiated leg as well. The statistical analysis shows a highly significant difference between the laser-treated group and the control nonirradiated group (P less than .001). Finally, the systemic effect was found in the spinal cord segments corresponding to the crushed sciatic nerves. The bilateral retrograde degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord expected after the bilateral crush injury of the peripheral nerves was greatly reduced in the laser treated group. The systemic effects reported here are relevant in terms of the clinical application of low-power laser irradiation as well as for basic research into the possible mechanisms involved.

Health Phys. 1989 May;56(5):687-90.

New biological phenomena associated with laser radiation.

Belkin M, Schwartz M.

Goldschleger Eye Research Institute, Tel-Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.

Abstract

Low-energy laser irradiation produces significant bioeffects. These effects are manifested in biochemical, physiological and proliferative phenomena in various enzymes, cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Examples are given of the effect of He-Ne laser irradiation in preventing the post-traumatic degeneration of peripheral nerves and the postponement of degeneration of the central nervous system. The damage produced by similar radiant exposures to the corneal epithelium and endothelium is also described. It is suggested that the mechanism of laser/tissue interaction at these low levels of radiant exposure is photochemical in nature, explaining most of the characteristics of these effects. These low-energy laser bioeffects are of importance on a basic scientific level, from a laser safety aspect and as a medical therapeutic modality.

Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe

Curatronic’s new Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe is an  extraordinary, new tool designed for rapid, effective pain therapy.

Curatron system with Combo Probe

Bill G shattered his calcaneus in a fall from a roof.  He came to our clinic eleven months later and after foot reconstruction surgery with chronic pain he scored three on a zero to 10 scale.  After 10 minutes of therapy with the Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe, pain was gone.   Swelling was reduced, and color around his ankle improved appreciably right away.    Over a course of ten sessions, his heel, ankle and foot have continued to heal visibly.  Afternoon edema is no longer a major concern, range of motion is greater, and baseline pain is less than one.  Bill is thrilled, and so are we!   

LED-PEMF Combined Probe Combo Probe - Side View Combo Probe - Back

HIGH INTENSITY, TARGETED PEMF-LEDT

The Combo Probe delivers extreme, high intensity, combined PEMF and LED therapy in a compact, handheld applicator.  If you have come to view PEMF as a staid and conservative method with incremental results, think again!      The Combo Probe’s field of 150 milliTeslas is 3,000 times greater than earth’s.

The Combo Probe simultaneously produces 2 Watts of 640  synchronized with the high intensity PEMF in a pulse sequence which changes every 60 seconds.    When treatment is given to single area for one, ten minute cycle, the Combo Probe will have administered 37.5 Joules/cm2 there, a considerable dosage likely to achieve analgesia effectively on its own also joined with the highest intensity PEMF we have ever seen in a Curatronic product. 

APPLYING THE COMBO PROBE IN PAIN

 

The Combo Probe can be set to treat at low, medium or high intensity, for five, ten or fifteen minutes.  We recommend staying with high intensity for almost any joint or soft tissue pain.   (An exception would be in long-standing, chronic pain where there is acute inflammation, i.e. a knee which is hot to the touch –  reduce intensity and/or treatment time here.)

One cycle of ten minutes at high intensity over a painful joint or soft tissue area has significantly reduced pain  for us nearly every time.   A back and/or hip or other larger area may (or may not) justify a second, ten minute application.

Self treating knee - Combo Probe Self treating neck with Combo Probe Self treating back Combo Probe  

For best results in pain therapy, always treat in full contact (or as close to it as anatomy comfortably allows).  Through contact treatment, optimal forward transmission of light is achieved, and more photon energy will reach deeper to improve patient outcomes.

Moving over a painful joint or area of soft tissue area as the Combo Probe’s manual recommends has worked very well.   Our advice is to limit your treatment to the immediate area around one ankle, knee, elbow,or shoulder joint or soft tissue area for every 10  minutes of therapy.   We usually ask patients to do it, spending at least half of a ten minute treatment cycle directly over the point of greatest pain.  If pain is confined to a small area and can be located very precisely, our counsel usually would be to ask the patient to hold the Combo Probe in steady contact there for the full ten minutes.

