Alopecia

Adv Ther. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):220-9.

Essential oils and low-intensity electromagnetic pulses in the treatment of androgen-dependent alopecia.

Bureau JP, Ginouves P, Guilbaud J, Roux ME.

University of Medicine, Montpellier, France.

This double-blind randomized study vs placebo in healthy male and female volunteers demonstrates the positive biologic effect on hair loss and hair regrowth of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with essential oils administered according to a regular treatment schedule of 26 weeks. Mean hair count comparisons within the groups significantly favor the treatment group, which exhibited a decrease in hair loss in 83% of the volunteers and a more than 20% hair count increase over baseline in 53% of patients. The process exhibited no side effects or untoward reactions. The histologic examination correlated with the clinical study. A parallel immunohistochemical examination showed an increase in the proliferation index, and when the expression of Ki67 (a cell proliferation marker) is increased, the mitoses are barely visible in the histologic examination. The rationale of this phenomenon is considered to be due to an electrophysiologic effect on the quiescent hair follicle.

Psychooncology. 2002 May-Jun;11(3):244-8.

Pulsed electrostatic fields (ETG) to reduce hair loss in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast carcinoma: a pilot study.

Benjamin B, Ziginskas D, Harman J, Meakin T.

St. Marks Breast Centre, 10 St. Marks Road, Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

AIMS: To determine whether specific pulsed electrostatic fields, or electrotrichogenesis (ETG), could potentially prevent or reduce hair loss in patients undergoing adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy for breast cancer.

METHODS: Thirteen women were followed during their adjuvant ETG and chemotherapy treatment to determine the efficacy of ETG. All patients were treated for 12 min, twice weekly with a pulsed electrostatic field. Quantitative hair loss was measured by photographic assessment, and manual hair count. Quality of life assessment was conducted at the end of the study.

RESULTS: Twelve out of 13 participants had good hair retention throughout the chemotherapy period and afterwards. There were no reported side effects attributable to ETG.

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows encouraging results in an area where no other appropriate treatment is available Reducing alopecia, secondary to chemotherapy has the potential to increase CMF treatment compliance, enhance patient self-esteem, and improve overall quality of life during this stressful period.

Int J Dermatol. 1990 Jul-Aug;29(6):446-50.

The biological effects of a pulsed electrostatic field with specific reference to hair.  Electotrichogenesis.

Maddin WS, Bell PW, James JH.

Division of Dermatology, University of British Columbia School of Medicine, Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

This comparative, controlled study demonstrates the positive biologic effect on hair regrowth of a pulsed electrical field administered according to a regularized treatment schedule over 36 weeks. Mean hair count comparisons within the groups significantly favor the treatment group, which exhibited a 66.1% hair count increase over baseline. The control group increase over baseline was 25.6%. It is notable also that 29 of the 30 treatment subjects (96.7%) exhibited regrowth or no further hair loss. The process is without side effects and untoward reactions. The rationale of this phenomenon is unclear but is considered to be due to an electrophysiologic effect on the quiescent hair follicle, similar to that documented with respect to bone fracture and soft tissue repair enhancement. The electrical pulse may cause increased cell mitosis through calcium influx, involving both the hair follicle sheath and dermal papilla cells.