****A huge, added bonus with the Combo Probe is that treatment usually can be unattended, freeing up valuable time for the clinician.   In our experience most patients enjoy and are fully capable of treating themselves successfully with instruction – so long as the targeted joint or soft tissue is comfortably within reach.    Who better to do it? [1]

Case Study – Spinal Stenosis/Pain/Limited Mobility

Richard B was an 85 year old diabetic male with a history of spinal stenosis, back surgery and arthritis who had been essentially chair bound for several years during the day.  Chief complaints were 1) difficulty in walking or standing for any length of time and 2) low back and leg pain and numbness which quickly intensified intolerably whenever he tried.  Richard slept in his chair much of the day. 

With integrated Combo Probe and laser therapy, he regained mobility and resumed activity almost immediately.  He installed a new faucet in a bathroom after the second visit and began doing other work around the house again.   Richard decided he was ready to be discharged after just six treatments.  We were skeptical.   On follow up by phone one month later, he continues actively engaged in daily life with little limitation or discomfort.  In light of his diagnosis of spinal stenosis and clinical picture at the outset, the speed and degree of Richard’s recovery is astonishing.

OUR EVALUATION

The Combo Probe is a ground breaking product which in our experience can make a positive difference in most pain on its own.   When we have combined it with other methods such as laser therapy, already positive outcomes have been enhanced, or so it has seemed to us and to our patients.

Patients appreciate the Combo Probe for its 1) efficacy, 2) quick treatment time and 3) ease of application – as do we.  Yet the greatest gift of all for us has been a feeling of liberation and  new found freedom to focus our energies elsewhere in the clinic.  Our patients clearly enjoy treating themselves, and perhaps they appreciate the results even more because it involves them actively in therapy.  They are happy.  We are happy – and plan to take full advantage of the free time!

Something new which quickly and effectively treats pain and  enhances other methods is rare and noteworthy.   Reader, are you taking note? 

The closest comparison to how this feels for us is the joy experienced when first seeing patients recover from seemingly intractable pain through laser therapy 20 year’s ago.  Our enthusiasm and appreciation for lasers has only grown since.  The Combo Probe feels like that.

Ours was a prototype provided for clinical testing.  We used it hard for over six months with most patients, and it performed beautifully.

Combo probe with connectorYet a weak point was the way in which the cable was wired directly into the unit.  The manufacturer corrected this right away.  Now the 3.5 meter cable interfaces through a connector and can be changed immediately at need (as illustrated above).  We do encourage you to purchase an extra cable with your Combo Probe to have in reserve as even the best cable will fail eventually.

With PEMF of 150 milliTesla and 2 Watts of led light simultaneously being generated by the Combo Probe, heat is an unavoidable byproduct.  Our experience has been that the Combo Probe is well accepted and comfortable when used for two, immediately consecutive, 10 minute cycles, and some patients will be comfortable with a third cycle.

In Summary

The Combo Probe is a highly worthwhile, new tool which has enhanced outcomes in pain therapy for us significantly.  Therapy is quick, well accepted and can often be unattended.

If you already own a Curatronic PC2000, adding the Combo Probe promises bring a whole new dimension to what you can accomplish with it.  You will need to upgrade to new software to handle the higher power.  In light of the results we’ve seen, this decision would be a no-brainer for us.

If you are treating pain but do not yet own a Curatronic system, the Combo Probe, in and of itself, is excellent reason to purchase one.  Highly recommended.

LED-PEMF Combined Probe Combination PEMF-LED Probe Specifications

Light emitting diodes: 50 x 640nm-40mW

Peak light power / Average light power: 2000 mW / 1000 mW.

Effective red light therapy area: 16 cm2 (~ 2½ inch2)

Peak / Average power density: 125 mW/cm2  / 62.5 mW/cm2

PEMF max intensity 150 milliTesla (1500 Gauss) with  PC/Super, 3D/Ultra and XP/Pro special.

PEMF max intensity 100 milliTesla (1000 Gauss) with XP/Pro.

Pulse duty cycle: 50%.  Pulse frequency: 1 – 50 Hz

Device Size: Length 13 cm (5.1″), Width 12 cm (4.7″), Height 6.5 cm (2.5″) and 10 cm (4″) with the handle

Weight: 1.1 Kg (2.4 lbs)

[1] Although we may not be able to prove that outcomes are better when patients treat themselves, ours clearly enjoy it – and our own belief system is that whenever an individual invests personal energy in his own care, that effort will inevitably be rewarded.  

[2]Hode L, Tuner J, Laser Phototherapy: Clinical Practice and Scientific Background.  page 140.

 

 

Order Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe Combination High Power PEMF-LED Probe @ $3,750.00